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ALMANAC 




-AND- 




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-FOR THE- 



SOUTHERN STATES. 



* « — ^^ — * ' 



P 



ESIGNED: 



To GIVE Directions for the Cultivation of Vegetables, 

AS PRACTICED IN THE SOUTH. 



Entered according to Act of Congress by Eichaed Erotschee, in tlie Office of the Librarian at 

Washington, in the year 1877. 



w 



arehouse: 



15 & 17 DU MAINE STREET, 

NEAR THE FRENCH MARKET, 

BRANCH STORE, 102 GRAVIER ST., 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 



-^^ 



^^ 



'^' 



•1^ 



GEO. MULLER, PRINTER, 50 BIENVILLE STREET, 

1894. 



INTRODUCTION. 



tt^gA^N presenting the Seventeenth Annual edition of my 



Sadden gffleinhal 




-^» 




to my many friends and the pubh'c in general, I should state that 
I have but few new features to add. It is, as mentioned in my 
former editions, designed to give plain instructions how to culti- 
vate Vegetables, Flowers and other crops in the South ; more so 
in this particular section. The long experience w^hich I have had 
as a practical gardener and seedsman enables me to do so. 

My business has increased every year. It has always been 
my endeavor to serve my customers faithfully and to gain their 
confidence. It is flattering to me to have been so successful in 
my efforts. 

The sowing of good seed is of the greatest importance, and 
those who favor me with their orders, can rest assured that no 
pains will be spared to have the very best. 

Yours truly. 



KICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



SEEDS BY MAIL. 



Seeds can be sent by mail to any part of the United States in packages not exceeding four 
pounds, at eight cts. per pound, or one cent for two ounces, or fraction thereof. On seeds 
ordered in papers or by the ounce I prepay the postage, except on peas, beans and corn. This 
refers to large sized papers which are sold at one dollar per dozen. When ordered by the i^ound 
eig'llt cents per pound postage has to be added to the price of the seeds; to peas, beans and 
corn, fifteen eents per .quart. 

All packages are put up in the most careful manner, and every precaution is taken to insure 
their reaching their destination in safety. Purchasers living at any place where my seeds are 
not sold, are requested to write to me to obtain their supplies. This will be more profitable than 
to buy from country stores where seeds left on commission are often kept till all power of ger- 
mination is destroyed. As seed merchants, who give their goods out on commission, rarely col- 
lect what is not sold, oftener than once every twelve months, and as Lettuce, Spinach, Parsnip, 
Carrots, and many other seeds will either not sprout at all or grow imperfectly if kept over a 
summer in the south — to bu}- and plant such, is but money, time and labor wasted. 

Here in our climate, where we plant garden vegetables as freely in autumn as in spring, and 
where often the seeds have to be put in the ground when the weather is very warm, it is an 
indispensable necessity to have perfect!}" fresh seeds. 

My arrangements with my growers are made so that I receive the new crop; expressly 
cleaned for me, as soon as it is matured. The varieties which are not raised in the North, I 
order from Europe, and have them shipped so as to reach me about the beginning of August, 
just the time they are needed for fall planting. By following this plan I have always a full 
supply of fresh seeds of undoubted germinating qualities, while dealers, who sell on commission , 
have only those from the winter previous. 

On the receipt of one dollar I will mail thirteen large size papers of seeds, put up the same 
as seeds sold by the pound. These papers can be s'elected from this Catalogue, and include four 
papers of either Beans or Peas in the thirteen papers. Or, for the same amount, I will mail 
twenty smaller papers, including four papers of either Peas or Beans. This is done to enable 
consumers to get reliable seeds in good size papers in places where my seeds are not sold. The 
papers put up by Northern seedsmen are so small that of some varieties they hardly contain 
enough to do any good. The low prices charged to merchants are made at the expense of 
consumers. My papers are large and worth the full value of the money paid for them. 

It cannot be too well impressed on the minds of all cultivators of vegetables, that most 
seeds kept through a summer in this climate will not grow, and that all who use such seeds will 
be losers. 

All seeds that leave my establishment are thoroao-hly tested. 

Having received a great many complaints that letters which Avere 
addressed to me and contained money, were not answered, I must state 
that these letters never reached me, and, therefore, would caution my 
customers not to send any money in letters without registering same. By 
sending one dollar, or upwards, the cost, ten cents, can be charged to 
me. The cheapest and surest way is money order. Postal Kote or draft, 
but w^here they cannot be had, letters have to be registered, which can 
be done at any Post Office. 

On all goods ordered C. O. D. one fourth of the amount cjf hill must 
accompany the order; otherwise the same will not be tilled. All hilts s.ve 
payable in iVew? Orleans ov JSTeiv York exchange. No individual Checks 
on country banks received on amounts under Ten doJlars. 

'^^=A receive a good many letters which are i)lainly enough written, 
except the signature. To insure prompt tilling of orders, I ask all cus- 
tomers and others writing to me, to write their name plainly; at the 
same time, never fail to give the name of the nearest Post Office and 
Express Station. Also write out the order in column*, not in the body 
of the letter. Some letters came in without any sio-nature; when the 
Post Office was properly given, I returned the letter to the Post Master 
of that place, and in some instances have traced up the writer in that wa}^ 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



1st Month. 



JANUARY. 



31 Days. 



Calculated for the Ijatitude 6ftlie Soutliern Statees. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



Xew Moou 
First Quarter 
Fall Moou . 
Last Quarter . 



lid 
21d. 

28d 



9h. 


7m. 


Eveniug. 


(ill. 


9ni. 


Evening'. 


Oh. 


l]m. 


Morning 


. loh. 


51m. 


Morning. 



DAY 

OF 

Montli and Week. 



Sun 


Sun 


Moun 


rises. 


sets. 


r. & 8. 


li. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 



rl-IHONOLOGY OF IMPOltTANT EVENTS. 



Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Tlinrsday, 

Fridaj^, 

Saturday, 



[ 6 56 


5 12 


2 15 


1 6 56 


5 13 


3 12 


6 57 


5 13 


4 8 


6 57 


5 14 


5 5 


6 57 


5 15 


6 


6 57 


5 15 


sets 



Christian New Year. Circumcision. 

"William Kinglake, British Historian, died, 1891. 

Battle of Princeton, 1777. 

Introduction of Silk manuf'es into Europe, 1536. 

Dr. Ben Bush born, 1745. 

Epiphany. 



1) 1st Sunday after Epiphany. 



Luke 2. 



Day's length, lOh. 19m. 



7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 



Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

Friday, 

Saturday, 



6 57 


5 16 


5 47 


6 57 


5 17 


6 44 


6 57 


5 18 


7 41 


6 57 


5 19 


8 39 


6 57 


5 19 


9 37 


6 57 


5 20 


10 34 


6 57 


5 21 


11 31 



Liberia colonized, 1822. 

Battle of N. O., 1815. 

Napoleon III died, 1873. 

First Steamboat arrived in New Orleans, 1812. 

Secession of Florida, 1861. 

Bonaparte family exiled, 1816. 

George Fox, Founder of Sect Quakers, died, 1690. 



2) 2nd Sunday after Epiphany 



John 2. 



Day's length, lOh. 25m. 



14 


Sunday, 


6 57 


5 22 


morn 


Edmond Holley died, 1742. 




15 


Monday, 


6 57 


5 23 


33 


Fort Fisher captured, 1865. 




16 


Tuesday, 


6 57 


5 24 


1 38 


Edmond Spencer, Poet, died, 1599. 




17 


Wednesday, 


6 57 


5 25 


2 48 


George Bancroft died, 1891. 




18 


Thursday, 


6 56 


5 25 


3 59 


German Empire proclaimed, 1871. 




19 


Friday, 


6 56 


5 26 


5 9 


Cimbria sunk, 1883. 




20 


Saturday, 


6 56 


5 27 


6 15 


David Garrick died, 1779. 





3) Septuagesima Sunday. 



Matth. 20. 



Day's length, lOh. 33m. 



21 


Sunday, 


6 55 


5 28 


rises 


Gen. Fremont born, 1813. 


22 


Monday, 


6 55 


5 29 


6 52 


Battle Frenchtown, 1813. 


23 


Tuesday, 


6 55 


5 30 


8 2 


Thanksgiving for victory of 8th, 1815. 


24 


Wednesday, 


6 54 


5 31 


9 7 


Miles Byrne, Irish Hero, died, 1862. 


25 


Thursday, 


6 54 


5 31 


10 8 


Gen. Ewell died, 1872. 


26 


Friday, 


6 54 


5 32 


11 7 


Louisiana seceded, 1861. 


27 


Saturday, 


6 53 


5 33 


morn 


Fall of Khartoum, 1885. 



4) Sexagesima Sunday. 

» 



Luke 8. 



Day's length, lOh. 41m. 



28 i Sunday, 

29 Monday, 

30 Tuesday, 

31 AVednesday, 



6 53 


5 34 


5 


1 6 52 


5 35 


1 4 


1 6 52 


5 36 


2 2 


6 51 


5 37 


2 59 



Peter the Great died, 1725. 
Kansas admitted, 1861. 
John M. Clayton assassinated, 1889. 
J. G. Blaine born, 1830. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts,— 5654.— January 8, Rosh Chodesh Shebat; 

22, Chamisho Osor. 



EICHAED FKOTSCHER'S ALMA>'AC AXD GARDEN MANUAL 



2d Mouth. 



FEBRUARY 



28 Days. 



CalcTxlated. for tlie Latitu.d.e of th.e SoiatlieiTi. States. 



3I00X"S PHASES. 

Xew Moon 5d. 3h. 15m. Evening. 

First Quarter ' 13d. Ih. ISm. Morning. 

Full Moon — 19d. 8h. 16m. Evening. 

Last Quarter 21d. 6h. 28m. Morning. 



DAT 

OF 

Month and "Week. 


Sun 

rises. 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 
r. & s. 

h. m. 


CHEOXOLOGY OF IMPOETA^'T E\EXTS. 


1 Tliiii-sdav. 6 51 5 38 . 3 51 

2 Fridav. ' 6 50 5 38 1 16 

3 Satoi-dav. 6 19 5 39 5 35 


Washington elected President, 1789. 
Feast of the Pmification. Candlemas. • 
Eussian-Tvirkish War ends. 1878. 



5) Quinqaagesima Sunday. 



Luke 18. 



Day's length, lOh. 51m. 



4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 



Sunday, 

Monday. 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

Friday, 

Saturday, 



6 19 


5 lij 


6 17 


6 18 


5 11 


sets 


6 17 


5 12 


6 31 


: 6 17 


5 12 


7 31 


: 6 16 


5 13 


8 29 


6 15 


5 H 


9 27 


j 6 4A 


5 15 


10 27 , 



Conf. Concjress at Montgomerv. 1861. 

Ole Bnll born, 1810. 

Mardi Gras, CarniTal in Xew Orleans. 

Ash Wednesday. 

Treatv Triple Alliance. 1888. 

William E. Dodge died, 1883. 

Canada confirmed to England, 1763. 



6^ Ist Sundav in Lent. 



Matth. 1. 



Day's length, llh. 2m. 



11 
12 
13 
11 
15 
16 
17 



Sunday, 

]\Ionday. 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thiu'sday, 

Friday, 

Satnrdav. 



6 11 
6 13 
6 12 
6 41 
6 40 
6 39 
6 38 



5 16 


11 29 


5 17 


morn 


5 17 


35 


1 5 18 


1 13 


: 5 19 


2 52 


5 50 


3 58 


5 51 


1 55 



Thomas A. Edison born. 1817. 

Abraham Lincoln, born, 1812. 

Eichard Wagner, died, 1883. 

Charles LE, Eing of England, died, 1865. 

St. Louis founded, 1761. 

First gold found in California 1818. --Mai-shaU's 

Peace with England, 1815. [Nugget." 



7) 2d Sundav in Lent. 



Matth. 15. 



Day's length, 



llh. 11m. 



18 


Sunday, 


6 37 


5 51 


5 19 


Count Andi-assv. died. 1890. 


19 


Mondav. 


6 36 


o 52 


rises 


Sepov Eevolt began, 1857. 


20 


Tuesdav. 


6 36 


5 53 


6 15 


Earthcjuake in Chili. 1835. 


21 


Wednesdav. 


6 35 


5 51 


7 18 


Santa Anna born. 1798. 


22 


Thiu'sdav. 


6 31 


5 51 


8 50 


Washington born. 1732. 


23 


Fridav. 


6 33 


5 55 


9 51 


Battle Buena Yista. 1S17. 


24 


Satui'day, 


6 32 


5 56 


10 51 


Fulton died. 1815. 



8) 3d Sunday in Lent. 



Luke 11. 



Dav's length, llh. 25m. 



25 Sunday, 

26 Mondav. 



zi 



Tuesdav. 



28 Wednesday, 



6 31 


5 56 


11 50 


6 30 


5 57 


morn 


6 29 


5 58 


48 


6 28 


5 58 


2 15 



Christopher Wren died, 1723. 
Thos. Moore died, 1852. 
Joint High Commission, 1871. 
Biela's Comet discovered. 1826. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts,— 5651.— February 6 & 7, Rosh Chodesh Adar Eishon. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



3d Month. 



MARCH. 



31 Days. 



Calculated, for tlie Latitude of the Souther'n. States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

New Moon Td. 

First Quarter ". ...14d. 

Full Moon 21d. 

Last Quarter 29d. 



8h. 


18m. 


Morning. 


Oh. 


28m. 


Morning. 


8h. 


11m. 


Morning. 


2h. 


28m. 


Morning. 



DAY 

OF 

Month and Week. 



Sun 
rises. 

h. m. 


Sun 
sets. 

li. m. 


Moon 

r. & s. 

h. m. 


6 27 
6 25 
6 24 


5 59 

6 
6 


2 39 

3 29 

4 14 



CHRONOLOGY OF IMPORTANT EVENTS. 



Thursday, 

Friday, 

Saturday 



1st Number of the Spectator published, 1711. 
Washington Territory organized, 1864. 
A. H. Stephens died, 1883. 



9) 4th Sunday in Lent. 



John 6. 



Day's length, llh. 38m. 



4 


Sunday, 


6 23 


6 1 


4 54 


First U. S. Congress, 1789. 




5 


Monday, 


6 22 


6 2 


5 29 


Boston Massacre, 1770, 




6 


Tuesday, 


6 21 


6 3 


6 


Artemus Ward died, 1867. 




7 


Wednesday, 


6 20 


6 3 


sets 


Florida admitted, 1845. 




8 


Thursday, 


6 18 


6 4 


7 20 


Capt. Ericsson died, 1889. 




9 


Friday, 


6 17 


6 5 


8 20 


Battle Hampton Boads, 1862. 




10 


Saturday, 


6 16 


6 5 


9 23 


McCloskey, first cardinal in U. S., 


1875. 



10) 5th Sunday in Lent. 



John 8. 



Day's length, llh. 51m. 



11 


Sunday, 


6 15 


6 6 


10 29 


Chas. Sumner died, 1873. 


12 


Monday, 


6 14 


6 6 


11 36 


F. W. Dawson assassinated, 1889. 


13 


Tuesday, 


6 13 


6 7 


morn 


La Fontaine died, 1695. 


14 


Wednesday, 


6 11 


6 8 


44 


Andrew Jackson born, 1767. 


15 


Thursday, 


6 10 


6 8 


1 50 


Samoan disaster, 1889. 


16 


Friday, 


6 8 


6 9 


2 50 


French Prince Imperial born, 1856. 


17 


Saturday, 


6 9 


6 10 


3 42 


St. Patrick's Day. 



11) Palm Sunday. 



Matth. 21. 



Day's length, 12h. 3m. 



Sunday, 


6 7 


6 10 


4 27 


Monday, 


6 6 


6 11 


5 4 


Tuesday, 


'6 4 


6 11 


5 36 


Wednesday, 


6 3 


6 12. 


rises 


Thursday, 


6 2 


6 13 


7 35 


Friday, 


6 


6 13 


8 34 


Saturday, 


5 59 


6 14 


9 36 



18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 



12) Easter Sunday. 



Stamp Act repealed, 1766. 
Spring begins. St. Joseph's day. 
Vesta discovered, 1807. 
Southe}^ poet, died, 1843. 
Goethe died, 1832. 
Chief Justice Waite died, 1888. 
Herculaneum discovered, 1737. 



Mark. 16. 



Day's length, 12h. 6m. 



25 

26 

27 



Sunday, 

Monday, 
Tuesday, 



28 Wednesday, 

29 Thursday, 

30 Friday, 

31 Saturday, 



5 58 


6 14 


10 36 


5 56 


6 15 


11 35 


5 55 


6 10 


morn 


5 54 


6 16 


31 


5 53 


6 17 


1 22 


5 52 


6 17 


2 9 


5 51 


6 18 


2 51 



Easter Sunday. Annunciation. Treaty of Vienna. 

Beethoven died, 1827. 

John Bright died, 1889. 

Ex-Governor John McEnery died, 1891. 

Vera Cruz taken, 1847. 

Earl Granville, liberal Leader, died, 1891. 

Calhoun died, 1850. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5654.— March 3, I'arshot Shekolim, 8 & 9, Rosh 
Chodesh Adar Shenie, 21, Zom Ester ; 22, Purim. 



EICHAKD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



4th Month. 



APRIU 



30 Days. 



CalcTalated for tlie Latitude of tlie Soutliern. States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

New Moon 5d. 

First Quarter 12d. 

Full Moon , 19d. 

Last Quarter 27d. 



lOh. 


Om. 


Evening. 


6h. 


32m. 


Evening. 


9h. 


Im. 


Evening 


9h. 


20m. 


Evening. 



DAY 

OF 

Month and Week 



Sun 


Siin 


Moon 


rises. 


sets. 


r. & s. 


h. m. 


li. m. 


h. m. 



CHRONOLOGY OF IMPORTANT EVENTS. 



13 j 1st Sunday after Easter. 



John 20. 



Day's length, 12h. 29m. 



Swnclay, 

Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

Friday, 

Saturday, 



5 50 


6 19 


3 26 


5 48 


6 19 


4 


5 47 


6 20 


4 29 


5 46 


6 20 


4 57 


5 45 


6 21 


5 27 


5 44 


6 22 


sets 


5 43 


6 22 


8 17 



AU Fool's Day. 

Bismark born, 1815, 

Washington Irving born, 1783. 

Peter Cooper died, 1883. 

Napoleon I abdicated, 1814, 

Frost and ice in Louisiana and Mississippi, 

P. T. Barnum, showman, died, 1891. 



1891. 



14) 2d SuDday after Easter, 



John 10. 



Day's length, 12h. 42m. 



8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 



Sunday, 

Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

Friday, 

Saturday, 



5 41 


6 23 


9 26 


5 40 


6 23 


10 36 


5 39 


6 24 


11 43 


5 38 


6 25 


morn 


5 37 


6 25 


45 


5 36 


6 26 


1 39 


5 35 


6 26 


2 25 



Louisiana admitted to the Union, 1812, 

Gen. Lee surrendered, 1865. 

U. S. Bank incorporated, 1816. 

Gen. Canby kiUed, 1873. 

First Gun of Civil War fired at Fort Sumter, 1861. 

Samuel J. Eandah died, 1890. 

National Cricket League of U. S, organized, 1891, 



15) 3d Sunday after Easter. 



22 
23 

24 
25 
26 
27 

28 



John 16, 



Day's length, 12h. 54m. 



15 


Sunday, 


5 33 


6 27 


3 6 


Mathew Arnold died, 1888, 


16 


Monday, 


5 32 


6 28 


3 40 


American Asylum for Deaf and Dumb opened, 1817. 


17 


Tuesday, 


5 31 


6 28 


4 9 


Hudson landed at Manhattan Island, 1609, 


18 


Wednesday, 


5 30 


6 29 


4 38 


Liebig died, 1873. 


19 


Thursday, 


5 29 


6 29 


5 7 


Battle of Lexington, 1775. 


20 


Friday, 


5 28 


6 30 


rises 


West Virginia admitted, 1863. 


21 


Saturday, 


5 27 


6 31 


8 22 


Battle of San Jacinto, 1836. 



16) 4th Sunday after Easter. 



John. 16. 



Day's length, 13h. 5m. 



Sunday, 

Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

Friday, 

Saturday, 



5 26 


6 31 


9 23 


5 25 


6 32 


10 19 


5 24 


6 33 


11 13 


5 23 


6 33 


morn 


5 22 


6 34 


3 


5 21 


6 34 


46 


5 20 


6 35 


1 24 



Thomas Haynes Bayly died, 1839, 

St, George's Day, 

Capture of Forts Jackson and St. Philij), 

St. Mark's Day, 

David Hume born, 1711, 

Emile de Girardin died, 1881, 

Mutiny of the ship Bounty, 1789, 



1862. 



17) 5th Sunday after Easter4 



John 16. 



Day's length, 13h. 17m. 



29 
30 



Sunday, 

Monday, 



5 19 


6 36 


1 58 


5 18 


6 36 


2 28 



King Edward IV of England born, 1441. 
Washington inaugurated, 1789. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts. — 5654,— April 7, Eosh Chodesh Nisan ; 21 & 22, First 

days Pessach ; 27 & 28, Last days Pessach. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



5th Month. 



MAY. 



31 



Days. 



Calcialated for tlie Latitude of tlie Sou-tliern States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

New Moon 5d. 8h. 

First Quarter 12d. Oh. 

Full Moon 19d. lOh. 

Last Quarter 27d. 2h. 



42m. Morning. 

21m. Evening. 

43m. Morning. 

4m. Evening. 



DAY 

OF 

Month and Week. 



Snn 

rises 

h. m. 



Sun 

sets 

li. m. 



Moon 
r. & s 

li. ni. 



CHRONOLOGY OF IMPOETANT EVENTS. 



Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

Fiiday, 

Saturday, 



5 17 


6 37 


2 56 


5 17 


6 38 


3 25 


5 16 


6 38 


3 55 


5 15 


6 39 


4 26 


5 14 


6 39 


sets 



Ancient "Day of Games" in England. 
Battle of Chancellorville, 1863. 
Ascension Day. 

Dynamite riots in Chicago, 1886. 
Nai^oleon I died, 1821. 



18) 6th Sunday after Easter. 



John 15. 



Day's length, 13h. 27m. 



6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 



Sunday, 

Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

Friday, 

Saturday, 



5 13 


6 40 


8 18 


5 12 


6 41 


9 31 


5 11 


6 41 


10 37 


5 11 


6 42 


11 35 


5 10 


6 43 


morn 


5 9 


6 43 


25 


5 8 


6 44 


1 6 



Battle of Oswego, 1814. 

Alexander von Humbolt died, 1859. 

Stonewall Jackson died, 1863. 

Battle of Spottsylvania, 1864. 

Pacific Railroad completed, 1869. 

Madame Ricamire died, 1849. 

Charleston surrendered to the British, 1780. 



19) Whit Sunday. 



John 14. 



Day's length, 13h. 37m. 



13 


Sunday, 


5 8 


6 45 


1 40 


Pentecost. 




14 


Monday, 


5 7 


6 45 


2 10 


Discovery of Vaccination, 1796. 




15 


Tuesday, 


5 6 


6 46 


2 41 


East India Company dissolved, 1873. 




16 


Wednesday, 


5 6 


6 47 


3 9 


Sir William Petty born, 1623. 




17 


Thursday, 


5 5 


6 47 


3 39 


■ Talleyrand died, 1838. 




18 


Friday, 


5 5 


6 48 


4 10 


Session Grand Lodge K. of P. at Shreveport, 


1891. 


19 


Saturday, 


5 4 


6 48 


rises 


Hawthorn died, 1864. 





20) Trinity Sunday 



John 8. 



Day's length, 13h. 45m. 



20 


Sunday, 


5 4 


6 49 


8 10 


Columbus died, 1506. 


21 


Monday, 


5 3 


6 50 


9 6 


Maria Edgworth died, 1849. 


22 


Tuesday, 


5 3 


6 50 


9 57 


Title of Baronet first conferred, 1611. 


23 


Wednesday, 


5 2 


6 51 


10 41 


Kit Carson died, 1848. 


24 


Thursday, 


5 2 


6 52 


11 22 


Feast of Corpus Christi. 


25 


Friday, 


5 1 


6 52 


11 56 


Battle of Winchester, 1864. 


26 


Saturday, 


5 1 


6 53 


morn 


Hayden died, 1809. 



21) 1st Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 16. 



Day's length, 13h. 52m. 



27 
28 
29 
30 
31 



Sunday, 

Monday, 
Tuesday, 
Wednesday, 
Thursday, 



5 1 


6 53 


27 


5 


6 54 


58 


5 


6 54 


1 23 


5 


6 55 


1 52 


5 


6 55 


2 21 



Habeas Corpus enacted, 1679. 
Paris burned, 1871. 
Gen. Winf. Scott, died, 1866. 
Alexander Pope died, 1744. 
Inundation of Johnstown, 1889. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts. 



-5654.— May 6 & 7, Rosh Chodesh lyar ; 24 Lag 
Beomer. 



10 KICHAKD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




6th Month. JUNE. 


30 Days. 


CalcTilated. for the Latitude of tlie SoTitlierix States. 





MOON'S PHASES. 

New Moon 3d. 

First Quarter . lOd. 

Full Moon ........". 18d. 

Last Quarter 26d . 



4h. 


56m. 


Evening. 


7h. 


14m. 


Morning. 


111. 


6m. 


Morning. 


4h. 


2ra. 


Morning. 





DAY 

OF 

Month and Week. 


Sun 
rises 

h. m. 


Sun 
sets 

h. m. 


Moon . 

r. & s. 

h. m. 


CHRONOLOGY OF IMPORTANT EVENTS. 


1 

2 


Friday, 
Satiirday, 


4 59 
4 59 


6 56 
6 56 


2 54 

3 34 


Battle of Seven Pines 1862. 

Session United Conf. Vet's, Jackson, JVIiss., 1891. 


23) 2d Sundays 


ifter Trinity. 




Luke 14. Day's length, 13h. 58m. 



Sunday, 

Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

Friday, 

Saturday, 



4 59 


6 57 


4 21 


4 59 


6 57 


sets 


4 58 


6 58 


9 24 


4 58 


6 58 


10 18 


4 58 


6 59 


11 3 


4 58 


6 59 


11 40 


4 58 


7 


morn 



Fort Erie captured, 1814. 

Telegraph to China finished, 1871. 

Von Weber died, 1826. 

Surrender of Memphis, Tenn., 1862. 

Fishery Treaty with Great Britain, 1854. 

Andrew Jackson died, 1845. 

Charles Dickens died, 1870. 



23) 3d Sunday after Trinity. 



24 
25 

26 
27 
28 
29 
30 



Luke 15. 



Day's length, 14h. 2m. 



10 


Sunday, 


4 58 


7 


13 


Battle of Big Bethel, 1861. 


11 


Monday, 


4 58 


7 1 


42 


Sir John Frankhn died, 1847. 


12 


Tuesday, 


4 58 


7 1 


1 12 


Northern boundary treaty, 1846. 


13 


Wednesday, 


4 58 


7 1 


1 40 


Fugt. Slave law repealed, 1864. 


14 


Thursday, 


4 58 


7 2 


2 12 


Stars and Stripes adopted, 1777. 


15 


Friday, 


4 58 


7 2 


2 46 


Washington elected Com. in Chief, 1775. 


16 


Saturday, 


4 58 


7 2 


3 24 


Great Eclipse, 1806. 



24) 4th Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke G. 



Day's length, I4h. 5m. 



17 


Sunday, 


4 58 


7 3 


4 6 


Battle Bunker Hill, 1775. 


18 


Monday, 


4 58 


7 3 


rises 


British evacuated Philadelphia, 1778. 


19 


Tuesday, 


4 59 


7 3 


8 38 


Maximilian shot. 1867. 


20 


Wednesday, 


4 58 


7 3 


9 20 


Marvland Colony chartered, 1632. 


21 


Thursdaj^ 


4 57 


7 4 


9 55 


Battle of Vittoria, 1813. 


22 


Friday, 


4 58 


7 4 


10 29 


The Greelv partv found. 1884. 


23 


Saturday, 


4 59 


7 4 


10 58 


Battle of Springheld, 1780. 



25j 5th Sunday after Trinity 



Sunday, 


5 


7 4 


11 25 


Monday, 


5 


7 4 


11 52 


Tuesday, 


5 


7 4 


morn 


Wednesday, 


5 1 


7 5 


20 


Thursday, 


5 1 


7 5 


51 


Friday, 


5 1 


7 5 


1 25 


Saturday, 


5 2 


7 5 


2 8 



Luke 5. Day's length, 14h. 4m. 

Midsummer. Printing discovered, 1440. 
First Methodist Conference, 1744. 
Simon Cameron died, 1889. 
Hiram Powers died, 1873. 

The Triple Alliance, Italy, Germany and Austria re- 
Siege Eouen began, 1418. [newedfor 6 years 1^91. 
Herr Cahensley's Memorial, 1891. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5654.— June 5, Eosh Chodesh Sivan ; 10 & 11, 

Shebuoth. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



11 



7th Month. 



JULY. 



31 Days. 



Calculated for the Latitude of the Southern. States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

New Moon 2d. llh. 45m. 

First Quarter 9d. 4h. 15m. 

Full Moon 17d. 4h. 3m. 

Last Quarter 25d. 3h. 7m. 



Evening. 
Evening. 
Evening. 
Evening. 



DAY 

OF 

Month and Week. 




CHRONOLOGY OF IMPORTANT EVENTS. 



26) 6th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matth. 5. 



Day's length, 14h. 3m. 



1 


Sunday, 


5 2 


7 5 


2 58 


Kailway to top of Pike's Peak opened, 1891. 


2 


Monday, 


5 2 


7 5 


3 59 


President Garfield shot, 1881. 


3 


Tuesday, 


5 3 


7 5 


sets 


Battle Sadowa, 1866. 


4 


Wednesday, 


5 3 


7 5 


8 55 


119th year Independence of the U. S. begins. 


5 


Thursday, 


5 4 


7 5 


9 37 


Battle Carthage, 1864. 


6 


Friday, 


5 4 


7 4 


10 12 


Treaty of London, 1827. 


7 


Saturday, 


5 5 


7 4 


10 43 


First American Congress at New York, 1765. 



27) 7th Sunday after Trinity. 



Marli 8. 



Day's length, 13h. 59m. 



8 


Sunday, 


5 5 


7 4 


11 14 


Edm. Burke died, 1797. 


9 


Monday, 


5 6 


7 4 


11 44 


President Taylor died, 1850. 


10 


Tuesday, 


5 6 


7 4 


morn 


Blackstone born, 1723. 


11 


Wednesday, 


5 7 


7 4 


14 


John Q. Adams born, 1767. 


12 


Thursday, 


5 7 


7 3 


46 


Orange Eiots in New York, 1871. 


13 


Friday, 


5 8 


7 3 


1 23 


Treaty of Berlin signed, 1878. 


14 


Saturday, 


5 8 


7 3 


2 5 


French Kevolution commenced, 1789. 



28) 8th Sunday after Trinity 



Matth. 7. 



Day's length, 13h. 53m. 



15 
16 
17 

18 
19 
20 
21 



Sunday, 


5 9 


7 2 


2 52 


Monday, 


5 9 


7 2 


3 42 


Tuesday, 


5 10 


7 2 


rises 


Wednesday, 


5 10 


7 1 


7 56 


Thursday, 


5 11 


7 1 


8 30 


Friday, 


5 11 


7 


9 


Saturday, 


5 12 


7 


9 23 



Tom Thumb died, 1883. 

Burr and Hamilton duel, 1804. 

Dr. Watts born, 1674. 

Papal infallibility decreed, 1870. 

Telegraph Strike, 1883. 

Am. Whist Congress Narragansett Pier, 1891. 

Battle of the Pyramids, 1798. 



29) 9th Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 16. 



Day's length, 13h. 46m. 



22 
23 
24 
25 

26 
27 

28 



Sunday, 


5 13 


6 59 


9 54 


Monday, 


5 13 


6 59 


10 21 


Tuesday, 


5 14 


6 58 


10 50 


Wednesday, 


5 14 


6 58 


11 21 


Thursday, 


5 15 


6 57 


11 59 


Friday, 


5 15 


6 57 


morn 


Saturday, 


5 16 


6 56 


45 



K. E. riots in Pittsburg, 1877. 

Gen. Burnside born, 1824. 

Mormons settled in Utah, 1845. 

25th or 27th Landing of Ciesar in England, 55 B. C. 

Robert Fulton born, 1765. 

Bank of England incorporated, 1694. 

Earthquake at Ischia, 1883. 



30) 10th Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 19. 



Day's length, 13h. 38m. 



29 
30 
31 



Sunday, 

Monday, 
Tuesday, 



5 17 


6 55 


1 39 


5 17 


6 55 


2 43 


5 18 


6 54 


3 56 



Niagara Bridge completed, 1848. 
Battle Pyrenees, 1813. 
Horatio Bonar died, 1889. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5654.— July 4 & 5, Eosh Chodesh Tamuz. 



12 



EICHA.RD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



8th Month. 



AUGUST. 



31 Days. 



Calcialated. for the Latitu.d.e of llie South-ern States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

New Moon Id. 

First Quarter 8d. 

Full Moon 16d. 

Last Quarter , •23d. 

New Moon 30d. 



6h. 


24 m. 


Morning. 


4h. 


5m. 


Morning. 


71i. 


17m. 


Morning. 


llh. 


lUm. 


Evening. 


2h. 


4m, 


Evening. 



DAY 

OF 

Month and Week. 



Sun 

rise 3 

h. m. 



Sun 

sets 

h. ni. 



Moon 
r, & s 

h. m. 



CHRONOLOG-Y OF IMrORTANT EVENTS. 



Wednesday, 


5 18 


6 53 


sets 


Thursday, 


5 19 


6 52 


8 7 


Friday, 


5 20 


6 52 


8 40 


Saturday, 


5 20 


6 51 


9 13' 



Battle of the Nile, 1798. 
Alabama adopted constitution, 1819. 
Columbus sailed on first voyage, 1492. 
Battle Mackinaw, 1814. 



31) 11th Sunday after Trinity, 



Luke 18. 



Day's length, 13h. 29m. 



5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 



Sunday, 

Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursda}^, 

Friday, 

Saturday, 



5 21 


6 50 


9 43 


5 21 


6 49 


10 14 


5 22 


6 48 


10 46 


5 23 


6 48 


11 22 


5 23 


6 47 


morn 


5 24 


6 46 


3 


5 25 


6 45 


48 



First Latin Bible printed, 1462. 

Atlantic Cable laid, 1866. 

Karl Formes born, 1818. 

Geo. Canning died, 1827. 

Ashburton treaty, 1842. 

Greenwich Observatory founded, 1675. 

Thad. Stevens died, 1868. 



32) 12th Sunday after Trinity. 



Mark 7. 



Day's length, 13h. 19m. 



12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 



Sunday, 

Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

Friday, 

Saturday, 



5 25 


6 44 


1 38 


5 26 


6 43 


2 32 


5 26 


6 42 


3 29 


5 27 


6 41 


4 27 


5 28 


6 40 


rises 


5 28 


6 39 


7 32 


5 29 


6 38 


7 38 



Dr. A. B. Mott died, 1889. 

Earthquake in Scotland, 1816. 

Mrs. Sarah C. Polk, widow President Polk, died, 

Order of Jesuits begun, 1534. [1891. 

Detroit surrendered, 1812. 

Frederick the Great died, 1786. 

Battle of Gravelotte, 1870. 



33) 13th Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 10. 



Day's length, 13h. 8m. 



19 


Sunday, 


5 29 


6 37 


8 25 


Judge J. S. Black died, 1883. 


20 


Monday, 


5 30 


6 36 


8 53 


President Benjamin Harrison born, 1833. 


21 


Ttiesday, 


5 30 


6 35 


9 24 


Niger Kiver expedition, 1841. 


22 


Wednesday, 


5 31 


6 34 


9 58 


Dr. F. J. Gall, founder of phrenology, died, 1828. 


^23 


Thursday, 


5 32 


6 33 


10 39 


Captain Jack sentenced, 1873. 


24 


Friday, 


5 32 


6 32 


11 29 


Wilberforce born, 1759. 


25 


Saturday, 


5 33 


6 31 


morn 


Henry Shaw died, 1889. 



34) 14th Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 17. 



Day's length, 12h. 56m. 



26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 



Sunday, 


5 33 


6 29 


27 


Monday, 


5 34 


6 28 


1 33 


Tuesday, 


5 34 


6 27 


2 45 


Wednesday, 


5 35 


6 26 


4 


Thursday, 


5 35 


6 25 


sets 


Friday, 


5 36 


6 24 


7 8 



Cannons first used, 1346. 
Earthquake in Java, 1883. 
Great Britain abolished slavery, 1833. 
Oliver AVendel Holmes born, 1809. 
2nd Battle of Bull Kun, 1862. 
John Bunyan died, 1683. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5654.— August 3, Kosh Chodesh Ab ; 12, Tisho beab ; 

17, Chamisho Osor. 







FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 








13 


9 th 


Month. 


SRPTEMBER. 






30 


Days. 




Calcu.lated for tlie Latitude of the Sou 

— — ^. — , — _— 


ithern 


States. 







MOON'S PHASES. 

First Quarter 6d. 7h. 

Full Moon 14d. lOh. 

Last Quarter 22d, 6li. 

New Moon 28d. llh. 



3m. Evening. 
21m. Evening. 
32m. Morning. 
44m. Evening. 



DAY 

OF 

Month and Week. 



Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


rises 


sets 


r. & s. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m 



CHRONOLOGY OF IMPORTANT EVENTS. 



Saturday, 



I 5 37 I 6 23 I 7 41 



French defeated at Sedan, 1870. 



35) 15th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matth. 17. 



Day's length, 12h. 44m. 



Siiiiday, 

Monda}^ 

Tuesday, 


5 37 

5 38 
5 38 


6 21 

6 25 
6 19 


8 11 

8 42 

9 19 


Wednesday, 


5 39 


6 18 


10 


Thursday, 
Friday, 


5 39 
5 40 


6 17 
6 15 


10 44 

11 32 


Saturday 


5 40 


6 14 


morn 



Great fire in London, 1666. 

Thiers died, 1877. 

French Republic proclaimed, 1870. 

Continental Congress met, 1774. 

Lafayette born, 1757. 

Castillar inaugurated, 1873. 

N. Pacific R. R. opened, 1883. 



36) 16th Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 7. 



Day's length, 12h. 32m. 



9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 



SuBiday, 


5 41 


6 13 


25 


Monday, 


5 42 


6 12 


1 21 


Tuesday, 


5 42 


6 10 


2 18 


Wednesday, 


5 43 


6 9 


3 15 


Thursday, 


5 43 


6 8 


4 13 


Friday, 


5 44 


6 7 


5 8 


Saturday, 


5 44 


6 6 


rises 



Francois Jules P. Gve\j, ex-Pres. I'rench Republic, 

Perry's victory, Lake Erie, 1813. [died, 1891. 

Hudson Bay discovered, 1609. 

Baltimore bombarded, 1814. 

Great fioods in Spain, 3000 lives lost, 1891. 

Corner Stone of 14th of September Monument laid, 

Postal Convention at Berne, 1874. [N. 0., 189L 



37) 17th Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 14. 



Day's length, 12h. 19m. 



16 


Siiiiday, 


5 45 


6 4 


6 57 


Revolution in Guatemala, 1891. 


17 


Monday, 


5 45 


6 3 


7 25 


U. S. Constitution adopted, 1787. 


18 


Tuesday, 


5 46 


6 2 


7 58 


Fugitive Slave Law, signed, 1850. 


19 


Wednesday, 


5 46 


6 1 


8 38 


Battle of Bemis Heights, 1777. 


20 


Thursday, 


5 47 


5 59 


9 24 


Alexander the Great born, 356 B. C. 


21 


Friday, 


5 47 


5 58 


10 18 


Broderick killed, 1859. 


22 


Saturday, 


5 48 


5 57 


11 21 


Mormon Books revealed, 1827. 



3§) 18th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matth. 22. 



Day's length, 12h. 7m. 



23 


Sunday, 


5 49 


5 56 


morn 


Grace Greenwood born, 1823. 


24 


Monday, 


5 49 


5 54 


30 


Battle of Monterey, 1846. 


25 


Tuesday, 


5 50 


5 53 


1 42 


EHzaCook, poet., died, 1889. 


26 


Wednesday, 


5 50 


5 52 


2 53 


Holy Alliance ratified, 1815. 


27 


Thursday, 


5 51 


5 51 


4 2 


Steamer Arctic lost, 1854. 


28 


Friday, 


5 51 


5 49 


5 3 


Brazil abolished slavery, 1871. 


29 


Saturday, 


5 52 


5 48 


sets 


Andre- tried as a spy, 1780. 



39) 19th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matth. 9. 



Day's length, llh. 5om. 



30 Sunday, i 5 52 I 5 47 6 39 



General Boulanger suicided, 1891. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5654.— September 1 & 2, Rosh Chodesh Elul. 



11 



RICHAKD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



10th Month 



OCTOBER. 



31 Days. 



Calculated for th.e Latitu-de of the Soxxtliern. States 



MOON'S PHASES. 

First Quarter 6d. 

Full Moon 14d. 

Last Quarter 21d. 

New Moon " 28d. 



Ih. 


Im. 


Evening. 


Oh. 


41m. 


Morning 


Oh. 


56 m. 


Morning. 


Ih. 


57m. 


Morning. 



DAY 

(iF 

Month and Week. 



Sun 
rises 

h. m. 



Sun 

sets 



Moon 

r. & s 

h. m. 



CHRONOLOGY OF IMPORTANT EVENTS. 



Monday, 


5 53 


5 46 


7 13 


Tuesday, 


5 53 


5 45 


7 51 


Wednesday, 


5 54 


5 43 


8 34 


Thursday, 


5 55 


5 42 


9 23 


Friday, 


5 55 


5 41 


10 15 


Saturday, 


5 56 


5 40 


11 10 



Disastrous Equinoxial Storm in Louisiana 1893, over 

Major Andre executed, 1780. [2000 Lives lost. 

Kuth Cleveland born, 1891. 

Mrs. Gatty, "Aunt Judy," died, 1873. 

Crystal Palace, N. G., burned, 1858. [1891, 

Wm. Henry Smith, First Lord of the Treasury, died. 



40) 20th Sunday after Trinity, 



Matth. 22. 



Day's length, llh. 42m. 



9 

10 
11 
12 
13 



l§uiiclay, 

Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

Friday, 

Saturday, 



5 57 


5 39 


morn 


5 57 


5 37 


8 


5 58 


5 36 


1 7 


5 58 


5 35 


2 3 


5 59 


5 34 


2 59 


6 


5 33 


3 55 


6 


5 32 


4 51 



Edgar A. Poe died, 1849. 

Alaska ceded to the United States, 1867. 

Achille Perelli, painter and sculptor, died inN. 0., 

First Overland Mail, 1858. [1891. 

The Bahamas discovered, 1492. 

Gen. K. E. Lee died, 1870. 

Joachin Murat shot, 1815. 



41) 21st Sunday after Trinity. 



Matth. 9. 



Day's length, llh. 30m. 



14 
15 

16 
17 

18 
19 
20 



Sunday, 


6 1 


5 31 


5 49 


Monday, 


6 2 


5 30 


rises 


Tuesday, 


6 3 


5 29 


6 37 


Wednesday, 


6 3 


5 27 


7 22 


Thursday, 


6 4 


5 26 


8 14 


Friday, 


6 4 


5 25 


9 14 


Saturday, 


6 5 


5 24 


10 21 



Battle of Jena, 1806. 

Napoleon arrived at St. Helena, 1815. 

Sailors U.S. Steamship Baltimore mobbed at Valpa- 

James Partin, writer, died, 1891. [raiso, 1891. 

Convent of Franciscan Poor Clare Nuns, dedicated 

Battle of Yorktown, 178i. [N, 0., 1891. 

Grace Darling died, 1842. 



42) 22d Sunday after Trinity. 



Matth. 18. 



Day's length, llh. 17m. 



21 

22 
23 
24 
25 

26 

27 



Sunday, 


6 6 


5 23 


11 31 


Monday, 


6 6 


5 22 


morn 


Tuesday, 


6 7 


5 21 


30 


Wednesday, 


6 8 


5 20 


1 47 


Thursday, 


6 9 


5 19 


2 54 


Friday, 


6 9 


5 18 


3 56 


Saturday, 


6 10 


5 17 


4 59 



Statue of Henry W. Grady unveiled, 1891. 

Revocation of Edict of Nantes, 1685. 

A. H. Davenport died, 1873. 

Pacific Telegraph completed, 1861. 

Chancer died, 1400. 

Hogarth died, 1765. 

Anti Jewish riots in Russia, 1891. 



43) 23d Sunday after Trinity. 



Matth. 22. 



Day's length, llh. 6m. 



28 


Sunday, 


6 11 


5 17 


6 3 


The N. W. Passage discovered, 1850. 


29 


Monday, 


6 12 


5 16 


sets 


Surrender of Metz, 1870. 


30 


Tuesday, 


6 12 


5 15 


6 29 


Gambetta born, 1838. 


31 


AVednesday, 


6 13 


5 14 


7 13 


Hallowe'en. Nevada made a State, 1864. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5655.— October 1 & 2, Kosh Hashonah ; 10, Yom 
Kippur ; 15 & 16, First days Suckoth ; 23, Simchas Torah ; 30 & 31, Rosh Chodesh 

Marcheshwan. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



15 



11th Month. 



NOVEMBER. 



30 Days. 



Calciala-ted fox* tlie Latitude of the SoTztlnern States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

First Quarter 5d. 9h. 

Full Moon 13d. Ih. 

Last Quarter 19d. 8h. 

New Moon .27d. 2h. 



16m. Morning. 

49m. Morning. 

8m. Evening. 

54m. Morning. 



DAY 

OF 

Mouth aud Week. 



Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


rises 


sets 


r. & s. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


6 14 


5 13 


8 5 


6 15 


5 12 


9 


6 15 


5 12 


9 57 



CHRONOLOGY OF IMPORTANT EVENTS. 



1 Thursday, 

2 j Friday, 

3 Saturday, 



All Saints' Day. 

Erie Canal finished, 1825. 

Bryant, poet, born, 1794. 



44) 24tli Sunday after Trinity. 



Matth. 9. 



Day's length. lOh. 55m. 



4 


ISunday, 


6 16 


5 11 


10 54 


Calhoun entered Congress, 1811. 


5 


Monday, 


6 17 


5 10 


11 50 


The American 74 launched, 1782. 


6 


Tuesday, 


6 18 


5 9 


morn 


Abraham Lincoln elected president, 1860. 


7 


Wednesday, 


6 18 


5 9 


46 


Battle Tippecanoe, 1811. 


• 8 


Thursday, 


6 19 


5 8 


1 42 


Cortez entered Mexico, 1519. 


9 


Friday, 


6 20 


5 7 


2 38 


Prince of Wales born, 1841. 


10 


Saturday, 


6 21 


5 7 


3 34 


Catholic Centenary, 1889. 



45) 25th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matth. 24. 



Day's length, lOh. 44m. 



11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 



Sunday, 


6 22 


5 6 


4 35 


Monday, 


6 23 


5 6 


5 40 


Tuesday, 


6 23 


5 5 


rises 


Wednesday, 


6 24 


5 5 


6 4 


Thursday, 


6 25 


5 4 


7 4 


Friday, 


6 26 


5 4 


8 12 


Saturday, 


6 27 


5 3 


9 22 



Session Am. Bankers Association in New Orleans, 

Don Piatt, journalist, died, 1891. [1891. 

California Constitution adopted, 1849. 

Leibnitz died, 1716. 

Brazil declared a Kepublic, 1889. 

John Bright born, 1811. 

First Congress in Washington, 1800. 



46) 26th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matth. 25. 



Day's length, lOh. 35m. 



Sunday, 

Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

Friday, 



18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 i Saturday, 



6 28 


5 


3 


10 32 


6 28 


5 


3 


11 40 


6 29 


5 


2 


morn 


6 30 


5 


2 


45 


6 31 


5 


2 


1 48 


6 32 


5 


1 


2 49 


6 33 


5 


1 


3 51 



Standard Time adopted, 1883. 

William J. Florence, actor, died, 1891. 

United States treaty with England, 1794. 

Treaty of Stockholm, 1855. 

Professor Dugold Stewart born, 1753. 

Charlotte Cushman, actor, born, 1816. 

Earl Lytton (Owen Meredith), died, Paris, 1891. 



4^) 27th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matth. 15. 



Day's length, lOh. 28m. 



25 


Sunday, 


6 33 


5 1 


4 54 


New York evacuated, 1783. 




26 


Monday, 


6 34 


5 1 


5 56 


Sojourner Truth died, 1883. 




27 


Tuesday, 


6 35 


5 


sets 


Pacific Ocean discovered by Balboa, 1520. 




28 


^^ ednesday. 


6 36 


5 


5 56 


Washington Irving died, 1859. 




29 


Thursday, 


6 37 


5 


6 49 


Golden jubilee of Archbisho]D Kenrick, St. 


Louis, 


30 


Friday, 


6 38 


5 


7 46 


Charter Suez Canal, 1854. 


[1891. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5655.— November 29, Kosh Chodesh Kislev. 



16 



EICHARD FKOTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



12th Month. 



DECEMBER, 



31 Days. 



Calcxalated for tlie Latit-ucle of" the SoiitlierrL States. 



MOON'S PIEASES. 

First Quarter od. 6h. 

Full Moon 12d. Ih. 

Last Quarter 19d. oh. 

New Moon ' 26d. 8h. 



lorn. 3Iorning-. 
•i6m. Evening. 
16m. Morning, 
20m. Evening. 





DAY 

OF 

Month and Week. 


Snn 

rises 

li. m. 


Snn 

sets 

h. m. 


Moon 
r. >k s. 

h. m. 


CHEOXOLOGY OF IMPORT AXT EVENTS. 


1 SatuxdaT, 


6 39 5 


8 M j Princess of Wales born, 1844. 


48) 1st Sunday 


in Advent. 


Matth. 21. Day's length, lOh. 21m. 



Siiaiday, 

Monday, 

Tuesday, 

Wednesday, 

Thursday, 

Friday, 

Satiu-day, 



6 39 


5 





9 40 


6 40 


5 





10 35 


6 41 


5 





11 30 


6 42 


5 


1 


morn 


6 43 


5 


1 


26 


6 43 


5 


1 


1 21 


6 44 


5 


1 


2 18 



John Brown, hung 1859. 

Illinois admitted as a State, 1818. 

WiUiam Henry Harrison nominated, 1839. 

Kossuth arrived in the U. S., 1851. 

Jefferson Da^ds died, 1889. 

Washington's farewell to Congress, 1796. [Tii-gin. 

Feast of the Immaculate Conception of Blessed 



49) 2d Sunday in Advent. 



Luke 22. 



Day's length, lOh. 16m. 



9 


SuBiclay, 


6 45 


5 1 


3 18 


John ^Vinton born. 1608. 


10 


Monday, 


6 45 


5 1 


4 24 


Oliver Johnson died, 1889. 


11 


Tuesday. 


6 46 


5 1 


5 32 


Indiana admitted as a State, 1816. 


12 


Wednesday, 


6 47 


5 2 


rises 


Eobert Browning died, 1889. 


13 


Thursday, 


6 47 


5 2 


5 53 


Battle Fredricksburg, 1862. 


14 


Friday, 


6 48 


5 2 


7 5 


Anthonv Wavne died, 1796. 


15 


Saturday, 


6 49 


5 3 


8 20 


Geneva Tribunal, 1871. 



50) 3d Sunday in Advent. 



30 
31 



Matth. 11. 



Day's length, luh. 14m. 



16 


Siisetiay, 


6 49 


5 


3 


9 31 


Boston Tea Party 1773. 


17 


Monday. 


6 50 


5 


3 


10 37 


John G. Whittier born, 1807. 


18 


Tuesday, 


6 50 


5 


4 


11 42 


Thirteenth Amendment ratified, 1865. 


19 


Wednesday, 


6 51 


5 


4 


morn 


Bayard Taylor died, 1878. 


20 


Thursday, 


6 51 


5 


4 


44 


South Carolina seceded. 1860. 


21 


Friday, 


6 52 


5 


5 


1 46 


Benjamin Disraeli born, 1805. 


22 


Saturday, 


6 52 


5 


5 


2 47 


Yale College founded, 1700. 



51) 


4th Sunday 


in Advent. 




John 1. Day's length, lOh. 


13m. 


23 


Sun clay, 


6 53 


5 6 


3 48 


Henry Y'. Gradv died. 1889. 




24 


Monday, 


6 53 


5 7 


4 49 


Edwin M. Staunton cUed, 1869. 




25 


Tuesday, 


6 54 


5 7 


5 49 


Christmas Day. 




26 


AYednesday, 


6 54 


5 8 


6 45 


Stephen Girard died, 1831. 




27 


Thursday, 


6 54 


5 8 


sets 


St. John. Evangelist. 




28 


Friday, 


6 55 


5 9 


6 35 


Macaulev died, 1859. 




29 


Saturday, 


6 55 


5 10 


7 32 


Yiniam E. Gladstone born, 1809. 





52) Sunday after Christmas. 



Luke 2. 



Day's length, lOh. 15m. 



Sunday, 

Monday, 



6 55 


5 10 


8 28 


6 56 


5 11 


9 23 



New Mexico bought, 1853. 
Battle of Murfi-ee^sboro, 1862. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5655.— December 23, Chanukah ; 
28, Eosh Chodesh Tebet. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 17 



A Few Remarks on Raising Vegetables for Shipping. 

AVithin the past few years the raising of early vegetables for shipping West has become 
quite au item in the neighborhood of New Orleans and is assuming larger proportions every 
year. We have advantages here, which are not found elsewhere, for that branch of industry. 
Freights have been reduced to all points from here, and special cars, built expressly for car- 
rying green vegetables and fruit, have been put on the railroads. We are earlier here than 
at any other point, and with the rich ground we have, and the large supply of manure to be 
had for the hauling only, early vegetables can be raised very successfully. 

Almost every kind of vegetables are shipped from here, but Beans, Cucumbers, Beets, Toma- 
toes, Cabbage and Peas form the bulk of shipment. For Beans, the Dwarf Wax, Improved 
Valentine and "Best of AU" are principally planted for shipping purposes; the latter carry well 
and lind ready sale. The Wax varieties do well in a dry season, but in a wet one the}- are apt 
to spot, which makes them untit for shipping. The Wardwell's Kidney Wax and dwarf Flage- 
olet have the preference amongst the dwarf sorts. The Flageolet Wax Pole is the best kind 
and follows the dwarf varieties in close succession. If they have had a good season to grow, 
so they arrive in good order at destination, they will sell higher than any other variety. The 
Crease Back— a green podded Pole Beau introduced here by me— is well adapted for ship- 
ping. It is very "early and will follow the Dwarf Beans closely in maturing. Thousands of 
bushels of green pods are shipped from here to the Western markets. They are generally 
stenciled "Mobile Beans," which name is wrongly applied. Very few of this variety are planted 
at that place. 

In the way of Cucumbers, the Improved White Spine and New Orleans Market are the best 
varieties, as they bear abundantly, keep their color better, and are superior for shipping to any 
other. I have been supplying the largest growers in this vicinity in that line with seed, the 
stock of which cannot be surpassed in quality. Of Beets only the clark red Blood Turnip or the 
Egyptian should be planted for shipping purposes. The Egyptian is a very quick growing 
variety, and should not be sown quite so early as the Blood Turnip, which ought to be sown 
in September and October; for the former variety, January is time enough. The strain of 
Beets which I have been selling for years is raised for me in Connecticut; it is dark red, very 
early and cannot be surpassed for shipping purposes. 

For Tomatoes, the Extra Early Dwarf comes in bearing first, but should be i^lanted only 
for the first crop, as when large varieties come in the market, the former do not sell as well. 
Great improvements have been made of late years in Tomatoes; the varieties raised and intro- 
duced by Livingston's Sons are perfect, and hardly any improvement can be made on such 
varieties as the Paragon, Favorite, Acme and Beauty. New Orleans is not a good point to ship 
Tomatoes from, as they hardly ever arrive at destination in good condition. Along the Jackson 
R. B,., where the land is more sandy, a better article is raised for shipping. Lettuce is shipped 
quite extensively; the New Orleans Improved Passion is used principally for that purpose. 

Potatoes and Onions are shipped in large quantities, but the former are very uncertain in 
regard to prices. Potatoes have not been a good or pajung crop the past season. Those raised 
on flie upper and lower coast arrived in good order; but the bulk which came from Lafourche 
to this market did not arrive in as good condition as in former years. Some were destroyed by 
the crevasse, others were dug too green for fear that they would be inundated by the 
api^roaching water. Price was low all the season through. 

The Onion crop was large, quality good. The Bermuda seed produced nice onions, but 
they will not keejr, in fact they are only good for very early shipping or home use and market. 
For this section there is only one reliable kind, and that is the Creole. 

The Cabbage crop was good and sold at remunerative prices, both Fall and Spring crops. 
For Fall we use the Superior Flat Dutch, Crescent City and Stein's Flat Dutch, and a small 
percentage of earlier varieties, such as Brunswick, Early Summer, Early Flat Dutch and Early 
Drumhead. 

For Spring, Improved Early Summer and Brunswick are used almost exclusively. The 
surest way is to sow the seeds during November in cold frames or in at least a sheltered place, 
where they can be protected from cold in case of necessity. Beets paid well. Cucumbers 
raised in frames brought good prices. Those planted in the open ground were attacked by a 
fungus which shortened the crop about this vicinity and coast. At Grand Isle there was a 
good crop made; planters there used Tobacco Dust in large cj^uan titles, which destroyed the 
insects. Peas and Beans paid well. However the shipping of these did not last long. 

The Musk Melon crop was very large, but owing to the continued rains the quality was 
impaired. Very few choice ones came to the market. The Osage Melon, so highly prized in 
the West, will never become a favorite here. The roughly netted New Orleans Market sort has 
no equal in a favorable season in size or luscious flavor. Thej^ brought higher prices than 
any other kind when shipped from here to Chicago. Some fields were attacked by same kind 
of fungus which injured the cucumber crop, and thereby impaired the quality of the melons. 
Carrots are shipped in considerable quantities; the half -long varieties are generally used for 
that purpose. Tomatoes paid well. Of late a good many Eggplants are shipped; they have 
paid well; for this purpose I recommend the New Orleans Market variety, which stands the 

2 



18 RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 

heat well, and the fruit carries better when shipped than the Xew York Market. The kind we 
cultivate here is oblong, dark purple; perfectly thornless on the stems and leaves. Radishes 
for shipping are raised considerably. The Long Scarlet short top is used for that purpose. 

Gardeners and othei*s who contemplate raising vegetables for shipping are invited to give 
me a call. From the fact that all staj)le articles are raised for me by contract, in such sections 
best suited to mature the varieties we need for our climate, and the interest I take in the seed 
business, coupled with a thorough knowledge of same, enables me to assist in making selec- 
tions of seeds for the purpose. The interest of my customers and mine are identical. My 
stock is the best selected «.nd largest in the South. 

THE VEGETABLE GARDEN. 



The size depends upon the purposes for which it is intended; whether the family is large or 
small, and the time which can be devoted to its cultivation. The most suitable soil for a garden 
is a light loam. When the soil is too heavy, it ought to be made light by apphing stable manure 
and working up the ground thoroughly. Trenching as done in Europe, or Xorth, is not advis- 
able, at least where there is any cocoa, as by trenching the roots of this pest will get so deeply 
incorporated with the soil that trouble will be met with afterwards to get rid of it. Exposure 
towards the East is desirable. If there are one or more large trees in the garden, or on the 
immediate outside, their shade can be used in which to sow Celery, Cabbage and other seeds 
during the hot summer months, which will be an advantage. The seed beds for this purpose 
should be so arranged as to receive onlv the morning or evening sun. It is of the greatest 
importance that the gTOund should be well drained, otherwise it ^ill be impossible to raise good 
vegetables. The most rehable manure for general purposes is well decomposed stable or barn- 
yard manure. Cow manure will suit best for hght, sandy soil, and horse niannre for heawv', 
stilf clay lands. For special purposes Peruvian Guano, Commercial Fertilizer, Eaw Bone, Cotton 
Seed Meal and other commercial manures maybe employed with advantage. Of late years most 
gardeners who work theii' land with a plow, use Cow peas as a fertilizer ^^ith excellent result. 
They are sown broad-cast at the rate of I5 bushels to the acre, and when large enough, they are 
turned under. When the land is very sandy, cotton seed meal has the most lasting elf ect. For 
quick grovdng crops, such as Melons, Cucumbers, etc., the Commercial Fertilizer and Guano 
applied in the hills are very good. Soap suds are good for Celery; it is astonishing to perceive 
the difference in the size of those stalks which are watered every few days with the suds, and 
others on the same ground which are not. Wood ashes are best for Peas, either used as a top 
dressing when the Peas just come out of the ground, or else sprinkled in the rows when planted. 
The New Orleans market gardeners raise as fine vegetables as can be produced anywhere: in 
fact, , some varieties cannot be excelled, and very few gardeners use anything but stable manure. 

" Rotation of" Crops is another important item. Beets, Carrots and other roots should 
not be gn'own in succession on the same ground, but should be changed to those which grow 
above ground, such as Lettuce, Beans, Peas, etc. Good seed, good ground and good cultivation 
are essential in order to raise good vegetables. When plants are ui3, the ground should be stirred 
fi-equently; weeds ought not to be suffered to go into seed, but should be destroyed as soon as 
they appear. Hoeing and working the young crops during dry weather is very beneficial, 
because the weeds are then easil}" killed, and hoeing the ground will make it retain moistui-e 
better than if it were left alone. 



SOWING SEEDS. 



Some seeds are sown at once where they are to remain and mature. Others are sown in 
seed beds and transplanted afterwards. Seeds should be covered according to their sizes, a 
covering of earth tT\ice the size of the seed is about the maximum. Some seeds, such as Beans, 
Corn and Peas, can be covered from one to two inches, and they will come up well. Here is a 
difference again : Wrinkled Peas and Sugar Corn have to be covered lighter and more carefully 
than Marrowfat Peas or the common varieties of Corn. It depends upon the nature of the soil, 
season of the year, etc. For instance, in heavy wet soils seeds have to be covered lighter than 
in sandy light ground. Seeds which are sown during summer in the open ground, such as 
Beets and Carrots, should be soaked over night in water and rolled in ashes or j^laster before 
sowing; they will come up quicker. When they are sown in a seed bed, the ground should be 
light enough not to bake after a rain. Some varieties of seeds require shade when sown during 
the summer, such as CauUflower, Celery and Lettuce. Care should be taken to have the shade 
at least three feet from the ground, and shade only after the sun has been on the bed for two 
or three hours; and remove again early in the afternoon, so the plants may become sturdy. If 
too much shaded they will be drawn up, long-legged, and not fit to be set out in the open 
gronnd. The most successful cabbage planters in this neighborhood sow theii- seeds in the 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



19 



open ground, towards the end of July and during August, and give them no shade but water, 
and keep the ground moist from the day of sowing till the plants are transplanted. Seeds should 
be sown thinly in the seed bed. If plants come up too thickly they are apt to damp off. 

Lettuce seed should be sprouted during the hot months before sowing, according to direc- 
tions given for June. 

To sow Turnips on a large scale during the late summer and early fall months, the ground 
should be prepared in advance, and the seed sown just before or during rain. Small pieces of 
ground, of course, can be sown at any time and watered afterwards. For covering all kinds of 
seeds, a fork is preferable to a rake; with either implement, care must be taken not to 
cover the seeds too deep. Beans, Peas and Corn are covered with the hoe. Some fine seeds, 
such as Thyme or Tobacco, are covered enough when pressed with the back of the spade to the 
ground. The seedsman is often blamed for selling seeds which have not come up, when the 
same are perfectly good; but, perhaps, through ignorance the party by whom they were sown, 
placed them too deep or too shallow in the ground, or the ground may have been just moist 
enough to swell the seeds, and they failed to come up. At other times washing rains after 
sowing beat the ground and form a crust that the seeds are not able to penetrate, or if there is 
too much fresh manure in_^the ground, it will burn the seeds and destroy its vitality. 

When seeds, such as Beans, Cucumbers, Melons and Squash, are planted before it is warm 
enoiigh, they are very apt to rot if it rains. 



■ ' flj It iiT> |> dlBI" 




THE HOT BED. 



Owing to the open winters in the South, hot beds are not so much used as in the North, 
except to raise such tender plants as Egg-Plants, Tomatoes and Peppers. There is little forc- 
ing of vegetables done here, except as regards Cucumbers and Lettuce; and, if we do not have 
any hard frosts, the latter does better in the open ground than under glass. To make a hot 
bed is a very simple thing. Any one who has the use of tools can make the wooden frame; the 
sashes may be obtained from any sash factory. I consider a wooden frame from five to six feet 
wide and ten feet six inches long a very good size. It should be at least six inches higher at 
the back than ip the front, and covered by three sashes SjxS feet. The manure ought not to 
be over one month old; it should be thrown together in a heap, and when commencing to heat, 
be worked over with a fork, and the long and short manure evenly mixed. In this State the 
ground is generally low, and to retain the heat of the manure for a long time it is best to put 
the manure on top of the ground — that is, make a bank two feet longer and two feet wider than 
the frame. Keep the edges straight and the corners firm; when thrown up about eighteen 
inches trample the. manure down to six or eight inches, then put on another layer of eighteen 
inches and trample down again; place thereon the frame and sash, and fill in six inches of good 
earth. After about five days stir the ground to kill the weeds which may have come up, then 
sov\- the seeds. In lower Louisiana the ground is too wet to dig out eighteen inches deep, 
throw in the manure and trample down as recommended in the North; by a few hard rains, 
such as we frequently have in winter, the manure would become so soaked beneath the ground 
that the heat would be gone. Another advantage, when the frame is put above the ground, is, 
that it will go down with the manure graduall}', and there remains always the same space be- 
tween the glass and the ground. If the ground is dug out and the manure put into the frame, 
the ground will sink down so low, after a short time, that the sun will have little effect upon 
it. and plants will become spindly. 



20 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



Seeds requisite to produce a given number of Plants and sow a given 

amount of ground, 



Quantity 
per acre. 

1 oz. to 500 plants ^2 lb. 

1 oz. to :^00 plants o lbs. 



1^ 



Artichoke. 
Asparagus, 

Barley - . ■ ■ 

Beans, d^varf. 1 quart to 150 feet of drill 
Beans, pole. 1 quart to 200 hills. . 

Beet, garden, 1 oz. to 100 feet of drill 10 

Beet, Mangel, 1 oz. to 150 feet of drill. 6 

Broccoli. 1 oz. to 3,000 plants 

Broom Corn. 

Brussels Sprouts, 1 oz. to 3,000 plants 

Buckwheat 

*Cahbage, 1 oz. to 3,000 plants 

Carrot. 1 oz. to 250 feet of drill . ... 

*Caulifiower. 1 oz. to 3,000 plants 

*Celerv. 1 oz. to lO.OuO plants ... 

Clover, Alsike and \N hite Dutch. 

Lucerne, Large Red tt Crimson 
Trefoil 

" Medium ... 

■*Collards, 1 oz. to 2.500 plants 

Corn, sweet. 1 quart to 500 hills . 
Cress. 1 oz. to 15C feet of drill 
Cucumber. 1 oz. t.) 80 hills . . 

Egg Plant, 1 oz. to 2,00i) plants 

Endive. 1 oz. to 300 feet of drill 

Flax, broadcast. ' . . .... 

(TOurd.JL oz. to 25 hills 

Grass. Blue Kentucky. ... . . 

" Blue English . 

" Hungarian and Millet 

'• Mixed Lawn. 

" Orchard. Perennial Rye, Red Top, 
Fowl Meadow and Wood Meadow . 

* The above calculations are made 



lbs. 



o oz. 

10 lbs. 

5 oz. 

y^ bu. 

5 oz. 
2i< lbs 
5" oz. 
•4 
6 



lbs 



5 lbs. 
injbs. 

6 oz. 
8 qts. 
S lbs. 



1^4 



Quantity 
per acre". 

Garlic, bulbs. 1 lb. to 10 feet of drill 

Hemp 

Kale. 1 oz. to 3.000 plants . 

Kohl-Rabi. 1 oz. to 2OO feet of drill 

Leek. 1 oz. to 2.50 feet of drill . 

Lettuce. 1 oz. to 2-50 feet of drill 

Melon, Musk. L oz. to 100 hills ... 1|^ 

Melon, Water, » oz. to 25 hills 

Nasturtium. 1 oz. to 50 feet of drill 

Oats. .. 

Okra. 1 oz. to S'"^ feet of drill 

Onion Seed, i oz to 200 feet of drill .... 

" " for Sets 

Onion Sets. ' quart to 20 feet of drill. S 

Parsnip, L oz. to 250 feet of drill .. ., 5 

Parsley. 1 oz. to 2.50 feet of drill 8 •• 

Peas, garden, 1 quart to 150 feet of drill... l^^bu. 

•' field 2V2 •• 

Pepper, 1 oz. to 1,500 plants 4" oz. 



lihu. 
4 oz. 
P.abs. 
4 " 



10" " 

214 bu. 
10 lbs. 



4 
30 



bu. 
lbs. 



double the quantity to give the same amount of plants. 



Potatoes 10 bu. 

Pumpkin. 1 quart to 300 hills 4 qts. 

Radish. 1 oz. to 150 feet of drill 8 lbs. 

Rye 13-2 hu. 

oz Salsify. 1 oz. to 60 feet of drill S lbs. 

lbs. Spinach, i oz. to 150 feet of drill 10 •• 

: bu. Summer Savory. 1 oz. to 500 feet of drill.. 2 

jibs Squash, summer, 1 oz. to 40 hills 2 

'bu. " winter. 1 oz. to 10 hills 3 •• 

Tomato. 1 oz. to 3.000 plants 3 oz. 

^ " Tobacco. 1 oz. to 5.000 plants 2 

"" Turnip. 1 oz. to 250 feet of drill 13^ lbs. 

Vetches. .. 2 bu. 

Wheat ... . . . 1 to 2 •• 

for sowing in the spring; during the summer it requires 



Number of Plants or Trees to the Acre at given distances, 



Dis. apart. Xo. Plants. 
3^ foot 174,240 

1 " 43,560 

13^ feet 19.360 

2 " 30,890 

21^ " 6.969 

3 feet bv 1 foot. ... \ 4,520 
3 " 2 feet.... 7,260 



Dis. apart. Xo. Plants 



feet bv 3 feet. . 

1 foot. 

2 feet . 

3 '■ . 

4 " . 



4.S40 
10,888 
5,444 
3.629 
2.7i2 
1.742 



Dis. apart. Xo. Plants. 

6 feet 1,210 

7 " . ... 889 

8 " 680 

9 • • 573 

10 •• 435 

11 •• 360 



Dis. apart. Xo. Plants. 
12 feet. 302 



15 
18 
20 
25 
30 



193 

134 

108 

69 

4<> 



Standard Weight of Various Articles, 



Apples 

dried 

Barley , 

Beans 

Buckwheat 

Broom Corn 

Blue Grass. Kentuckv 

" English..". 

Bran 

Canary Seed 

Castor Beans 

Clover Seed 

Corn, shelled 

" on ear 

Corn Meal 

Charcoal 

Coal, Mineral 

Cranberries 

Dried Peaches 

Flax Seed 

Hemp Seed 

Hungarian Grass Seed 

Irish Potatoes, heaping measure. 

Millet 

Malt 

Oats 

Osage Orange 

Orchard Grass 



per bush. 



48 lbs 


22 




48 




60 




48 




46 




14 




24 




20 




60 




46 




60 




56 




70 




50 




•» 




80 




40 




28 




56 




44 




48 




60 




50 




38 




32 


" 


33 


" 


14 


" 



Onions per bush. 54 lbs. 

Peas. '• 60 •' 

Plastering Hair •' 8 " 

Rape " .50 " 

Rve " 56 " 

Red Top Seed '' ]4 -' 

Salt. Coarse •• 50 " 

Salt. Michigan •• 56 " 

Sweet Potatoes • .56 " 

Timothy Seed •• 45 " 

Turnips •' 58 " 

Wheat ■• 60 " 

Beef and Pork, per bbl., net 200 " 

Flour, per bbl.. net 196 " 

White Fish and Trout, per bbl., net 200 " 

Salt, per bbl 280 ■• 

Lime. " 220 •' 

Hay. Avell settled, per cubic foot 4,12' 

Corn, on cob. in bin " 22"" 

shelled " •' 45 " 

Wheat. " ■• 48 " 

Oats, " " 25^" 

Potatoes. " •' 3812" 

Sand. dry. '• 95 " 

Clav. compact. " 1:>5 " 

Marble. •■ ... 169 " 

Seasoned Beech Wood, per cord 5.616 •■ 

Hickorv, " 6,960 ■- 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



21 



DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE OF VEGETABLE SEED. 




ARTICHOKE. 

Aktichaut (Fr,), Aktischoke {Crer.), Alcachofa (Sp.). 

L.arge Oreeii Olobe. This 
is ii very popiilar vegetaMe in the 
Soiith, and much esteemed hy the 
native as well as the foreign popula- 
tion from the South of Europe. It is 
extensively cultivated for the New 
Orleans market. It is best propagated 
from suckers which come up around 
the large jjlants. Take them olf 
during the fall and early winter 
months; plant them four feet apart 
each way. Every fall the ground 
should be manured and spaded or 
plowed between them; at the same 
time the suckers should be taken off. 
If planted by seed, sow them in drills 
during winter or early spring, three 
inches apart and one foot from row 
to row; cover with about one half inch 
of earth. The following fall the 
plants can be transplanted and culti- 
vated as recommended above. The 
seeds I offer are imported by me from 
Italy, and of superior quality; I can 
also furnish sprouts or plants in the 
fall of the year, at Si. 50 per 100. Green Globe Artichoke. 

The E»rly Cailipailim I have dropped from the list; it is not hardy enough for our 
section. Dies out during summer when we have hard rains. 

ASPARAGUS. 

AsPEEGE (Fr.), Spakgel (Ger.), Espajragos (Sp.). 

Coiiover's Colossal. The Asparagus is not extensively cultivated in the South; not 
that it is not liked well enough, but from the fact that it does not succeed as well as in more 
Northern latitudes. It seems that it is short-lived, the roots giving out soon or throwing up 
very small shoots. 

The ground should be well manured and prepared before either the roots or seeds are 
planted. For this climate the sowing of seed is preferable. Roots are generally imported from 
the North, and I have found that the roots raised here, one year old, are as strong as those 
received from the North, three j^ears old. Plant the seed in early spring. Soak over night in 
water; plant in rows, or rather hills, one foot apart and two feet between; put from four to five 
seeds in each hill; when well up thin out to two plants. The following winter, when the stalks 
are cut oft", cover with a heavy coat of well rotted manure and a sprinkling of salt; fishbrine will 
answer the same purpose. In the spring fork in the manure between the rows, and keep clean 
of weeds. The same treatment should be repeated every year. The bed should not be cut before 
being three years established. Care must be taken not to cut the stalks too soon in the fall of 
the year— not until we have had a frost. If cut before, it will cause the roots to throw up young 
shoots, which will weaken them. Roots, 75c. per 100; S6.00 per 1000. 

BUSH BEANS. 

CULTURE. 
Place in rows eighteen inches apart; drop a bean every two or three inches. Plant from end 
of Februar3% and for siiccession, every two or three weeks to May. Bush Beans planted in this 
latitude during June and July, will not produce much. August and September are good months 
in which to plant again; they will produce abundantly till killed by the frost. Do not cover the 
seeds more than two inches, ' , 

POLE BEANS. 

Lima Beans should not be planted before the ground has become warm in spring. Strong 
poles ought to be set in the ground from four to six feet apart, and the ground drawn around 
them before the seed is planted. It is always best to plant after a rain and with the eye of the 
bean down. The other varieties can be planted flat, and not more than three to four feet apart, 
and hilled after they are up. Do not cover the seeds more than two inches; one inch is enough 
for the Southern Prolific and Crease Back, 



22 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AXD GARDEN MANUAL 



BEANS. 

(DWAEF, SNAP or BUSH.) 

Haeicot (Fr.), Bohne (Ger.), Feijolexa>:o (Sp.). 



Pride of Newton. 

Early Valentine Bed Speckled. 

Early Mohawk Six Weeks. 

German Dwarf Wax. 

White Kidney. 

Early China Bed-Eye. 

Extra Early Befugee. 

Pride of TVewtoii. This is a rolDust, 
strong growing bean with, long fiat pods, which 
are light green. It is quite early and productive. 
The "bean is similar to the Yellow Six Weeks in 
color, but much hardier. 

Early Valentine, one of the best 
varieties; pods round, tender and quite pro- 
ductive; not much planted for the market. 
Excellent for shipping. 

Early xlloliawk Six Weeks. This 
is a long podded variety, and ver3" hardy. It 
is used to a large extent for the market for the 
first planting; very jDroductive. 



Bed Kidney. 

GreneWs Improved Dwarf Golden Wax. 

Best of All. 

Improved Valeritine. 

Wardicell's Dwaif Kidney Wax. 

Henderson's Dwarf Lima. 

Burpee's Bush Lima. 

Early Yellow Six TVeeks. This is 
the most popular sort among market gardeners. 
Pods flat and long; a very good bearer, but 
not so good for shipping as the Mohawk or 
Valentine. 

AViiate Kidney. A good strong grow- 
ino- varietv. not much planted. 

Early China Hed-Eye. Early and 
of good quality, but not very popular. 

Red Kidney. This kind is largely 
planted for the New Orleans market. It is a 
coarse growing variety, and much used for 
shelling when the pods turn yellow, so that 
the beans are well cleveloped, but yet soft. 





1 ride of Newton Beau. 



Dwarf Goldeu Wax Bean. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



23 



Best of All. A variety from Germany 
of great merit, iidroduced here by me. It is 
green podded, long and succulent; it is prolific 
and well flavored. An excellent variety for 
shipping and family nse. It is not quite so 
early as the Mohawk, but is of superior quality 
for shipping, and, therefore, is almost the only 
kind planted here for that purpose. The cut 
is a good representation as it grows; it shows 
only two-thirds of its natural size. Can not 
be too highly recommended. 

Improved V:ileiitiiie This variety 
has all the good qualities of the old Valentine; 
only, it is ten da3's earlier, a great consideration 
when planted for the market; it has taken the 
place of the old variety of Valentine. 

Heiadersoii's BeisSi Litiassi Beaiis. 
This is a dwarf Butter Bean which requires no 
poles, it grows from 18 to 24 inches high. It 
is early and productive. It should be called 
JDicarf Carolina or Sewee Beans, as the pods are 
the size of that variety. Recommend same 
for family use, or where it is diificult to obtain 
poles. 

Burpee's Bush Linta. Novelty of 
last year. The pods are of same size as the 



Large Pole Lima and of same flavor. It is a 
stronger grower than the Henderson's Bush 
Lima. 
Extra Early Refugee. Is an im- 

i:)rovement on the well-known old Refugee. 
It is very early and prolific. Owing to its 
good qualities, it has become a favorite with 
market gardeners for shipping. Pods round 
and flesh5\ 

lBBiprove<l F roll lie Divarf Oer- 
III a IB Wax. This variety is a great im- 
provement on its parent the Dwarf German 
Wax. Pods are longer and more productive, 
with the good qualities of the old kind, which 
was the fiist Wax Bean introduced here from 
Germany. 

GrretieSrs Isiiproved Kust Proof 
OoSden "Wax Beaits. This variety is 
an improvement on the Dwarf Golden Wax 
Bean; the seed is identical the same in color as 
that kind. The pods are straight, long, and 
fleshier than Golden Wax, superior in qualitj'' 
and positively ''Rust Proof," which is quite an 
object with us here in the South, when we 
often have rainy weather in the spring, which 
is injurious to most wax beans. The originator 




24. 



RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



also claims it to be more prolific and hardier 
than the ordinary Golden "Wax Bean. 

I have had this bean tried the past season 
and found it so superior to the ordinary Golden 
Wax, that I have concluded to drop this last 
named variety from my list. 

Detroit or Rust Proof TV^ax 
Sesins. This splendid wax bean is of recent 
introduction; it is jDroductive and hardy; pods 
straight, flat and somewhat broader than the 
Dwai-f Golden Wax. The beans, when well 
gTOwn. are of a beautiful golden yellow. The 
originator claims that when tried side by side 
with the majority of wax beans, it had never 
''spotted or rusted'' while most of the other 
varieties were unsalable. He claims it to be 
the best bean for shipping. 



P^ arf Butter Wax ISeau§i. This 
variety is also sold under the name of -'Bis- 
marck" and "jRustFroof Wax." It is very early, 
an excellent bearer, pods similar in shape to 
the Wardwell's Dwarf Kidney Wax ; they are 
very brittle and of a tine flavor. Xot as liable 
to rust as other kinds. The seed is of a dark 
purple color when dried. 

1»V a r <1 w e 1 1 ' s Dwarf Kicluey 
"Wax. This is the best dwar-f Wax Bean in 
cultivation: it is quite early; the pods are of 
similar shape as the Golden Wax, but longer; 
color of a beautiful golden vellow. Thev are 
very prolific and hardy, surpassing any other 
Dwarf Wax Bean that*^! know of. The color 
of the bean is somewhat like the Golden Wax. 
but more kidney-shaped and more s^DOtted with 
dark puiyle. It has done best here among the 
Dwarf Wax Beans. Of all the many new kinds 
I have tried. I found none to excel it. 

Dwarf Flag^eolet \f ax. A German 
variety which figures as Perfeciion Wax, also 
Scarlet Flageolet Wax in some catalogues. It is 
a robust growing sort with large fine yellow 
pods. For several years I have tried to intro- 
duce it amongst the gardeners who still give 
the WardtceU's Kidney the preference. 




Best of all Beans, % natural size. 




FOU THE SOUTHERN STATES 




Improved Valentine. 



Henderson's Dwarf Lima. 



26 



KICHAED FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



Haeicots A Eames 

Large Lima. 
Carolina or Sewee. 
Southern Willoio-leaved 
Dutch Case Knife. 
Southern Prolific. 



BEANS. 

POLE OE RrXXIXG, 

(Fr.), Staxgex-Bohxen (Ger.), Feijol Vastago (Sj). 

Crease Back. 

Lazy Wife's. 

German Wax or Batter. 

Golden Wax Fkujeolet. 

Early Golden Cluster Wax. 



Seicee or Butter 



Larg'e Lima. A ^ell-known and ex- 
cellent variety. It " is the best shell bean 
known. Shonld have rich ground, and plenty 
room to grow. 

Carolina or Sewee. A variety similar 
to the Lima; the only difference is, the seeds 
and pods are smaller. It is generally cnlti- 
vated, being more productive than the Large 
Lima. 

§oiitlieriB Willow-leaved Sewee 
or Butter. This is a variety which is grown 
by the market gardeners about Xew Orleans; 
the pods and Beans are the same as the Sewee 
or Carolina Bean; it is quite distinct in the 
leaves, being narrow like the willow. It stands 
the heat better than any other Butter Bean, 
and is very productive. Originated here, and 
was introduced by me. 

Dutch Case Knife. A very good pole 
bean: it is early; pods broad and long; some- 
what turned toward the end. 




Oei'Uiaai ^^ax. This is a tine variety, 
and has the same good qualities as the German 
Dwarf Wax. Pods have a waxy appearance; 
verv succulent and tender. 




Lazv Wife's Pole Beans. 



White Crease B;i< k Pole Beans. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



27 



Southern Prolific. No variety will 
contimie longer in bearing than this. It stands 
the heat of the summer better than any other, 
and is planted to succeed the other kinds. It 
is a very strong grower; pods about seven 
inches long and flat; seeds are dark yellow or 
rather light brown. It is the standard variety 
for the New Orleans Market, for late spring 
and summer. 

Crease Back. A variety of Pole Beans 
which has been cultivated in the South for a 
long time, but has never come into the trade 
till introduced b}^ me. It is an excellent bean, 
earlier than the "Southern Prolific." Seeds 
white; pods round, with a crease in the back, 
from which the name. It is a good grower, 
bears abundant!}', and, if shipped, will keep 
better than most other kinds. It sells better 
in the spring than any other for shipping- 
purpose; and when in season, it can not be 
surpassed. For early summer, the Southern 
Prolific is preferable, standing the heat better. 
Several years ago I received half a bushel from 



near Mobile, Ala., and all the beans of this 
variety in the whole countr}' can be traced 
back to that half bushel. I siipplied two 
growers in Georgia where it was not known 
that time. I expect to have a fiill supply this 
season. There is a light brown bean streaked 
and mottled with dark brown and black of the 
same name; but it is not et^ual to the white 
variety. In some localities this kind is called 
"Calico Crease Back." The white seeded 
variety is also known in some sections by the 
name of "Fat Horse." This is the original 
stock, the quality is so fine that no improve- 
ment can be made on it. 



This 



va- 



Ooldeii Wax Flag:eolet. 

riety was introduced a few years ago; it was 
brought out from G-ermany. After another 
year's experience I can confirm all what is 
claimed for it. It is the best Wax Pole Beam 
in cultivation, surpasses in length and delicacy 





Oolden Cluster Wax Pole Beans. 



Golden Wax Flageolet Pole Beans. 



28 



EICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



of flavor all other Wax varieties. It is a very 
strong gTOwer, which is "wanting by most of 
the "Wax Pole kinds. It bears abundantly, is 
entii'ely stringiess, and does not spot, even 
by too much rain or other untoward weather. 
Cannot be too highlv recommended. The 
Golden Wax Pole Bean, brought out a few 
years ago, I have dropped, as it can stand no 
comparison with the Golden Wax Flageolet. 

£arlyOolcleii Cluster \%^ax Pole. 

This is the earliest Wax Pole Bean in cultiva- 1 
tion; pods from 6 to 8 inches long, produced 

ENGLISH 



in clusters. The pods are golden yellow; for 
shipping they are rather too wide. It has not 
the same fine appearance of the Flageolet. 
For family use it cannot be too highly recom- 
mended on account of its productiveness and 
delicious flavor. 

Lazy Wife's. A Pole Bean from Penn- 
sylvania. The pods are entirely stringiess, 
4 — 5 inches long, and have a line flavor when 
cooked. They retain their rich flavor until 
nearly ripe. The beans are white, and as fine 
as a shell bean. 

BEANS. 



Feve de Maeais (Fr. I, Puff-Bohxex (Ger.), Haba Coimtn (Sp.\ 



feet apart, every 6 inches one bean, during 
November; as, if planted in the spring, they 
will not produce much. 



Hroad IrViiiclsor. Not so much cul- 
tivated here as in some parts of Europe. It is 
much liked by the people of the Southern part 
of Europe. Ought to be planted in drills 'Ih \ 

BEETS. 

Beteave (Fr.), Kuxkelkuebe (Ger.), Eemolacha (Sp.) 



Extra Early or Bassano. 
Simon's Early Bed Turnip. 
Early Blood Turnip. 
Edmond's Early Blood Turnip. 
Long Blood. 
Half Lonrj Blood. 



Egyptian Bed Turnip. 
Long Bed Mangel Wurzel. 
White French Sugar. 
Silver or Swiss Chard. 
Eclipse. 
Lentz. 



CULTUEE. 



The ground for beets should be rich and well spaded or plowed. Sow in dilUs twelve to 
eighteen inches aj^art, cover the seed about one inch deep. When about a month old, thin them 
out to four or six inches apart. In this latitude beets are sown from January till the end of 
April, and from the middle of July till the middle of November; in fact, some market gardeners 
sow them every month in the year. In the summer and fall it is well to soak the seeds over 
night and roll in jolaster before sowing. 



Extra £arly, or Bassano^ is the 

earliest variety, but not popular on account of 
its color, which is almost white when boiled. 
Earliness is not of such value here, where 
there are beets soAvn and brought to the market 
the whole year round. In the North it is 
different, where the first crop of beets in the 
market in spring will bring a better price than 
the varieties which mature later. 

!§iiiioii's Early Red Turnip. 

This is earlier than the Blood Turnip, smooth 
•skin'and of light red color; planted a good deal 
by the market gardeners about New Orleans. 



Early Blood Turnip. The most 
popular variety for market purposes as well as 
family use. It is of a dark red color and very 
tender. This is the principal variety planted 
for shipping. My stock is raised for me from 
dark selected smooth roots, and cannot be 
excelled. 

Ednioud's Early Blood Turnip 

Beet. A well selected variety ; regular in 
shape; deep blood skin, dark flesh of excel- 
lent quality. Small tap root and small top. 

Long* Blood. It is not quite so tender 
as the foregoing variety; it is not j)lantedat all 




Simon's Early Red Turnip Beet. 



Silver Beet or Swiss Chard. 



Early Blood Turnip Beet. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



29 



for the market, and very little for family lase. Half Long* Blood. A very dark red 

In the North it is chieily planted for winter | variety of a half long shape ; a good kind for 
nse; here we have Turnip Beets the whole family use. 

winter from the garden; therefore it has not Eg-yptiail Red Tiflriiip. This is a 

the same value. variety sent out by "Benary" some years 

ago. It is very early, tender, deep red and of 
Turnip shape. T^eaves of this variety are 
smaller than of others. The seeds are also 
much smaller. I recommend it and consider 
it a good acquisition. The seed of this variety 





Egyptian Reil Turnip Beet. 



White French Snga- Beet. 




Eclipse Beet. 



30 



RICHAKD FROTSCHER S ALMAN4-C AND GARDEN MANUAL 



is obtained by me from the original source and 
is the finest stock offered; increases in popu- 
larity every year. 

Eclipse. A new Beet fi'om Germany, 
^ery regular, of globular shape. It has a small 
top, is of dark red blood color, sweet and fine 
gTained flesh. It comes as early as the Egyp- 
tian. 

Loiig^ Red ]^Iaiig:el Wut zel. This 
is raised for stock; it grows to a large size. 
Here in the South where stock is not stabled 
during the winter, the raising of root crops is 
much neglected. Being very profitable for its 
food it ought to be more cultivated. 

IVIiite French Siig'ar, is used the 
same as the foregoing; not much planted. 

Silver Beet, or Swiss Cliard. 

'This variety is cultivated for its large succulent 

BORECOLE OR CURLED KALE. 

Chou-veet (Fr.) Gbukee Kohl (G-er.), Beeton (Sp.). 

DAvarf Oernian Oreens. A vegetable highly ^. 

esteemed in the Northern part of Europe, but very little _(f^' 

cultivated in this country. It requires frost to make it good 
for the table. Treated the same as cabbage. 

BROCCOLI. 

Chotj Beocoli (Fr.), Spaegel-Kohl (Ger.), Beoculi (Sp.). 
Purple Cape. Eesembles the Cauliflower, but not 
forming such compact heads, and not quite 



leaves, which are used for the same purposes as 
Spinach. It is very popular in the New Orleans 
market. 

Lentz. This strain of Blood Turnip Beet 
originated with one of the most prominent 
market gardeners around Philadelphia. This 
beet, as selected and grown by him, has had a 
great reputation in the surroundings of the 
above place, but the seed has been carefully 
guarded and kept until recently, when it fell 
into the hands of a seed grower, from whom I 
have received my supply. It is fully as early 
as the Egyptian Beet, but larger and of better 
quality; it has a fine turnip form with smooth 
roots, dark blood red flesh, tender and sweet 
at all times, never becoming tough and stringy, 
even when old. The cut is an exact represen- 
tation of its shape. 



fine 



so white, being 
Cauliflower here that 



of greenish cast. We raise such 
very little Broccoli is planted. 

The Purple Cape is the most desirable variety; cultivated 
ihe same as Half Early Cauliflower; further North than New 
■Orleans, where Cauliflower does not succeed, the Broccoli 
may be substituted, being hardier. 

BRUSSELS SPROUTS. 

Cnor DE Beuxelles (Fr. ), Eosen oe Speossen Kohl (Ger. ), 

Beeton de Beuselas (Sp.). 

A vegetable cultivated the same as the Cabbage, but very 
little known here. The small heads which appear along the 
Tipper part of the stalk between the leaves, make a fine dish 
when well prepared. Should be sown during August and 
■September. 




Brussels Sprout. 



Early York. 
Early Large York. 
Early Large Oxheari. 
Early Wiim ingstadt. 
Jersexj Wakefield. 
Early Flat Dutch. 
Early Drurahead. 
Large Flat Brunswick. 
Lnproved Early Summer. 



CABBACE. 

Chou Pomme (Fr.), Kopfkohl (^Ger.), Eepollo (Sp.). 

Lnproved Large Late Drumhead. 

Frotscher's Superior Late Flat Dutch. 

Crescent City Late Flat Dutch. 

Steins Early Flat Dutch. 

Bed Dutch (for pickling). 

Green Globe Savoy. 

Early Dwarf Savoy. 

Drumhead Savoy. 

St. Denis or Chou Bonneuil. 



During the past "World's Exposition" I exhibited different vegetables as they were in season. 
Many vi.sitors ^^ill recollect the tine specimens of Cabbage, Beets, Celery, Cauliflower, Lettuce, 
Cucumbers, etc., they saw there displayed. I received the Prize for ''IProtSClier's Fiat 
I> II tell Cal>ba§-e" and Early Blood Turnip Beets. Ten heads of Cabbage, devoid of all 
oiTtside leaA'es, weighed one hundred and seventy-three pounds. They were raised on Captain 
Marcy's place, one mile below Algiers. -^I did not exhibit them for competition, but merely to 
shoAV to our Northern visitors what fine vegetables we have here during the winter, when at their 
homes everything is covered with snow and ice. The Committee of Awards on Vegetables gave 
me the Prize without any solicitation on my part, — they thinking it well merited. (^See inside 
cover.) 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



31 



CULTURE. 

Cabbage requires a strong, good soil, and should be heavily manured. To raise large Cab- 
bage without good soil and withoiit working the plants well, is an impossibility. Cabbage is 
sown here almost every month of the year, but the seed for the main crop should be sown from 
July to September. Some sow earlier, but July is time enough. For a succession, seed can be 
sown till November. The main crop for Spring should be sown from end of October to end of 
November, as stated before. The raising of Cabbage for spring has become quite an item of late 
years; Brunswick should be sown a little earlier than the Early Summer, — the latter kind not till 
November, but in a frame, so the young plants can be protected against cold weather, which we 
generally have between December and January. After the middle of January setting out can be 
commenced with. These early varieties of Cabbage require special fertilizing to have them large. 
Early varieties are sown during winter and early spring. Cabbage is a very important crop, and 
one of the best paying for the market gardener. It requires more work and attention than 
most people are willing to give, to raise cabbage plants during the months of July and August. 
I have found, by careful observation, that plants raised in August are the surest to head here. 
The most successful gardeners in raising cabbage plants sow the seeds thinly in seed beds, and 
water several times during the day; in fact the seed-bed is never allowed to get dry from the 
sowing of the seed till large enough to transplant. There is no danger, in doing this, of scalding 
the j)lants, as many would suj)pose; but on the contrary, the plants thrive well, and so treated, 
will be less liable to be attacked by the cabbage flies, as they are too often disturbed during the 
da}'. Tobacco stems chopped up and scattered between the plants and in the walks between 
the beds, are a preventative against the fly. 




Earlv York. 



Large Flat Brunswick. 



Early Dwarf Savoy 





Early Winningstadt. 



St. Denis, or Chou Bonaeuil. 




''S^: 




Drumhead Savoy, 



1 arge York. 



32 



RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




These three heads of rabbage Avere grown by M. POFOVICH. at TrxiSBrRG. La. 

V 









Iraprovefl Large Drumhead. 



Earlv Larse Oxheart. 





Green Globe Savoy. 



Earlv Fhit Dutch. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



33 





Improved Early Summer. 



Crescent City Flat Dutch. 
Early York.. This is an early variety, 
but very little grown here except for family 
"use. As we have cabbage heading up almost 
the whole year, it has not the same value as 
in Northern climates, where the first cabbage 
in spring brings a good price. 

L^arg'e York.. About two or three weeks 
later than the above, forming hard heads; not 
grown for the market. Kecommended for 
family use. 

Early L.arg-e Oxlieart. An excellent 
variety, which is later than the Large York, 
and well adapted for sowing in fall or early 
spring. 

Early lYiiining^istadt. This is a 
very fine solid-heading varietj^; pointed and 
of good size, of the same season as the Ox- 
heart. It is -very good for family use. It does 
not suit the market, as no pointed cabbage 
can be sold to any advantage in the New Or- 
leans market. 

Jersey Wakefield. Very popular in 
the North; but little planted here. It is of 
medium size and heads up well. 

Early Flat Dutch. An intermediate 
kind between the early pointed and late varie- 
ties. It is not, on an average, as heavy as the 
Oxheart or Winningstadt; but, if raised for 
the market, more salable on account of being 
fiat. Very good variety for family use. 

Early Drumhead. A similar variety 
to the above; a little earlier, and not making 
as many leaves, it can be planted close. A 
good early spring cabbage. 

Earg:e Flat Brunswick. This is a 
late German variety, introduced by me over 
twenty-five years ago. It is an excellent kind, 
and when well headed up, the shape of it is a 
true type of a Premium Flat Dutch Cabbage. 
It requires very rich ground if sown for winter 
crop, and should be sown early, as it is a little 
more susceptible of frost than the Superior 
Flat Dutch. It is well adapted for shipping, 
being very hard, and does not wilt so quick as 
others. At Frenier, on the Ills. Cent. R. E. , 
this is the kind principally planted, and is pre- 
ferred over all other varieties. The people 




Early Drumhead. 

living there plant nothing else but cabbage, 
and have tried nearly all highly recommended 
varieties, and this is their choice. At that 
place the seeds are sown in October and 
November. The bulk of the cabbage raised 
there is shipped North in April and May, and 
is the finest which comes to the Chicago 
market. 

Improved Early Sumuier. This 
cabbage is of recent introduction. It is not 
quite so large as the Brunswick; for fall it can 
be sown in August; for spring, in November 
and as late as January. It heads up very 
uniform and does not produce many outside 
leaves. It is hardier than the Brunswick, and 
stands the cold and heat better. The seed I 
offer is the best strain cultivated, and can be 
planted closer together than the late varieties — 
say about 8000 to the acre. The finest crop of 
this variety (one hundred and fifty thousand 
heads of cabbage) I ever saw, was raised a few 
years ago near the city. The grower could 
commence on one end of the row to cut, and 
continue to the end, all well headed. They 
averaged about 7 pounds. 

Improved Earg:e Late Drum- 
head. Fine large variety; should be sown 
early in the fall for winter, or during Decem- 
ber and January for late spring use; it will 
stand more cold weather than the Brunswick. 

Superior Eate Fliit Dutch. This 

is the most popular variety for Avinter cab- 
bage, and cultivated by almost every gardener 
who plants for the NeM^ Orleans market. My 
stock is of siTperior quality, and I venture to 
say that seventy-five per cent, of all cabbage 



34 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



sold in the New Orleans market are of seeds 
which have been obtained from my store. 
During winter and spring, specimens which 
are brought as samj)les to my establishment, 
weighing from fifteen to twenty-five pounds, 
can frequently be seen. In regard to the time 
of planting, see remarks under head of "Cab- 
bage" in the directions for planting for July. 
I have tried seed of the Flat Dutch from dif- 
ferent growers, but have found none yet to 
equal the stock I have been selling for years, 
and which is raised for nie by contract. 

Crescent City Flat 1>ute!i. This 
variety I have been selling for the past few 
years under the name of No. 1. It is the most 
uniform heading cabbage suitable for this 
section; heads are large and solid. It is about 
two weeks earlier than my Superior Late Flat 
Dutch. Recommend same highly. 

Stein's Early Flat I>iitch Cato- 
l>ag°e. This is one of the earliest cabbages 
for its size. The demand for the seed has 
increased almost double since last year. It is 
a sure header, very regular and well adapted 
for shipping. It is planted exclusive of all 
other kinds, by some of the largest cabbage 
growers in this vicinity. 

RedL Dutell- Mostly used for pickling 
or salads. Very little cultivated. 



Oreen Olobe Savoy. Medium sized 
heads, not very hard, but all the leaves can 
be used. This and the following varieties are 
of fine flavor, and preferred by many over the 
other kinds. 

Early Dwarf Savoy. Head rather 
small but solid; leaves very curled and suc- 
culent; of a dark green color. Very fine for 
family garden. 

Drnnihead Savoy. Leaves are 
wrinkled, but not quite so much as the two 
foregoing kinds. It grows to a good size with 
large roundish heads. 

St. Desiis, or Chon Bonneuii. 

This w^as, at one time, one of the most popu- 
lar varieties grown for this market, but during 
the past few years has not done so well as 
formerly, and is, therefore, planted very little 
now. It does better for spring than for fall. 
Should be sown in November. 

Succession. This cabbage is of recent 
introduction; it resembles the German Bruns- 
wick; but not quite so large, it is of same 
season. It heads up very regularly and uni- 
form; should be planted same time as the 
Early Summer and Brunswick for a Spring- 
crop. 



CAULIFLOWER. 

Choufleuk (Fr.), Blumenkohl (Ger.), Coliflor (Sp.). 



Ext7Xi Early Paris. 

Half Early Paris, 

Early Erfuii. 

Le Norviands (short-stemmed). 



Early Italian Giant. 
Late Italian Giard. 
Large Algiers. 
Early Snowball. 



This is one of the finest vegetables grown, and succeeds well in the vicinity of New 
Orleans. Large quantities are raised on the sea coast in the neighborhood of Barataria Bay. 
The two Italian varieties are of excellent quality, growing to a large size, and are considered 
hardier than the German and French kinds. I have had specimens brought to my store, raised 
from seed obtained from me, weighing sixteen pounds. The ground for planting Cauliflower 




Earl3' Italian Giant Cauliflower. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



35 



should be very rich. They thrive best in rich, sandy soil, and require plenty of moisture dur- 
ing the formation of the head. The Italian varieties should be sown from Ai:»ril till Jvly; the 
latter month and June is the best time to sow the Early Giant. During August, Sejjtember 
and October, the Le Normands, Half Early Paris and Erfurt can be sown. The Half Early 
Paris is ver}' pojDular, but the other varieties are just as good. For spring crop the Italian 
kinds do not answer, but the early French and German varieties can be sown at the end of 
Deceml)er and during January, in a bed protected from frost, and may be transplanted into 
the open ground during February and as late as March. If we have a favorable season, and 
not too dry, they will be very fine; but if the heat sets in soon, the flowers will not attain the 
same size as those obtained from seeds sown in fall, and which head during December and 
January. 

Extra £arly Paris. The ear- 
liest variety; heads small, ver}^ tender. 

Half Early Paris. The most 
popular in the New Orleans market. 
Heads of good size, white and compact. 

Early Erfurt. This variety is of 
more dwarfish growth than the two for- 
mer. Heads white and of good size. 
Heads with certainty. 

Ee IVorinailcis is a French variety, 
and largely cultivated here. It stands 
more drj^ weather than the other varie- 
ties, and has large and pure white heads. 
Not so popular as the Half Early Paris 
in this market, but there is no good 
reason why it should not be, as it is an 
excellent kind in every respect; stands 
the heat better than any other. 

Earge Alg'iers. A French va- 
riety of the same season as the Le Nor- 
mands, but a surer producer. It is one 
of the best kinds, and has taken the 
place of other second early varietis since 
it has been introduced. 

Early Italian Oiant. Very 

large fine sort, not quite so late as the 
Late Italian, and almost as large. The 
heads are quite large, white and com- 
pact, and of delicious flavor. I recom- 
mend it to all who have not tried it. 
When sown at the proper season, it will 
head with certainty, and will not fail to 
give satisfaction. 

Eate Italian Oiant. This is 
the largest of all the Cauhflowers. It is 
grown to a considerable extent in the 
neighborhood of New Orleans. It is 
very large and compact; should not be 
sowu later than June, as it takes from 
seven to nine months before it heads. 

Early Snowball. An extra 

early dwarf variety similar to the Dwarf 
Erfurt; good to sow for last in siDring. 
It will produce flowers as early as the 
Extra Early Paris, but larger. Large Algiers. 

CARROT. 

Caeotte (Fr.), Moehee ok Gelbe Eube (Ger.), Zanahoeia (Sp.). 




Le Normands short-stemmed Cauliflower. 




Early Scarlet Horn. 
Half Long Scarlet French. 
Improved Long Orange. 
Long Bed without core 



St. Valerie. 
Half Long Luc. 
Danver's Intermediate. 
Chanteyiay Half Long Scarlet. 



Requires a sandy loam, well manured the previous year, and deeply spaded up. Should 
be sown m drills ten to twelve inches apart, so the plants can be worked after they are up. 
Gardeners here generally sow them broad-cast, and often the roots are small from beinc^ 
crowded too much together. 



36 



RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 






Early Scarlet Horn Carrot. 



Half Long Luc Carrot. 



Half Long- French 
Scarlet Carrot. 






Long Reel Carrot Avithout core. 



St. Valerie Carrot. Danver's Intermediate Carrot. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



37 



Early Scarlet Horn. A short, 
stiiiup-rooted variety of medium size, very 
early and of fine flavor. Not cultivated for 
the market. 

Half L.oiig^ Frcncli !§carlet. This 
is the most popular variety, and extensively 
grown for the market as well as for familj^ 
use. It is a little later than the Early Horn, 
but much larger; bright scarlet in color, and 
of fine flavor. 

Half Long" Liic. This is a variety 
from France. It is as early as any previously 
mentioned, but stump-rooted and larger. It 
is very smooth and of a fine color. 

Improved LoBig^ Oraiig'e. This is 
an old variety; roots long and of deep orange 
color, it is not much cultivated in this sec- 
tion, and the flavor is not so fine as that of 
the two preceding kinds. Valuable for field 
culture. 

Long' Red, without core. A variety 
from France, which is of cylindrical shape, 



very smooth, bright scarlet color, and of tine 
flavor; has no heart or core. It is not quite 
so early as the Half Long, but more produc- 
tive. Consider it a first-class variety for the 
table, and one that will come into general 
cultivation when better known. 

St. Valerie. This is also a French va- 
riety, bright red in color; a little larger and 
longer than the Half Long French, and 
stronger in the leaves. It is one of the 
finest carrots, and will in the course of time 
take the place of the Half Long. It is very 
smooth. 

I>anver'$. An intermeiliate American 
kind of recent introduction. It is of a bright 
orange color; very smooth; symmetrically 
formed; somewhat stump-rooted like the Half 
Long Luc. It will produce more in weight to 
the acre than any other Half Long variety. 

Cliantenay Half Long Carrot. 

A half long scarlet variety; similar to the Half 
Long Luc, but thicker. 



CELERY. 

Cblbbi (Fr.), Sblleeie (Ger.), Apio (Sp.). 

Large White Solid. Golden Self Blanching. 

Perfection Heartwell. Giant Pascal. 

Turnip-Rooted. « Cutting or Soup. 

Pwarf Large Bibbed. 

Sow in May and June for early transplanting, and in August and September for a later 
crop. Sow thinly and shade during the hot months. When the plants are six inches high, 
transplant into trenches about four inches deep, nine wide and two and a half feet apart, made 
very rich by digging in rotten manure. Plants should be from 6 to 8 inches apart. When 
planted out during the hot months, the trenches require to be shaded, which is generally done 
by spreading cotton cloth over them; latanniers will answer the same purpose. Celery 
requires plenty of moisture, and watering with soapsuds, or liquid manure, will benefit the 




Giant Pascal Celery. 



Dwarf, Large Ribbed Celerv. 



38 



RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



When tall enough, it should be earthed up to blanch to make it fit for 



plants a great deal. 
the table. 

Large Tl'^liite Solid. This variety 
used to be planted exclusively, but since the 
introduction of half dwarf and dwarf kinds, 
it has been dropped, more so by market gar- 
deners. It is crisp, but not as fine flayored 
as the following kinds. 

Perfection Heartwell. This variety 
is in size between the Large "SMiite Solid and 
Dwarf kinds; it is of excellent quality, very 
thick, and when blanched the heart is of a 
beautiful golden yellow color; preferable to 
the "White Solid, and one of the best kinds 
ever introduced. 

Dwarf Large Ribbed. This kind 
was brought here several years ago from 
France. It is short, but very thick ribbed, 
solid and of fine flavor. The best dwarf 
varietv for this section. 



Oolden Self Bl'^incliin; 



A French 



variety, of the best quality. The heart is solid, 
very tender, of a beautifid yellow color; the 
ribs brittle and of delicious flavor. Cannot 
be too highly recommended. 

Oiaiit Pa^ical. This is a selection from 
the New Golden Self-Blanching Celery; it 
partakes of the best qualities of that variety, 
but is much larger and a better keeper. It is 
of a fine nutty flavor; grows about two feet 
high; the stalks are very broad, thick and 
crisp, entirely stringiess; the width and thick- 
ness of the stalks are distinctive features of 
this kind. It bleaches with but slight ' 'earth- 
ing up" and very quickly, usually in five or 
six days. 

Celeriac or Tiiriiig>-Rooted Cel- 
ery, is very popular in some parts ( f Europe, 
but hardly cultivated here. It should be sown 
in the fall of the year, and transplanted six 




Celeriac or Turnip-Rooted Celery 




Perfection Henrtwell Celerv. 



Large Wh'.te Solid Celery, 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



39 



inches apart, WTien the roots have obtained 
a good size, they are boiled, scraped oft", sliced 
and dressed with vinegar, etc. , as a salad. 



Celery for 8 on p. This is sown in the 
spring of the year, broad-cast, to be used for 
seasoning, the same as Parsley. 



CHERVIL. 

Ceefeuix (Fr.), Keebelkkaut (Ger.). 

An aromatic plant, used a good deal for seasoning, especially in oyster soup, and is often 
cut between Lettuce when served as a salad. In the North this vegetable is very little known, 
but in this section there is hardly a garden where it is not found. Sow broad-cast during fall 
for winter and spring, and in January and February for summer use. 



COLLARI 

A kind of cabbage which does not head, but the leaves are used the same as other cabbage. 
Not so popular as in former years, and Yery little planted in this vicinit5^ 

CORN SALAD. 

Mache, Doucet (Fr.), Ackee Salat (Ger.), Valeeiana (Sp.), 

Broad-leaved Corn Salad is the variety generallj^ cultivated. It is used as a salad during 
the winter and early spring months. Should be sown broad-cast or in drills nine inches apart 
during fall and winter. 

CORN. 

INDIAN. 



Mais (Fr.), 

Extra Early Dwarf Sugar. 
Adam's Extra Early. 
Early Sugar or Sweet. 
StoweVs Evergreen Sugar. 
Golden Dent Gourd Seed. 
Early Yellow Canada. 
Large White Flint. 



Welschkoen (Ger.), Maiz (Sp.). 

Blunfs Prolific Field. 
Improved Learning. 
Golden Beauty. 
Champion White Pearl, 
Moshy's Prolific. 
Hickory King. 



Plant in hills about three feet apart, drop four to five seeds and thin out to two or three. 
Where the ground is strong the Adam's Extra Early and Crosby's Sugar can be planted in hills 
two and a half feet apart, as these two varieties are more dwarfish than the other kinds. Plant 
for a succession from February to June. 

Extra Early, or Crosby's Divarf 
Sug'ar. This is a very early variety and of 
excellent quahty. Ears small, but very tender. 
It is not so extensively planted as it deserves 
to be. 

Adam's Extra Early, the most 
popular variety wdth market gardeners for first 





Champion White Pearl Coru. 



Evergreen Eiirly Sugar, or Extra Early 

Sugar Corn. New England Corn. Sngar Corn. 



40 



RICHARD FROTSCHER's ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



planting. It has no tine table qualities, but as 
it grows to a good size, and is matured in about 
forty days from time of planting, it meets \\dth 
ready sale in the market, and for these reasons 
gardeners prefer it. 

Early l§ug^ar, or New Eaig^laiid. 

A long eight-rowed variety, which succeeds 
the Early sorts. Desirable kind. 

Stowel's Evergreen ISiig;ar. This 
is the best of all Sugar Corn. It is an early 
Corn, but the ears are of large size, and are 
well tilled. It remains green longer than any 
other variety, and is quite productive. The 
cultivation of this excellent cereal, as well as 
all other Sugar Corn, is much neglected, yet 
why people will plant common field-corn for 
table use, considering size instead of quality, 
I can not understand. 

Oolden Dent OourdI Seed. A field 
variety which is very productive at the North. 
It makes a very fine Corn South, but has to be 
planted here several years in succession before 
it attains perfection, as during the first year 
the ears are not well covered by the husk, 
which is the case with all Northern varieties. 
When selected and planted here for a few 



years, it becomes acclimated and makes an 
excellent Corn, with large, fine ears, grain 
deep and cob of medium size. 

EarBy Yellow Canada. A long 
eight-rowed variety. It is very early, and is 
planted in both the field and garden. It does 
well here. 

Earg^e White Flint. A very popular 
variety with gardeners and amateurs. It is 
planted here for table use principally, but like 
the Golden Dent, makes an excellent kind for 
field culture after it has been planted here for 
two or three years. 

Blunt's Prolific Field Corn. This 

is a very excellent variety, either for the field 
or for the table. It is very prolific, producing 
from four to six ears of corn. They are of 
medium size, but well filled and heavy. It is 
second early. This variety has done better 
than any other, and being of Southern origin, 
it seems to be better adapted to our climate. 
I recommend it as an early yielding Corn for 
field culture. 

Improved Eeaniingr. An extra early 
field variety. It is not hard and flinty, but sweet 
and nutritious, making excellent feed and fine 




Improved Learning. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



41. 



meal. The ears are large and handsome, with well on heavy or light soil ; it has shown itself 

deep large grains, deep orange color and small ! as very reliable. 

red cob. It is very productive. The shucks \ Ooldeii Beauty. This is the hand- 
cover the ear better than any Northern or somest of all yellow corn; the ears are of a 



Western variety I have ever tried. It is 
adapted to a variety of soils, and produces 



perfect shape, long, and filled out to the 
end of the cob. The grains are not of a flinty 




^<;s^H^<;:iV^^,\?)^ 



Golden Beauty Corn. 



Hickory King Corn. 



42 



RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



type, neither are they so soft as to be greatly 
shrivelled, as in the Golden Dent. Golden 
Beanty matures early, ripening in eighty days 
from planting, and surpasses all in size and 
beauty of grain. 

CliaBiipion \¥liUe Pearl. This is 
a very handsome white corn. The grain is 
pure white, exceedingly heavy and long, two 
of which will span the c6b, which is small. 
Being medium in size of stalk it can be planted 
much thicker than a large Corn, and at the 
same time bear a full sized ear. The originator 
has established in Champion White Pearl Corn 
a short, thick stalk, with the ear growing low 
upon it, which is an advantage in stormy 
weather. Planted here a good deal for the 
market. 

Mosby's Prolific Corn. This is a 
Southern Corn, and is recommended for 
general crop. The originator of this, variety 



says: "This corn is a cross between two 
widely different varieties. It is purely white; 
small cob, deep, full grain, neither too hard 
nor too soft. It wilf stand crowding in the 
drill as close again as any other kind. Ears 
of medium size, but long. It stands the 
drought better than ordinary corn. " Should 
be planted eaily. 



HicRory King*. This Field Corn is of 
recent introduction. It has proven itself all 
that was claimed for it. It is the Largest 
Grained and Smallest Cobbed Pure White 
Dent Corn in the World. It is very earlj^ 
The ears are from seven to nine inches in 
length, and are generally borne from three to 
five to a stalk, making it very productive. 
The ears are well covered by the shucks; a 
great consideration in Field Corn planted in 
the South, 



CRESS. 

Ceesson (Fr.), Keesse (Ger.), Bekko (Sp.). 

Used for salad during winter and spring. Sow broad-cast or in drills six inches apart. 
Curled or Pepper Orass. Not much used in this section. 

BroMd-Leaved. This variety is extensively cultivated for the market. It is sown 
from early fall to late spring. The leaves resemble Water Cress, a variety which does not well 
succeed here. Is considered a very wholesome dish. 



CUCUMBER. 

CoNcoMBKE (Fr.), GuEKE (Ger.), Pepino (Sp.). 

Improved Early White Spine. 
Early Frame. 
Long Green Turkey. 



Early Cluster. 

New Orleans Market. 

Gherkin, or Burr (for pickling J . 



Cucumbers need a rich soil. Plant in hills from three to four feet apart; the hills should 
be made rich with well decomposed manure, and eight to ten seeds should be planted in each 
hill, and covered about one-half inch deep; when well up, thin out to four plants in the hill till 
the vines meet. When the spring is dry the plants have to be watered, else they do not keep in 
bearing long. They can be planted from March till July. A great many cucumbers are planted 
here in Februarj^ or even sooner, and are protected by small boxes with a pane of glass on top. 
These boxes are removed during the day, and put back in the evening. When days are cloudy 
and cold, the plants are kept covered. 




West India Gherkiii. 



Fai'ly Frame. 



Early Cluster. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



4a 



Iiiiproved Early White Spine. 

This is a popular variety. It is of medium 
size, light green, covered with white spines, 
and turns white when ripe. A good kind for 
shipping. It is used by market gardeners for 
forcing as well as outdoor culture. It is very 
productive. 

TVew Orleaii<ii Market. This is a va- 
riety selected from an imported forcing 
cucumber introduced by me. It is good for 
forcing or open ground; very productive, keeps 
its green color, and has few vines. This kind 
cannot be excelled for shipi^ing, as it produces 
very perfect cucumbers and but few culls; the 
largest growers of cucumbers for shipping 
about here plant none but this variety. It is 
quite different from the Long White Spine 
offered by some. 

Early Frame. Another early variety, 
but not so popular as the foregoing kind. It 
is deep green in color, but turns yellow very 




quickly; therefore gardeners do not plant it 
much. 

Ijong* Oreeii Turkey. A long variety 
attaining a length of from fifteen to eighteen 
inches when well grown. Very fine and pro- 
ductive. 

Early Cluster. Early, short and 
prickly; it bears in clusters. 

l¥est India €r her kin. This is an 
oval variety, small in size. It is used for pick- 
ling when young and tender. When grown ta 
its full size it can be stewed with meat. In 
fact, this is the only use made of it about New 
Orleans. 




Improved Early White Spine. 



New Orleans Market. 



ECC-PLANT. 



Aubergine (Fr.j, Eiekpflanze (Ger.), Beeengena (Sp.). 

The seed should be sown in hot-beds in the early part of January. When a couple of inches 
high they should be transplanted into another frame, so that the plants may become strong and 
robust. When warm enoiTgh, generally during March, the plants can be planted in the open 
ground, about two and a half feet apart. This vegetable is very profitable in the South, and 
extensively cultivated. 



Earg^e Purple, or ]¥ew Orleans 
Market. This is the only kind grown here; 
it is large, oval in shape and of a dark purple 
color and very productive. Southern grown 
seed of this, as a good many other tropical 
or sub-tropical vegetables, is preferable to 
Northern seed, as it will germinate more 
readily, and the plant will last longer during the 
hot season. It is the best variety for shipping. 



superior to the Northern raised kinds. It car- 
ries better. The cut is made from three com- 
mon specimens and represents the true form. 

Early Dwarf Oval. This variety is 
very earl 3' and productive; the fruit is not so 
large as the New Orleans Egg-Plant, but equal 
m flavor. For market it will not sell as well 
as the former; desirable for famil}' garden. 



44 



RICHARD rROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



The New York. l^Iarket. Is rounder 

in shape than the New Orleans; it has spines 
■on leaves and stems; not very popular here. 



Shippers and gardeners always give the New 
Orleans Market variety the preference. 





Earlv Dwarf Oval. 



New York Market. 




'•!,«:=::: 



New Orleans Market. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



45 



ENDIVE. 

Chicoree (Fr.), Endivibn (Ger.j, Endibia (Sp.). 

A salad plant which is very popular and much cultivated for the market, principally for 
summer use. It can be sown in drills a foot apart, and when the plants are well up, thinned 
out till about eight inches apart. Or it can be sown broad-cast thinly and transplanted the 

same as Lettuce, When the leaves are large 

enough, say about eight inches long, tie 

j>(. ^ them up for blanching, to make them lit 

W^M ^'*^ ^^® table. This can only be done in dry 




Green Curled Endive. 




Early White Vienna Kohl-Rabi. 




Lar^e London Flag Leek. 



^.r£^ weather, otherwise the leaves are apt to rot. 
For summer use do not sow before the end 
of March, as if sown sooner, the plants will 
run into seed very early. Sow for a succes- 
sion during the spring and summer months. 
For winter use sow in September and 
October. 

Oreeil Curled. Is the most desir- 
able kind, as it stands more heat than the 
following sort, and is the favorite market 
variety. 

Extra Fine Curled. Does not grow 
quite so large as the foregoing, and is more 
apt to decay when there is a wet summer. 
Better adapted for winter. 

Broad-Leaved, or Escarolie. 

Makes a fine salad when well grown and 
blanched, especially for summer. 

GARLIC. 

Oarlic. There is more Garlic grown in 
Louisiana than in any other State, or all 
States together. It is a staple product of 
the lower Parishes. It is raised for home 
consumption and shipping. It is used for 
flavoring stews, roasts and various other 
dishes. People from the South of Europe 
use much more than the inhabitants of the 
United States. It should be planted in Oc- 
tober and November, in drills two to three 
feet apart, about six inches in the drills and 
one inch deep. The distance between the 
rows depends upon the mode of cultivation; 
if planted in the garden, a foot between the 
rows is sufficient. It is ciiltivated like Oni- 
ons; in the spring they are taken up and 
plaided together in a string by the tops. 
One of these strings contains about from 50 
to 70 heads in double rows; they are then 
stored or rather hung up in a dry, airy 
place. They keep from 6 to 8 months. 

KOHL-RABI, or TURNIP- 
ROOTED CABBAGE. 

Chou Navet (Fr.), Kohl-Rabi (Ger. i Col. 
DE Nabo (Sp. ). 

This vegetable is very popular with the 
European population of this city, and largely 
cultivated here. It is used for soups, or 
prepared in the same manner as Cauliflower. 
For late fall and winter use it should be sown 
from the end of July till the middle of Oc- 
tober; for spring use, during January and 
February. When the young plants are one 
month old transplant them in rows one foot 
apart, and about the same distance in the 
rows. They also grow finely if sown broad- 



46 



KICHAED FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



•cast and tliinned ont -vrheii voung, so that the plants are not too crowded; or, thev may be 



so\m in drill?- 



and cnltiTated the same as Euta Bagas. 



Early White Vienna. The finest 
TarietT of aU. and the only kind I kee^D. It is 
earlv. forms a smooth biilb. and has fe^v small 



leaves. The so-called large White or Green is 
not desirable. 



LEEK. 

PoiEEAU iFr.), LArcH (Ger.j, Pueeo (Sp.). 

A species of Onion, highly esteemed for flavoring soups. Should be sown broad-cast and 
transplanted, when aboiit six to eight inches high, into rows a foot apart, and sis inches apart 
in the rows. Should be planted at least four inches deep. They require to be well cultivated 
in order to secure large roots. Sow in October for winter and spring use, and in January and 
Pebruarv for summer. 



L<ar$;e JLondon Flag*. I* the kind vaiiety which grows to a verv large size; takes 
most geneially grown. 

Eai'se Carentan. This is a French 



the place of the former. 



LETTUCE. 

Laitue (Tr.), Lattich iGer.j, Lechuga (Sp.). 



Early Cahlxige, or White Butter Head. 
Tnqrroved Boyal Cahhage. 
JBroicn Dutch Cabbage. 
Drumhead Cabbage. 



WJiite Far is Loss. 

Perpignan. 

Xeic Orleans Improved Large Passion. 

Trocadero. 



Lettuce is sown here during the whole year by the market gardener. Of course it takes a 
^reat deal of labor to produce this vegetable during our hot summer months. For directions 
how to sprout the seed during that time, see "Work for June." The richer and better the 
ground the larger the head will be. Xo finer Lettuce is grown anywhere else than in New 
Orleans during fall and sirring. The seed should be sown broad-cast, when large enough. 
23lanted out in rows a foot apart, and fi'om eight to ten inches apart in rows. Some kinds gi'ow 
larger than others; for instance, Butterhead will not require- as much space as Drumhead or 
Pei-pignan. 





Perpignan Lettuce. 



Drumhead Cabbage Lettuce. 




Improved Royal Cabbage Lettuce. 





Early Cabbage or White Butter Lettuce. 



White Paris Coss Lettuce. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



47 







Tioeadero Lettuce. 







Harly Cabbag'e or YTIiite 

JS utter. Au early variety, form- 
ing a solid head, but not quite so 
large as some others. It is the 
best kind for family use, to sow 
during fall and early spring, as 
it is very early and of good flavor. 

Improved Royal Ctib- 
bag'e. This is the most jDopular 
variety in this State. Heads light 
green, of large size, and about two 
weeks later than the White But- 
ter. It is very tender and crisp ; 
can be sown later in the spring 
than the foregoing kind and does 
not run into seed so quickly. 
Browai Diitcli Cabbag:e. 
A very hard kind, forms a solid 
head; not so popular as many 
other kinds; good for winter. 

Drumhead Cabbau'e. An excellent 
spring variety, forming large heads, the outer 
leaves curled. 

_Waiite Paris Coss. This is very popu- 
lar with the New Orleans market gardeners, as 
it is the favorite with the French population. 
It grows to perfection and forms large, line 
heads, particularly in the spring of the year. 

Perjpigiian. A fine German variety 
which forms large, light green heads, and 
which stands the heat better than the lioyal. 
It is much cultivated for the market, as it 
thrives well when sown during the latter part 
of spring. 

New Orleans Improved LtVtrse 
Passion. This is a large Cabbage Lettuce 
introduced by me from California; it attains 
a large size, grows slowly, but heads ver}" hard. 
It does better here during late autumn and 
winter than in summer, as it cannot stand the 
heat. If sown late in the fall and transplanted 
during winter, it grows to very large heads, 
hard and lirm. It is the kind shipped from 
here in the spring, and cannot be surpassed 
for that purpose. 

Trocadero L<ettuce. This is a new 
Cabbage Lettuce from France; it is of light 
green color, forming a large solid head, re- 
sembling the New Orleans Improved Passion 
Lettuce somewhat in appearance; however, 
the leaves are thinner, and, therefore, not so 
well adapted for shipping; it is excellent for 
forcing. 

MELON. 

MUSK OR CANTELOUPE. 

Osage. Pine Apple. 

Netted Nutmeg. Early White Japan. 

Netted Citron. Persian or Cassaba. 

New Orleans Market. 



Osage Melon. 



Melons require a rich sandy loam. If the 
ground is not rich enough, a couple of shovels 
full of rotted manure should be mixed into each hill, which ought to be from five to six feet 
apart; drop ten or twelve seeds, and when the plants have two or three rough leaves, thin out 
to three or four plants. Canteloupes are cultivated very extensively in the neighborhood of 
New Orleans; the quality is very fine and far superior to those raised in the North. Some 
gardeners plant during February and cover with boxes, the same as described for Cucumbers. 
When Melons are ripening, too much rain will impair the flavor of the fruit. 



48 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




? <:.K.o.l. 



Note. — The above cut represents the New Orleans Melon; it has been taken from a common speci- 
men grown by one of my customers, who raises the seed of this variety for me. 

O s a g-e Musk Melon, This variety is 



cultivated largely for tlie Chicago market. It 
is small and does not look very attractive, but 
is of excellent flavor. Eecommend it highly 
for family use. It will not sell well in this 
market. People here are accustomed to 
roughly netted melons, such as the New Or- 
leans Market. The Osage is smooth, very 
slightly netted. 

l^etted IViitiiieg: MeSoii. Small oval 
melon, roughly netted, early, and of line 
flavor. 

JVetfecl Citron Caiitelonpe. This 
A'ariety is larger than the foregoing kind; it is 
more rounded in sha^je. of medium size and 
roughly netted. 

Ir*iin* Apple Casiteloiipe. A medium 
sized early variety, oval in shape, and of verj' 
fine flavor. 

Early Tl'liite Japan Cante- 
loupe. An early kind, of creamish white 
color, very sweet, and of medium size. 

Persian or Cassaba. A large variety, 
of oval shape and delicate flavor. The rind of 
this kind is very thin, which is a disadvantage 
in handhng, and prevents it from being planted 
for the market. Very fine for family use. 

m^XKf Orleans Market. A large 
species of the citron kind. It is extensively 



grown for this market; large in size, very 
roughly netted and of luscious flavor ; difierent 
altogether from the Northern Netted Citron, 
which is earlier but not so fine in flavor, ancl 
not half the size of the variety grown here. 
The New Orleans Market cannot be excelled 
by any other variety in the world. In a 
favorable season it is a perfect gem. I have 
tried it alongside of varieties praised at the 
North, such as are brought out everv vear. — 
but none of them could compare with the 
New Orleans Market. As for some years past 
the seeds were scarce I had some gi'own North, 
but they lost their fine cpialities, size ancl 
flavor. It rec^uires a Southern sun to bring 
the seed to perfection. Small varieties of 
melons ^vill improve in size if cultivated here 
for a number of years, and if care is taken 
that no Cucumbers. Squashes, Gourds or 
Pumpkin are cultivated in the vicinity. If 
the best and earlie.st .specimens are selected 
for seed, in three or four years the fi'uit will 
be large and fine. 

IVewEarly Hackensack. A newly 
introduced variety resembling the well known 
Hackensack, but not quite so large. It is 
productive and of good flavor. The seed I 
offer are Southern grown. It is earlier than 
the New Orleans Market. Eecommend same 
highly. 



MELON. 

WATEK. 
Melok d'Eau (Er.), Wasseemeloxe (Ger.), Saxdia (Sp.). 
Ice Cream (White Seeded). Rattle Snake. Eolb Gem. '■ Florida s Favorite. 

Mammoth Iron Clad. Pride of Georgia. Seminole. Lone Star. 

Water Melon will grow and produce in places where Canteloupe will not do well. The soil 
for this plant must be light and sandy. Plant in hills about eight feet apart, eight to twelve 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES, 



49 



seeds in a hill; when the plants are well up thin out to three. The plants should be hoed 
often, and the ground between the hills kept clean till the vines touch. 



Ice CrecHn. (White Seeded.) A me- 
dium sized variety of excellent quality. It is 
early and very productive. Being thin in the 
rind it is not so well adapted for the market 
as the other kinds; notwithstanding this it is 
grown exclusively by some for that, on account 
of its earliness. It has come into general cul- 
tivation more and more every year, as it is 
very sweet, and sells readily in the market. 

Rattle Snalce. An old Southern va- 
riety which has come into notice of late years. 
It is of large size, light green, with large dark 
stripes, and is identical with the Gypsy. Fine 
market variety. It stands transportation bet- 
ter than most other kinds; has been the 
standard market melon till the Kolb's Gem 
was introduced. However it always will 



remain a favorite with market gardeners. The 
seed I offer of this variety is grown for me by 
one of the best growers in Georgia. It is of 
the purest strain that can be found. 

main mo til Iron Clad. Highly re- 
commended North. It did not do as well as 
Southern raised seed. I have the seed now 
grown in Florida, and, no doubt, it will give 
better satisfaction. 

Pride of Georgia. A variety from 
Georgia, of excellent quality; attains a large 
size when well cultivated. Very good for 
family use. 

K.oll> Oein. Only a few years since this 
variety has been introduced, but the shipping- 
qualities are so good, that the bulk of melons 
raised for the market are of that kind. Flesh 




-^V , 



Mammoth Iron Clad. 




Florida's Favorits 



50 



RICHARD FKOTSCHER'S ALMINAO AXD GARDEN MANUAL 



crimson, very thin but tough rind; fine flavor 
and full of flesh, no hollow in the raiddle. It 
is the heaviest melon for its size. What I 
offer are Southern grown seeds. 

Florida's Favorite, This melon 
originated with W. M, Girardeau, of Monti- 
cello, Fla. It is an excellent variety, prolific, 



earlier than the Kolb Gem, Kattle Snake or 
Pride of Georgia, and very fine for the table. 
It is not as good for shipping as the Kolb 
Gem, or Kattle Snake; it is of medium size, 
colored \sith light and dark green stripes 
alternately, flesh deep red, deliciously sweet, 
firm and crisp. One of the best melons. 




Pride of Georgia. 




/ 



FOB THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



51 



ii~c.'^---,!-.'.*?:.':(-s'<-.-Vv'"-'>-'"'." -'" ■•■ '■■'^- 








Lone Star. 



Seminole. A novelty of recent intro- 
duction. A very early Melon, oblong in shape, 
of two colors, some grey and others light 
green, resembling the Ice Cream, but larger 
in size. It is fine flavored and productive. 

Uoiie Star lil^ater Melon. This 
Melon was brought here from Texas by Mr. 
Nat. Henderson, of Iberia Parish, La. In 
visiting that section some years ago, I was very 



favorably impressed with the uniform size of 
the abundant crop of melons. I secured a 
small quantity of the seed; but by an unfort- 
unate accident I lost nearly all of them, ex- 
cepting a few seeds which I had given for trial 
to some of my customers who make Melon- 
growing a specialty. It has proven to be the 
best Melon for this section, either for Market 
or familv use. This Melon is above medium 



52 



RICHARD FROTSCHER's ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



and very uniform in size; a prolific bearer, 
oblong in shape; the rind is of mottled green 
and black color, somewhat like the Rattle- 
snake, but of a darker green. The fiesh is of 
a deep red color, solid, crisp and very sweet; 



in flavor it cannot be excelled by any variety. 
It is excellent for market as well as for family 
"use. When better known it will become one 
of the leading varieties for the South. Ee- 
commend san:e very highly. 



MUSTARD. 

MouTAEDE (Fr.), Seistf (Ger.), Mostaza (Sp.). 

White or Yelloio Seeded. \ Large Leaved Curled. \ Chinese very large Cabbage Leaved. 

This is grown to quite an extent in the Southern States, and is sown broad-cast during fall, 
winter and spring. It may be used the same as Spinach, or boiled with meat as greens. The 
White or Yellow Seeded is very little cultivated, and is used chiefly for medical purjDoses, or 
pickling. The large-leaved or Curled has black seed, a distinct kind from the Northern or 
European variety. The seed is raised in Louisiana. It makes very large leaves; cultivated 
more and more every year. 



light green very large leaves. It has not the 
same taste as the large-leaved or the large 
curled, but will stand longer before going to 
seed. 



L-ai's^e- Leaved Curled. This is the 
favorite kind here, sown largely for the market. 
Leaves are pale green, large and curled or 
scalloped on the edges. 

Chinese Very L<arg:e Cabbag^e- 
Leaved. This is a European variety, with 

NASTURTIUM. 

Capucine (Fr.), Indianische Keesse (Ger.), Capuchina (Sp.). 
Tall. I Dwarf. 

Planted here only for ornament. (For description see List of Climbing Plants.) 

OKRA. 

Green Tall-Growing. | Dwarf Green. \ Wliite Velvet. 

This is a highly esteemed vegetable in the South, and no garden, whether small or large, is 
without it. It is used in making "Gumbo," a dish the Creoles of Louisiana know better how 
to prepare than any other nationality. It is also boiled in salt and water, and served with 
vinegar as a salad, and is considered a wholesome dish. Should not be planted before the 
ground is warm in spring, as the seeds are apt to rot. Sow^ in drills, which ought to be two^to 
three feet apart, and when up, thin out, and leave one or two plants every twelve or fifteen 
inches. 

Tall Cr rowing'. This is the variety 
most cultivated here. The pods are long, 
round towards the end, and keep tender longer 
than the square podded kind. 

Dwarf Oreen Prolific. This is an 
extra early variety, very prolific; the pods are 
close together, from which the name. If 
planted for market it will be only in demand 
up to the time the long podded varieties come 
in; as in this market no ribbed pods sell well. 




White Velvet Okra. 




Tall Growing Okr 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



53 



While Velvet.. A white variety; dwarf 
with round, smooth pods, free from ridges and 
seams, and not prickly to the touch; very 
prolific and early. I tried this variety thor- 



oughly. It has come up to what is claimed 
for it. I recommend it to all who have not 
tried it. 



ONION. 

Ognon, (Fr.), ZwiEBEL, (G-er.), Cebolla, (Sp.). 



Louisiana or Creole. 
Bed Bermuda. 



White Bermuda. 
White Queen. 



The following cut represents a well-grown Onion raised from Louisiana or Creole 
seed. The Onion is one of the most important vegetables planted in this section. Thousands 
of barrels are annually shipped from here to the West and North. If sown at the proper 
time, with ordinary cultivation, they will always produce a crop and meet with ready sale. 
The seed is not a sure crop every year and some years it sells very high; the past season I had a 
fair crop of good heavy seed. Up to two years ago I could never find any variety of onion which 




54 



RICHAED FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AXD GARDEN MANUAL 




would form good bulbs like the Creole; I have tried all the Italian kinds before without success, 
but having no Louisiana seed at all, I imported the True Red Beriiiiida seed, which is 
raised at Teneriffe and the coast of Africa. It is a liat shaped onion, a little lighter in color 
than the Creole, earlier, and does not shoot up like that kind; comes in the market just after 
the shipping from the West is exhausted; hits the market at the proper time; would recommend 
the Bermuda for home use and home market, but for shipping to distant markets it is unfit, as 
it decays quickly, and when dry peels off. The Creole has the preference, even shot up Onions 
seU for a better price than the Bermuda. None of the Xorthern groicn seeds soicn here will produce 
any onion. 

\Fliite Bermuda Onion. 

This variety is of the same shape, 
size and flavor as the RedBermuda ; 
the only difference is the color, 
which is pure white. Very good 
for family use. 

The Liouisiana or Cre- 
ole Onion has been cultivated 
here for a century, — supposed to 
have been brought here, first, from 
the south of Europe; I presume 
the bulbs produced but few seeds. 
It is hard to say from what va- 
riety this Onion originated; having 
been planted here for so long, it 
has become a distinct kind. It is 
not as red as the Wethersfield, and 
not as hght as the Strassburg; in 
flavor it is similar to the two last 
named varieties, but much strong- 
er than the Italian kinds. In this 

latitude the seed should be sown from the 15th 
of September to about the 10th of October; if 
sown sooner a good many will throw up seed 
stalks, which impairs the keeping quality of 
the onion. We sow the seed broad-cast, pro- 
tect the seed beds by spreading green moss 
over them, which is removed every evening 
and replaced in the morning. Some gardeners 
use Latanniers for covering the beds. When 
the seed is coming up, say in 7 or 9 days, the 
cover has to be removed entirely; but if the 
weather is dry, the Avatering has to be con- 
tinued. They thrive best in loamy soil. Can 
be planted in same ground for years; they 
require no rotation as other crops. 

^Mien the plants have reached the size of a 
goose quill, they are transplanted into rows, 
which can be from one to two feet apart, ac- 
cording to the mode of cultivation, and about 
five to sis inches apart in the rows. The 
gi'ound should be thoroughly prepared "i^efore 
setting out the plants. We generally shorten 
the tops and roots. In April the onion will 
be ready to be taken up. 

In sections where it is too cold to sow Onion 
seed in the fall, the Creole seed can be sown 
in January and February; in that case they 
should be sown very thinly in drills, thinned 
out to proper stand, and by the end of spring 
they will produce a good sized Onion. Grow- 
ers here use very little, if any, fertilizers, but 
it can be used with advantage. One of my 
customers used 500 pounds of phosphated 



bone on sor^e of his crop, and the result was 
very satisfactory. He sold from three acres, 
250 barrels of onions, flour barrels, well packed 
for shipping, not produce barrels as sent here 
from the West. He also had a lot of small 
ones left for home use. For spring sowing I 
recommend the Bermuda seed. 

The seed of the Creole Onion, which I oft'er, 
is raised for me by an old experienced onion 
grower at Lafourche; he has raised seed for 
me for over twenty years. Xo better stock 
can be found. I do not depend upon chance 
purchases; very often seeds raised from shot 
up onions are sold very low, but will not pro- 
duce good merchantable onions, having a ten- 
dency to go to- seed again before the bulb is 
matured. Most gardeners here know all about 
the cultivation of Creole Onion; these re- 
marks, therefore, are made for those who live 
in adjoining States where the Creole Onion 
can be successfully cultivated — more so in 
Texas, ]VIississippi and Florida. The demand 
for Creole Onion seed from these sections in- 
creases every year, especially from Texas. 

ITALLIX OXIONS. 

White Qneen. This is a medium sized, 
white variety from Italy, very early and flat ; 
can be sown as late as February, and good 
sized bulbs will yet be obtained. It is of mild 
flavor and very fine when boiled and dressed 
for the table. ^ It cannot be too highly recom- 
mended. 



SHALLOTS. 

ECHALLOTTE iFr.j, SCHALLOTTEN (Gcr.). 

A small sized Onion which grows in clumps. It is generally grown in the South, and used 
in its green state for soups, stew, etc. There are two varieties, the Eed and ^Mute; the latter 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



55 



variety is the most popialar. In the fall of the year the bulbs are divided and set out in rows a 
foot apart, and four to six inches in the roM's. They grow and multii^ly very fast, and can be 
divided during winter, and set out again. Late in Spring, when the tops become dry, they have 
to be taken up, thoroughly dried, and stored in a dry airy place. 



PARSLEY. 

Persll (Fr.), Peteesilie (Ger.), Pee.til, (Sp.). 



Plain Leaved. 
Double (Juried. 



Improved Garnishing. 



Parsley can be sown during the fall from August to October, and during spring, from the 
end of January to the end of April. It is generallj^ sown broad-cast. 



Plain JLeavecl. This is the kind raised 
for the New Orleans Market. 

Double Curled. The leaves of this 
variety are curled. It has the same flavor as 
the other kind, but is not so popular. 



Improved Oarnisliiiig:. This is the 
best kind to ornament a dish; it has the same 
flavor as the other kinds. 



PARSNIP. 

Panais (Fr.), Pastinake (Ger.), Pastinaca (Sp,). 

Hollow Crown, or Sugar. 

Should be sown in deep, mellow soil, deeplj^ spaded, as the roots are long, in drills twelve 
to eighteen inches apart; when the plants are three inches high, thin out to three inches apart 
in the row. Sow from September to November for winter, and January to March for spring 
and summer crops. 

Tlie Hollow CrowM, or Su^ar, is the kind generally cultivated; it possesses all 
the good qualities for which other varieties are recommended. 

PEAS. 

Pois (Fr.), Eebse (Ger.), Guisante (Sp.). 



EAKLIEST. 



Cleveland's Alaska, 2kfeet. 
Extra Early, or First and Best, 
Early Washington, 3 feet. 



2ifeet. 



Early Tom Thumb, Ifoot. 
Laxton's Alpha, 3 feet. 
American Wonder, li feet. 



Bishop's D waif Long Pod, Ik feet. 
Champjion of England, 5 feet. 
McLean's Advancer, 3 feet. 
Carter's Stratagem, 21 feet. 

Dwarf Blue Imperial, 3 feet. 
Royal Dwaif Marrow, 3 feet. 
Black Eyed 3Iarrowfat, 4 feet. 



SECOND CROP. 



McLean's Little Gem, l^feet. 
Laxton's Prolific Long Pod, 3 feet. 
Eugenie, 3 feet. 
Carter's Telephone, 5 feet. 

GENERAL CEOP. 

Large White Marrowfat, 4 feet. 
D waif Sugar, 2i feet. 
Tall Sugar, 6 feet. 



Peas are a fine vegetable, and therefore are very generally cultivated. It is best to plant in 
ground manured the previous year, else they will make more vines than peas. As a general 
thing the dwarf kinds require richer ground than the tall growing varieties. Marrowfat Peas 
planted in rich ground will not bear well, but they produce finely in sandy light soil. 

The Extra Early, Tom Thumb and Laxton's Alpha will not produce a large crop without 
being in rich ground. Peas have to be planted in drills two inches deep and from two to three 
feet apart, according to the height they may grow. Tom Thumb can be planted one foot apart, 
whereas White Marrowfat or Champion of England require three feet. The Extra Early, Alpha 
and Tom Thumb can be planted during August and September for fall. During November and 
December we plant the Marrowfat; January and February, as late as March, all kinds can be 
planted; but for the latter month only the earliest varieties should be used, as the late varieties 
will get mildewed before they bring a crop. Peas will bear much better if some brush or rods 
are stuck in the drills to support them, except the \ery dwarf kinds. 



Early Alaska. This is an extra early 
Pea, blue in color, the earliest by a few days of 
any other kind; very pure and prolific, the best 
flavored pea among the Extra Eaiiy smooth 
podded kinds. Recommend it highly. 

Extra Early, or First aud Best. 

This was the earliest Pea cultivated, until the 



Alaska was introduced; very popular with the 
small market gardeners here, who have rich 
grounds. It is very productive and well, 
flavored. The stock! sell is as good as any 
other in the country, not surpassed by any, 
no matter whose name is put before "Extra 
Early." 



56 



EICHAED FROTSCHER's ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



Early l¥a$!iiiig^toii, Early l^Iay 
or Frame, which are all nearly the same 
thing; is about ten days later than the Extra 
Early. It is very productive and keeps longer 
in bearing than the foregoing kind. Pods a 
little smaller. Very popular about New Orleans. 

Tom TImmb. Very dwarUsh and quite 
productive. Can be cultivated in rows a foot 
apart; requires no branches or sticks. 

I^axtoil's Alpha. This is the earliest 
wrinkled pea in cultivation; of delicious flavor 
and very prolific. This variety deserves to be 
recommended to all who like a first class pea. 
It will come into general cultivation when 
better known. 

American Wonder. A wrinkled pea 
of dwarf growth; 10 to 12 inches; it is prolific, 
early and of fine quality; it comes in after 
the Extra Early. 

Bisiiop's Dwarf Eong^ Pod. An 

early dwarf variety; very stout and branching, 
requires no sticks but simply the earth drawn 
around the roots. It is productive and of 
excellent quahty. 

Champion of Esig'lancl. A green 
wrinkled variety of very fine flavor; not 
profitable for the market, but recommended 
for famih^ use. 



McEeans' Advancer. This is an- 
other green, wrinkled variety, about two weeks 
earlier than the foregoing kind. 

McEean's Eittle Oem. A dwarf, 
wrinkled variety. It is early, very prolific 
and of excellent flavor. Kequires no sticks. 

Eaxton's Prolific Eong^ Pod. A 

green narrow pea of good quality. Pods are 
long and well flUed. It is second early, and 
can be recommended for the use of market 
gardeners, being very prolific. 

Eugenie. A white wrinkled variety, of 
fine flavor; it is of the same season as the 
Advancer. Cannot be too highly recommended 
for family use. 

Carter's Stratagem. This is a 
wrinkled variety from England. It is very 
distinct in vine and f oUage, growing thick and 
large, does not need any support. It is the 
Largest Podded variety ever brought out, pods 
4 — ol inches long, which cannot be surpassed 
in flavor, and is very productire. Recommekd 
it highly. 

Carter's Telephone. Another wrin- 
kled English late variety; grows about from 4i 
to 5 feet high. The pods are very long, con- 
taining from 8 — 12 fine flavored peas. It is 
productive; will bear twice as much as the 




Earlv Alaska. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



Champion of England which is about of the 
same season. 

Dwarf Blue Imperial. A very good 
iDearer if planted early, pods are large and well 
-filled. 

Royal Dwarf ITIarrow, Similar to 
the large Marrowfat, but of dwarf habit. 

Black-eyed Marrowfat. This kind 
is planted more for the marLetthan any other. 
It is very productive, and when young, quite 
tender. Grows about tonv feet high. 



liarg^e ll^liitc Marrow^fat. Similar 
to the last variety, except that it grows about 
two feet taller and is less productive. 

Dvi'arf Stig'ar. A variety of which the 
whole pod can be used after the string is drawn 
off from the back of the pod. Three feet 
high. 

Tall Sug'ar. Has the same qualities as 
the foregoing kind, only grows taller, and the 
pods are somewhat larger. Neither of these 
two varieties are very popular here. 




Carter's Telephone. 



58 



RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



THE PEA BUG. 

All peas grown near Philadelphia have small holes in them, caused by the sting of the Pea 
Bug, while the pod is forming, when it deposits its egg in it. Later the insect perfects itself 
and comes out of the dry pea, leaving the hole. 

The germ of the pea is never destroyed, and they gTow equally as well as those withoiit 
holes. Market gardeners in this neighborhood who have been planting these Extra Early Peas 
for years, vnll not take them without holes, and consider these a trade mark. 

FIELD OR COW PEAS. 

There are a great many varieties of Cow Peas, dilf erent in color and growth. They are 
planted mostly for fertilizing purposes and are sown broad-cast ; when in a good stand, and of 
sufficient height, they are plowed under. The Clay Pea is the most popular. There are several 
varieties called crowders, which do not grow as tall as the others, but produce a great many 
pods, which are used green, the same as snajD-beans, and if dried, like dried beans, make a very 
good dish. The crowders are of an oblong shape, almost pointed at one end; they are on an 
average larger than the other Field Peas. Lady Peas are small, white Avith a black eye; they 
are generally planted between corn, so that they can run up on it. Dry, they are considered 
the very best variety for cooking. 



PiMENT (Fr.), 

Bell or Bull Nose. 
Sweet Spanish ^lonsirous. 
Sweet Buby King. 
Golden Dawn Mango. 
Long Bed Cayenne. 



PEPPER 

Spanischek Pfekfek 



(Ger.'i, PniEXTo (Sp ). 

Bed Cherry, 
Bird Bye. 
Chili. 
Tabasco. 
Bed Cluster. 



Peppers -are tender and require to be raised in the hot-bed. Seed should be sown in 
January and when large enough transplanted into the ground in rows from one and a half to 
two feet apart, and a foot to a foot and a half in the rows. There are more Peppers raised 
here than in other sections of the country; the hot varieties are used for seasoning and making 
pepper sauce; the mild variety is highly esteemed for salad. Care should be taken not to grow 
different kinds close together, as they mix very readily. 

flavor, and can be shced and eaten as a salad, 
the same as the Spanish Monstrous. Single 
plants ripen from 8 to lU fruits, making this 



Sweet Spanish or Monstrous. 

A very popular variety, much cultivated. 
It is very mild, grows to a large size, tapering 
towards the end, and when green, is used as 
a salad. Superior for that purpose to any 
other kind. 

Sweet Pepper, Ruby King^. This 
variety grows to a larger size than the Sweet 
Spanish Monstrous, and is of different shape. 
The fruit is from 5 to 6 inches long by about 
3 to 4 inches in diameter, and of bright red 
color. It is remarkably mild and pleasant in 



variety both productive and profitable. A 
decided acquisition. 





Sweet Pepper Ruby King. 



Sweet Spanish, or Monstrous Pepper. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



59> 




Red Cherry Pepper. 




Long Red Cayenne Pepper. 

Oolden Davi^n Manifo. This sweet 
pepper attracted much attention for the last 
few years, and was admired by all who saw, 
it: I believe it to be all the originator claims 
for it. In shape and size it resembles the 
Bell. Color, a bright waxy golden yellow; very 
brilliant and handsome. Single plants ripen 
from twelve to twenty-fonr fruits, making 
them productive and profitable. The}^ are 




Red Cluster Pepper. 

entirely exempt from any fiery taste or flavor,, 
and can be eaten as readily as an apple. 

Bell or Bull IVose. Is a large oblong 
variety which is not sweet or mild, as thought 
by some people. The seeds are very hot. 
Used for pickling. 

Long* Red Cayenne. Is very hot 
and pungent. Cultivated here and used for 
pepper sauce and seasoning purjDOses. There 
are two varieties, one is long and straight, and 
the other like shown in cut, which is the onlj'- 
kind I keep. 

Red Cherry. A small roundish variety, 
very hot and productive. 

Bird Eye. Small, as the name indicates. 
It is very hot and used principally for pepper 
vinegar. 

C li i I i . A small variety, from three-fourths 
to an inch long. It is strong and used for 
pepper sauce; very prolific. 

Tabasco. True. Another small variety, 
used more for pepper sauces than any other 
kind; the fruit is easily gathered, growing 
almost erect on the branches; do not adhere 
to the stem when gathered. 

Red Cluster. A new variety of which 
the pods grow in bunches, upright like the 
Chili which the pods resemble, but are a little 
larger. It is quite distinct; ornamental on 
account of the bright friiit and compact 
growth of the plant. It is hot and pungent. 



POTATOiiS. 

PoMME DE Terre (Fr.), Kaktoffel (Ger.). 



Early Rose. 

Breese's Peerlesfi. 
Extra Early Vermont. 
Snowflake. 
Beauty of Hebron. 



X( 



White Elephant. 
Rural Blush. 
Rural New Yorker 
The Thorburn. 
Early Sunrise. 

tried on the grounds of the Louisiana 
La., and Audubon Park, New Orleans; 

among 150 different kinds tested they gave about the best results, both in 

yield and quality. 



The above varieties were 
Experiment Station at Calhoun, 



60 



RICHAED FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



Potatoes thrive and produce best in a light, dry but rich soil. Well decomposed stable 
manure is the best, but if not to be had, cotton seed meal, bone dust, or any other fertilizer 
should be used to make the ground rich enough. If the ground was planted the fall previous 
with Cow Peas, which were plowed under, it will be in good condition for Potatoes. Good 
sized tubers should be selected for i^lanting, which can be cut in pieces not too small, each piece 
ought to contain at least three eyes. Plant in drills from two to three feet apart, according to 
the space and how to be cultivated afterwards. Field culture, two and a half to three feet apart; 
for garden, two feet will answer. We plant potatoes here from end of December to end of 
March, but the surest time is about the first of February. If planted early they should be 
p)lanted deeper than if planted late, and hilled up as they grow. If potatoes are planted shallow 
and not hilled soon, they will suffer more, if caught by a late frost, than if planted deep and 
hilled up well. Early potatoes have not the same value here as in the North, as the time of 
planting is so long, and very often the first planting gets cut down by a frost, and a late 
planting, which may just be peeping through the ground, will escape and produce in advance 
of the first planted. A fair crop of potatoes can be raised here if planted in August; if the 
4iutumn is not too dr.y, they will bring nice tubers by the end of November. They should not 
be cut if planted at this time of the year, but planted whole. They should be put in a moist 




Extra Earlv Vermont. 




Snowflake. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



61 



place before planting, so they may sprout. The early varieties are preferable for this time of 
planting. 

I have been handling several thousand barrels of potatoes every season for planting, and 
make Seed Potatoes a specialty. The potatoes I sell are Eastern grown, which, as every one 
interested in potato culture knows, are superior and preferable to Western grown. 

I have tried and introduced all new kinds here; but of late so many have come out that it 
is almost impossible to keep up with them. New varieties of potatoes come out with fancy 
prices, but these prices for new potatoes do not pay here, as we can keep none over for seed, 
and any person raising for the market would not realize a cent more for a new fancy variety 
per barrel, than for a iDarrel of good Peerless or Early Rose. Earliness is no consideration, as 
we plant from December to end of March. Somebody may plant Early Rose in December and 
another in February, and those planted in February come to the market first; it depends 
entirely upon the season. If late frosts set in, early planted potatoes will be cut down, and 
those just coming oat of the ground will not be hurt. 




Rural Xew Yorker No 2. 




62 



EICHAED FEOTSCHEE'S ALMANAC AND GAEDEN MANUAL 



TTp to now the Peerless is the standard variety. Among the nevr kinds I haYe tried, I find 
the TVhite Elephant to be a fine potato. It is a very strong gi'ower, tubers oblong, very pro- 
dnctive. good quahty iind fiavor. It is late, and ^vill come in at the end of the season, if planted 
Avith the earlier Taiieties. The Extra Earlv Vermont. Beautv of Hebron, Snowflake and Earlv 
Piose tor early, and Peerless. T\'hite Elephant and Enral Xevr Yorker for late, are as good varie- 
ties as exist, and it is not likelv that vre vdll have anvthing better bv ne^* introductions. Tlie 
Eiu-al Blnsh. vrhich I introduced some vears ago. mav be added to the late varieties; it is of 
excellent Cjuality. strong grover and yields heavily. 3Iost people are not careful enough in 
selecting their seed. Some of the potatoes sold in this market for seed are not fit for planting. 



Early Ro§e.Thisis, \n.thout' any doubt, 
the best potato for the table. It is ovaL very 
shaUovr-eyed, pink-skinned, very di-y, and 
mealy when boiled. It has not become so 
piopular as it deserves as a market variety, as 
pink or red potatoes do not sell so well here as 
the white kinds. This variety should not be 
planted too soon, f roru the fact that they make 
small stalks, and if cut down by frost, they 
.-sufirer more than other varieties; btit they 
want rich, light soil to grow to perfection. 

Breese's Peerie§s. Several years ago 
this variety was introduced, yet at present 
it is the leading kind for market as well as 
for family use. Skin dull white, sometimes 
slightly inssetted: eyes few and shallow. round, 
occasionally oblong; grows to a large size; 
very iDroductive and earlier than the Jackson 
V^liite. As white potatoes are more salable 
than pinkish kinds, and as this variety is 
liandsome in appearance and of good quality, 
it has become the general favorite in this 
section. 

Extra Early VeriiiOBit- Very similar 
to the Early Kose. but of a stronger growth; 
•s. little earlier, and the tubers are more uniform 
and larger. It is an excellent table variety. 

Suowflake. This is an early variety. 
Tubers good, medium" size, elongated, very 
uniform and quite productive. Eyes fiat on 
the body of the tuber, but compressed on the 
seed end. Skin white, fiesh verv fine gi'ained. 
and when boiled, snow white. 

Beauty of Hebrou. I have tried 
this variety thoroughly and found it in every 
23articular as has been represented. It is ear- 
lier than the Early Eose, which resembles it 
very much, being a little lighter and more 
nissetted in color. It is productive and of 
excellent table qualitv; more mealv than the 
Early Eose. 

Tl'liite Elephant. This variety has 



again given entire satisfaction. The tubers 
are large and of excellent quality; x^lanted 
alongside of the Peerless, it produced fully one 
third more than that variety. 

Rural Blu<»ll. Second early, tubers 
roundish flattened, blush skin, fiesh shghted 
with pink. Very diy and of excellent equality. 
A heavy yielder and good keeper. 

Rural Xe^A' Yorker Xo. 2. Of re- 
cent introduction. This potato is the nearest 
to perfection of any yet introduced, and ex- 
ceeds all others in yield. It is of large 
size, very smooth skin; few eyes, distinct and 
shallow. Elesh very white, of excellent table 
quality. 

The Thorburn. This is one of the 
earliest potatoes introduced. It is of unex- 
celled quality, very productive. It is a seed- 
ling of the Beauty of Hebron, which it resem- 
bles, but is earlier and more productive. 

Early Sunrise. A variety of recent 
introduction. It_is early and fairly produc- 
tive. The tubers are medium, oblong and 

solid, uniform in shape and size. They are 
fit for the table when quite young. 

Triuuiph. An early variety of good 
quality; cultivated extensively in Tennessee 
and other Southern localities for shipping to 
!!s oi-thern markets. It is of a nice roirud shape, 
light red in color; earEer than the Early Eose 
and more proEfic. 




.ari\ 



rise. 



THE SWEET POTATO. 

Convolvulus Batatas. 
The Sweet Potato is next to corn the most important food crop in the South. They are a 
wholesome and nutritious cUet, good for man and beast. Though cultivated to a limited extent 
on the sandy lands of Xew Jersey and some of the middle States, it thrives best on the light 
rich lands of the South, which biing theh red and golden fruits to greatest perfection under 
the benign rays of a Southern sun. It is a plant of a warm climate, a child of the sun, much 
more nutritious than the Irish Potato on account of the gi-eat amount of sacchaiine matter it 
contains, and no Southern table should be found without it from the first day of August till the 
last day of May. Some plant early in sj^ring the potato itself in the prepared ridges, and cut 
the vine from the potato when large enough, and plant them out; others start the potatoes in a 
bed prepared exj)ressly for that purjjose, and sUp off the sprouts as they come up, and set these 
out. The latter method will produce the earliest potatoes; others who set the vines, say that 
they make the largest tubers. In prejDaring the land the soil shoiild be thoroughly ptilverized. 
the ridges laid off about five feet apart, well drawn up and rather fiat on top. If eveiything i^ 
Teady, and time for planting has arrived, do not wait for a rain, make a paste of clay and cow 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



63 



manure; in this dip the roots of the slips and press the earth tirmly around them. Old slips 
are more tenacious of life than young ones, and will under circumstances answer best. Water- 
ing afterwards, if dry weather continues, of course will be beneficial. Otherwise plant your 
vines and slips just before or after a rain. Two feet apart in the rows is considered a good 
distance. The ridges should never be disturbed by a plow from the time they are made until 
the potatoes are readj^ to be dug. 

Scrape off the grass and young weeds with the hoe, and piill up the large ones by hand. 
Crab grass is peculiarly inimical to the sweet potato, and should be carefully kept out of the 
patch. The vines should never be allowed to take root between the rows. Sweet potatoes 
should be dug before a heavy frost occurs; a very light one will do no harm. The earth should 
be dry enough to keep it from sticking to the potatoes. The old fashioned potato bank is the 
best arrangement for keeping them, the main points being a dry place and ventilation. 

Varieties (jenerally cultivated in the South, 



The Yam. Taking into consideration 
quality and productiveness, the Yam stands at 
the head of the list. Frequently, when baked, 
the saccharine matter in the shape of candy 
will be seen hanging to them in strings. Skin 
and flesh yellow and very sweet. Without a 
doubt the best potato for family use. 

(Southern Queen. Very similar to 
the former, but smoother, the tubers having 
no veins or very few; it is earlier. 



Shang^hai or California Yam. 

This is the earliest variety we have, frequently', 
under favorable circumstances, giving good 
sized tubers two months after planting the 
vine. Very productive, having given 300 
bushels per acre when planted early and on 
rich land. Is almost the only kind cultivated 
for the New Orleans market. Skin dull white 
or yellow, Hesh white, dry and mealy, in large 
specimens frequently stringy. 



Large round, 
very produc- 




Greeii Striped Cashaw Crook Neck. 



There are some other varieties of Sweet Potatoes highly prized in the West, but not appre- 
ciated here. The Ked and Yellow Nansemond are of a fine quality and productive, but will 
not sell so well as the California Yam when taken to market. For home consumption they are 
fine, and deserve to be cultivated. 

PUMPKIN. 

PoTiBON (Fr.), KiiEBiss (Ger.), 

Calabaza (Sp.). 

Kentucky Field. 

Large Cheese. 

Cashaw Crook Neck. ( Green Striped. ) 

Golden Yellow Mammoth. 

Are generally grown in the field, with 
the exception of the Cashaw which is 
planted in the garden; but great care 
must be taken not to plant them close to 
Squashes or Melons, as they will mix and 
spoil their quality. Plant in hills from 
eight to twelve feet apart, 

Kentucky Field. 

soft shell, salmon color 
tive; best for stock. 

Larg-e Ciieese. This is of 

a bright orange, sometimes salmon 
color, fine grained, and used for 
table or stock feeding. 

Cashaw Crook Xeck. 

This is extensively cultivated in 
the South for table use. There are 
two kinds, one all yellow and the 
other green striped with light 
yellow color. The latter is the 
preferable kind; the flesh is fine 
grained,' yellow, very sweet, and 
better than any Winter Squash. It 
keeps well; it takes the place here 
of the Winter Squashes, \vhich are 
very little cultivated. The striped 
variety has been cultivated here 
since a century and never was 
found North or West; since a few 
years it has been brought out by 
Northern Seedsmen as ^^ Japan 
Pie Pumpkin.'' I had this 

Golden Yellow Mammoth. 




64: 



RICHAKD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



kind grown alongside of the Southern Striped 
Cashaw and found it one and the same. 

Oolden Yellow Mainniotli. This 
is a very large Pumpkin. Flesh and skin are 
of a bright golden color, fine grained and of 



good quality, I had some brought to the store 
weighing one hundred to one hund]-ed and 
fifty pounds, raised on land which was not, 
manured or fertilized. 



E,ADIES, E.AVE (Fr.^ 

Early Long Scarlet. 

Chartier's Long. 

Early Scarlet Turnip. 

Golden (xlohe. 

Ecui-ly Scarlet Olive-shaped. 

White Summer Turnip. 

Scarlet Half Long French. 



RADISH. 

Kadies, Rettig (Ger.), Rabano (Sp.). 



Scarlet Olive-shaped, White-Tipped or 

French Breakfast. 
Black Spanish ( Winter). 
Chinese Rose (Winter). 
White Strashurgh. 
White California JIanimoth. 



This is a popular vegetable, and grown to a large extent. The ground for radishes should 
be rich and melloAV. The early small varieties can be sown broad-cast among other crops, such, 
as beets, peas, spinach, or where lettuce has been transplanted. Early varieties are sown in 
this section the whole year, but during summer they require frequent watering to make them- 
grow" quickly. The Golden Globe and White Summer Turnip are best for planting during the 
summer months. The Half Long Scarlet French is the only red kind raised for the New 
Orleans market, and all the other cities in the United States taken together do not use as many 
of that one variety as New Orleans does. I have sold nearlj^ two thousand pounds of the seed 
per annum for the last fourteen years. 



Early Long* Scarlet. This is a de- 
sirable variety; it is of a bright scarlet color; 
short top and brittle. 

Chartier's Long: Radish. Along 
Radish, described as deep crimson colored at 
the top, shading off lighter until at the bot- 
tom it becomes white. 

Early Scarlet THrni|>. A small 
round variety', the favorite kind for family use. 
It is very early, crisp and mild when young. 

CrOlden Olobe. This stands the heat 
better than the foregoing kinds. It is of an 
oblong shape, and of a beautiful bright yellow 
color. It should be sown very thinly. Best 
adapted for summer and fall sowing. The 
variety I keep is of the finest strain, and as 
good as any ever sold. 

Early Scarlet Olive-Shaped. This 

is similar to the Half Long French, but shorter, 
and not quite so bright in color. It is earl}^ 
and of good quality. Top short. 

White S II miner Turnip. This is 
a summer and fall variety. Oblong in shape, 
skin white, stands the heat well, but not much 
used. 

Scarlet Half Long; French. This 
is the most popular Radish for the market. 
It is of a bright scarlet color, and when well 
grown, from two to three inches long, very 
brittle and tender. 

Scarlet Olive-shaped. White tipped, 
or French Breakfast. A handsome 
Radish of the same shape as the foregoing 
kind, with end and root white. Quite tender. 

Black Spanish. (Winter.) This is 
sown diiring fall and early winter. It is oval 
in shape, solid, and stands considerable cold 
weather without being hurt. It can be sown 
broad-cast between Turnips, or planted in 



rows a foot apart, thinned out from three to 
four inches in the rows. 

Chinese Rose. (Winter.) This is of 
a half long shape, bright rose color. It is as 
hardy as the last described kind, not so popu- 
lar, but superior to the foregoing kind. Con- 
sider it the best winter variety, 




Earlv Long Scarlet. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



65 




Early Scarlet Turnip. 



Scarlet Half Long French. 



Golden Globe. 



White Strasbtirg-ti. This variety is of 
recent introduction, of an oblong, tapering 
shape ; the skin and Hesh are pure white, firm, 
brittle and tender, and has the tendency of re- 
taining its crispness even when the roots are 
old and large. It is a very good kind for sum- 
mer use, as it withstands the severe heat, and 
grows very quickly. The seed can be planted 



throughout the summer, and fine large roots 
will be rapidly formed. It is an excellent va- 
riety for family use, as well as for the market. 

White California, Mamiiioth. 

This is a winter variety of large size, but can 
be sown here in early spring. It is the largest 
of all Radishes, and grows from 8 to 12 inches 
long, 2 to 3 in diameter. 



Sown from September to March. 



ROQUETTE. 

ROQUETTE (Fr.). 

It is used as a salad, resembling the Cress in taste. 



SALSIFY OR OYSTER PLANT. 

Salsifis, Fr. , Hai'erwuezel (Ger.), Ostea Vegetal (Sp.j 

American. \ Sandwich Island (Mammoth). 

A vegetable which ought to be more cultivated than it is. It is prepared in different ways. 
It partakes of the flavor of oysters. It should be sown in the fall of the year; not later than 
November. The ground ought to be manured the spring previous, deeply spaded, and well 
pulverized. Sow in drills about ten inches apart, and thin out from three to four inches in the 
rows. 




American Salsitv. 




Sandwich Island Mammoth Salsifv 



66 



RICHAED FROTSCHER's ALMANA.C AND GARDEN MANUAL 



American Salsify. This kind used 
to be generally cultivated; but since the intro- 
duction of the Sandwich Island Mammoth the 
demand for it has decreased considerably. 

Saiidwicli Island §aisify. (Mam- 
moth.) This is a sort which grows much 



quicker than the old varieties. It attains a 
large size; can be called ^ith right mammoth. 
It is very superior to the old kinds and should 
be generally cultivated. 



Epinaed (Fr. 
Extra Large Leaved Savoy. 



SPINACH. 

Spinat (Ger.), Espinago (Sp.). 

I Broad Leaved Flanders. 



A great deal of this is raised for the New Orleans Market. It is very popular. Sown from 
September to end of March. If the fall is dry and hot, it is useless to sow it, as the seeds 
require moisture and cool nights to make them come up. The richer the ground the larger 
the leaves. 



Extra Liarge L<eaved Savoy. The 

leaves of this variety are large, thick and a 
little curled. Very good for family use. 



Broad L.eaved Flanders. This is 
the standard variety, both for market and 
family use. Leaves large, broad and succulent. 



SORREL. 

OsEiLLE (Fr,), Sauebampfek (Ger.), Acedeea (Sp.). 

Planted in drills a foot apart, during the fall of the year, and thinned out from three to four 
inches in the drills. Sorrel is used for various purposes in the kitchen. It is used the same as 
Spinach; also in soups and as a salad. 

SQUASH. 

CouRGE (Fr.), KiiEBiss (Ger.), Calabaza Tontanera (Sp.). 



Early Bush, or Fatty Fan. 

Long Green, or Summer Crook Neck. 



The Huhhard. 
Boston Marrow. 



Sow during March in hills from three to four feet apart, six to eight seeds. When well uji, 
thin them out to three of the strongest plants. For a succession they can be planted as late 
as June. Some who protect by boxes, plant as soon as the first of February, but it is best to 
wait until the ground gets warm. When it is time to plant Corn, it is also time to plant Squash. 



Early Busli, or Patty Pan. Is 

the earliest and only popular kind here. All 
other varieties are very little cultivated, as the 
Green Striped Cashaw^ Pumpkin takes their 
place. It is of dwarfish habit, grows bushy, 
and does not take much room. Quality as 
good as any. 

Long: Oreen, or Summer Crook- 
Neck. This is a strong grower, and con- 



tinues in bearing longer than the first named 
kind. It is of good quality, but not so popular. 

The Hubbard. This is a Winter 
Squash, highly esteemed in the East, but 
hardly cultivated here. It is, if planted here, 
inferior to the Southern Striped Cashaw 
Pumpkin which can be kept from one season 
to another, and is superior in flavor to the 
former kind. 






Earlv Bush or Patty Pan. 



Lona- Green or ynmnier Crook Xcck. 



The Huhbard. 



FOE THE SOUTHERN STATES, 



67 



Boston Marrow. Cultivated to a large 
extent North and East for winter use, where 
it is used for custards, etc. It keeps for a 
long time and is of excellent quality, but not 



esteemed here, as most people consider the 
Southern grown Cashaw Pumpkin superior to 
anj!- winter Squash. 



TOMATO. 

TOMATE (Fr.j LlEBESAPFEL (Gcr.), TOMATE (Sp. ). 



King of ihe EarUes. 
Extra Early Dwarf Bed. 
Jlorsford's Prelude. 
Dwarf Champion. 
Trophy, (Selected). 
Large Yelloio. 



Acme. 
Faragoii. 

Livingston's Perfection. 
Livingston s Favorite. 
Livingston' s Beauty. 



Seed should be sown in January, in hot beds, or in boxes, which must be placed in a 
sheltered spot, or near windows. In March they can be sown in the open ground. Tomatoes 
are generally sown too thick and become too crowded when two or three inches high, which 
makes the plants thin and spindly. If they are transplanted when two or three inches high, 
about three inches apart each way, they will become short and sturdy, and will not suffer when 
planted into the open ground. Plant them from three to four feet apart. Some varieties can 




King of the Earlies. 



68 



EICHAKD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



be planted closer; for instance, the Extra Early, which is of very dwarfish habit, two and a half 
feet apart is enough. 

They should be supported by stakes. When allowed to grow up wild, the fruit which 
touches the ground will rot. For a late or fall crop the seed should be sown towards the latter 
part of May and during June. 



King* of the Earlier. This variety 
was introduced here hj me a few years ago. 
It is \evj early and productive ; color bright 
red, of good size and quite solid. The vine 
is medium, stout and branching. The buds 
appear soon, blossoms as a rule adhere and 
produce fruit. It is so much earlier than the 
Livingston varieties, that it should be planted 
for the first. The latter kind are so hand- 
some in shape, that they will sell better than 
any other, when the market is once well 
supplied. 



Extra Early Dwarf. This is the 
earJiest in cultivation. It is dwarfish in habit; 
fi-uit larger than the following kind, and more 
flat ; bright scarlet in color and very productive. 
For an early market variety it cannot be sur- 
passed. 

Horsford's Prelude. This is a valu- 
able variety on account of being very early. 
The skin is very tough and perfectly free from 
rot. Fruit medium in size. It is of excellent 
flavor, specially adapted for forcing as well as 
outdoor culture. 




HorsforfVs Prelude. 



FOR THE SOUTHEKN STATES, 



69 





Acme Tomato. 



^ l.ivingston'.s Favorite. 

I>wai'f Champion. This is 
a distinct kind. The plants grow 
stiff and upright, and need no support 
as other kinds. Can be planted closely 
together, three feet apart. It is early 
and productive; the fruit resembles 
the Acme; but is of lighter color, 
ripens up even and does not crack. 
When room is an object this sort is 
recommended. 

Early La I'lii^e l§iiiootli Red. 

kn early kind of medium size; smooth 
and productive. 

Selected Trophy, A very 
large, smooth Tomato, more solid 
and heavier than any other kind. 
Has become a favorite variety. 

Larg-e Yellow. This is similar 
in shape to the Large Ked, but more 
solid. Not very popular. 

Acme. This is one of the prettiest 
and most solid Tomatoes ever intro- 
duced. It is of medium size, round 
and very smooth, a strong grower, 
and a good and long bearer. It is the 
perfection of Tomatoes for family use, 
but will not answer for shij^ping pur- 
poses; the skin is too tender, and 
cracks when fully ripe. Of all the 
varieties introduced, none has yet 
surpassed this kind when all qualities 
are brought into consideration. It 
does well about here where the ground 
is heavy. 

Parag'on. This is a very solid 
variety, of a bright reddish crimson 
color, comes in about the same time 
as the Tilden, but is heavier in foliage, 
and protects its fruit. It is produc- 
tive and keeps long in bearing. Well 
adapted for shipping. 

Living^stoii'ii^ Perfecfioii. 

Very similar to the foregoing in shape 
and color. 

L.iving:$t Oil's Favorite. 

This Tomato was introduced only a 
few years ago; it is as perfect in 
shape and as solid as the Acme, but 



70 



RICHARD FROTSCHERS AKMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




Selected Trophy. 




Livingstou's heauty, 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



71 



much larger, and of a handsome dark 
red color. I had some sent to me by 
a customer, and they surely were the 
linest specimen of tomatoes I ever 
saw, and were admired by everybody 
who saw them. They will keep well, 
and do not crack. It has become the 
standard variety for this market. 

L.iviiigrston's Beauty. This 
variety is of recent introduction. It 
is quite distinct in color, being a \evy 
glossy crimson with a light tinge of 
purple, (lighter than the Acme). It 
ripens with the Acme or Paragon, but 
keeps longer. It is very perfect in 
shape and does not crack, like some 
of the thin skinned sorts. 



TURNIP. 

Navet (Fr.), KiiBE (Ger.), 
Nabo Comun (Sp.). 
Early Red or Purple Top (strap-leaved). 
Early White Flat Dutch (strap-leaved). 
Purple Top Globe. 
Large White Globe. 
Pomerian Globe. 
White Spring. 
Yellow Aberdeen. 
Golden Ball. 
Amber Globe. 

Early Purple Top Munich. 
Improved Ruta Baga. 
Long Island Purple Top Ruta Baga. 
Extra Early White French, or White 
Egg Turnip. 




Parasoii, 



Turnips do best in new ground. When the soil has been worked long, it should receive a 
top dressing of land-plaster or ashes. If stable manure is used the ground should be manured 
the spring previous to sowing, so it may be well incorporated with the soil. When fresh 
manure is used the turnips are apt to become speckled. Sow from end of July till October for 
fall and winter, and in January, February and March for spring and summer use. They are 
generally sown broad-cast, but the Kuta Baga should be sown in drills, or rather ridges, and 
should not be sown later than the end of August; the Golden Ball and Aberdeen not later than 
the end of September. The White Flat Dutch, Early Spring and Pomerian Globe are best 
for spring, but also good for autumn. 



£arly Red or Purple Top. (Strap- 
Leaved.) This is one of the most popular 
kinds. It is flat, with a small^tap-root, and 
a bright purple top. The leaves are narrow 
and grow erect from the bulb. The flesh is 
tinely grained and rich. 

Early ^Vliite Flat Dutch. (Strap- 
Leaved. ) This is similar to the above in shape, 
but considered about a week earlier. It is very 
popular. 



Purple Top Oiobe. Of same shape 
as the Pomerian Globe, but with purple top. 
Fine variety for table and for stock. It is not 
quite so early as the Early Red or Purple Top. 
I recommend it very highly. 

L.arg:e White Oiobe. A very large 
kind; mostly grown for stock. It can be used 
for the table when young. Flesh coarse, but 
sweet; tops very large. 



72 



RICHARD FROTSCHERS ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




o 

> 

o 

S3 



O 

e5 






Poilieriail Olobe. This is selected 
from the foregoing. It is smoother and hand- 
somer in shape; good to plant early in spring. 
"When pulled before it is too large it is a very 
salable turnip in the market. 

White Spring'. This is similar to the 
White Flat Diitch; not quite so large, but 
rounder in shape. The tops are larger; it is 
early, a good quality, and best adapted for 
spring planting. 

Yellow Aberdeen. This is a variety 
very little cultivated here. It is shaped like 



the Euta Baga, color yellow with purple top. 
Good for table use or feeding stock. 

Robertson's Golden Ball, is the 

best of the Yellow Turnips for table use. It 
is very smooth, oval in shape, and of a beau- 
tiful orange color. Leaves are small. Should 
be sown in the fall of the year, and always in 
drills, so that the plants can be thinned out 
and worked. This kind ought to be more 
cultivated. 



Amber Globe. 

the above kind. 



This is verv similar to 



FOK THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



73 




Pomerian Globe. 



Extra Early Purple Top 
Mlliiicii. A new kind from Ger- 
many; flat, with red or purple top; 
same as the Americiin variety, but 
fifteen days earlier to mature. It is 
very hardy, tender, and of fine 
flavor. 

Improved Purple Top 
Ruta Bag'a. This is grown for 
feeding stock, and also for table use. 
It is oblong in shajDe, yellow flesh, 
very solid. Should alwaj^s be sown 
in rows or ridges. 

Eoiig^ IslaiBd Purple Top 
Ruta Sa§^a. This kind is purely 

of American origin. The root is 
smoother than the foregoing variety; 
the flesh is of golden yellow, fine 
grained and solid; it is earlier to ma- 
ture. The stock I have is expressly 
grown for me on Long Island and 
cannot be surpassed. Cannot be too 
highly recommended. 

Extra Early White 
French, or White Egg: 
Turnip. This is a lately intro- 
duced variety; is said to be very 
early; tender and crisp. The shape 
of it is oblong, resembling an egg. 
Having tried it, I found it as repre- 
sented, quickly growing, tender and 
sweet. It will never become a favorite 
market variety, as only flat kinds sell 
well in this market. It has to be 
pulled up soon, as it becomes pithy 
shortly after attaining maturity. 





Munich Extra Early Purple Top. 



Early White Flat Dutch (strap-leaved) 



74 



RICHARD FROTSCHER's ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




Purple Top Globe. 




Extra Early White French, or White Egg Turnip. 



Improved Pnrple Top Ruta Baga. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES- 



75 



DIRECTIONS FOR PLANTING. 

The directions given here are for Southern Louisiana. If applied to localities north of here, 
the time of planting will not be quite as early in the Spring and earlier in the Fall. For instance, 
the directions given for January will answer for February in the northern part of this State 
and Mississippi and the southern part of Alabama. In autumn, directions for September can 
be followed in August. For the middle and southern part of Florida, sowing can be done 
much earlier in the Spring and in the Fall much later than in Louisiana. In the northern part 
of Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas, as well as in the southern part of Alabama, very little can 
be planted in November and December. 

JANUARY. 



In this month Spinach, Mustard, Carrots, 
Beets, Turnips and Leeks may be sown, also, 
early varieties of Radish, and for the last crop 
the Black Spanish, White California Mam- 
moth and Chinese Rose. 

Early varieties of Turnip and Ruta Baga 
for table use can be sown yet. 

Sow Lettuce, Endive, Cabbage, Broccoli. 
Kohlrabi and early Cauliflower. As the 
weather is very unstable, it is best to sow in 
a frame and protect the young plants during 
severe cold weather. 

Cress, Chervil, Parsley and Celery, the latter 
for cutting, should be sown; also, Roquette 
and Sorrel. 

If the hot-bed has not been prepared already 
during the previous month, it should be done 
at once, to sow now Egg Plants, Pepper and 
Tomatoes; the latter can be sown a little 
later than the former. 

All kinds of Herb Seeds may be sown dur- 
ing this month. 

Plant Peas for general crop, such as Black- 
Ej^ed and large White Marrowfat, Champion 
of England, Eugenie, Stratagem, Telephone 
and other varieties. Towards the end of this 
month the Extra Early varieties, like First and 
Best, Little Gem and Alaska may be planted. 

Plant Potatoes. Tlie Early Rose should not 
be planted before the latter part of this month, 
but Peerless and other second early varieties 
may be planted after the first. 

Divide and transplant Shallots, also set out 
Cabbage plants sown in November. 



Onions if not already transplanted should 
be hurried now, so that they may have time 
to bulb. Those who desire to raise Onion 
sets, should sow the seeds toward the end of 
this month, as Onion sets which are set out 
early in the Fall can be sold earlier than those 
raised from seed. 

It is better to sow Onion seed for sets in 
February, as they generally get too large if 
sown in this month. Northern seed will not 
make any sets in our climate. 

Asparagus roots should be set out this 
month; also Red Oats may be sown. I con- 
sider this and the German Millet, which ought 
to be sown in March, the two best annual 
forage plants for Louisiana. 

Cucumber seed can be planted now for 
forcing. It is best to plant the seed in llower 
pots first, and when the third leaf is developed, 
transplant into the hot-bed. 

Although Cucumbers for shipping are 
mostly planted in November and December, 
if the hot-bed is properly made, those planted 
in this month wall bear better than those 
planted in November. 

Fruit trees of all kinds, such as Pear, Plum, 
Peach, Apple and Orange should be planted 
now. 

Sow Pecans now. Continue to sow flower 
seeds during this month, for Spring and early 
Summer blooming. 



FEBI^UARY. 



AH winter vegetables can be sown this 
month, such as Spinach, Mustard, Carrots, 
Beets, Parsnips and Leeks. Also, the early 
varieties of Radishes, White Spring and Early 
Purple Top Turnip, Swiss Chard and Kohl- 
rabi, Lettuce, Cabbage and Early Cauliflower 
may be sown. If the weather is favorable and 
the month of April dry, the latter will succeed 
well. 

Cauliflower and Cabbage Plants should be 
transplanted. Shallots divided and set out 
again; also, sow Sorrel, Roquette, Chervil, 
Parsley, Cress and Celery for seasoning, if not 
sown already. 

All varieties of Peas can be planted in this 
month, especially the early varieties. The 
later varieties are best planted in Januarj^, but 
if planted in the early part of February they 
will do well. 



February is the best month to plant the 
general crop of Potatoes, as on an average they 
will succeed better if planted during this- 
month than any other. 

Sweet Herbs should be jolanted, the most 
tender varieties in a frame, and afterwards 
transplanted into the open ground. 

This is the proper month to sow Asparagus 
seed, also to plant the roots of this vegetable, 
if not done so previously. 

Hot-beds, on account of the changeable 
weather during this month, require a good 
deal of attention. Give air when the sun 
shines and the weather is pleasant, otherwise 
plants will become spindlj" and long legged. 
If too thick, thin them out, so that they maj^ 
become sturdy. 

You may begin to plant Bush Beans as soon, 
as the weather permits; also Cucumbers,. 



76 



RICHAED FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



Sqnash and Melons may be planted, as they 
often sncceed if protected by small boxes 
covered witli glass, as most gardeners do here; 
there is no risk at all. 

At the end of this month. Early Corn can 
be planted. For market use, Adam's Extra 
Early and Early White Flint are planted. 1 
recommend the Sugar varieties for family use; 
biit as they are more tender than the preceding, 
they should only be plant-ed during this month, 
if the ^"eather is extremely favorable, other- 
wise it is better to wait until Mai'ch. They 
are just as large as the above mentioned varie- 
ties, especially Stowell's Evergreen, which is 



as large as any grown. I consider it the best 
for family use. 

Mangel Wurzel and Sugar Beets should be 
sown this month for stock food. Sweet pota- 
toes may be put in a bed for sprouting, so as 
to have eariy shps. 

Plant fi-uit trees of all kinds, especially 
Orange and Pecan trees. Pecans may be sown 
yet during this month to raise trees fi'om. 

Sow Flower seed for late Spring and early 
Summer, such as Zinnia. Balsams in a frame, 
Torenia. different varieties of Amaranthus, 
Gomphrenas. etc. 



MARCH. 



Sow Beets. Kadishes and early varieties of 
Cabbage. Kohlrabi. Lettuce, Spinach. Mus- 
tard. Carrots. S^xiss Chard and Leek: also. 
Celery for cutting. Parsley, Rocxuette. Cress 
and Chervil. Towards the end of this month 
sow Endive. 

Sow the Eoyal Cabbage Lettuce; also Drum- 
head and Peiiug-nan. The White Paris Coss 
is a favorite variety for Spiing: the Butter- 
head will run into seed too quickly, and should 
not be sown later than the middle of Febraary 
in this latitude. 

Phmt now all varieties of Bush and Pole 
Beans; but for Lima Beans it is better to wait 
until the end of this month, as they rot easily 
when the gi"ound is not warm enough or too 
wet. 

Squash. Cucumbers, Melons and Okra can 
be planted. The remark in regard to Lima 

Earlv varie- 



Beans holds good also for Okra. 



ties of Peas may still be planted; set out To- 
matoes, Egg Plants and Peppers in the open 
ground and sow seed for latter crop. Plant 
Sweet Corn. 

Potatoes may still be planted, but all de- 
pends upon the season. Some years they do 
as well as those planted during the previous 
month. Tn fact I have seen the finest crop 
raised from Potatoes which had been planted 
on the loth of this month. 

Beans are hard to keep in this chmate. and 
therefore, hardly any are planted at this time 
of the year for shelling pui^^oses. Sweet Po- 
tatoes can be planted yet; also, Fruit Trees 
at the early pai-t of this month, or even later 
if the season is somewhat retarded. 

At the end of this month sow Sorghum, 
Kaffir Com and ]\Iilo Maize for stock food, 
also Teosinte. Sow Lespedeza at the begin- 
ning of this month. 



APRIL. 



Lq this month sow Bush. Pole and Lima 
Beans, Sweet Corn, Cucumbers. Squash, Mel- 
ons and Okra. Beets, Carrots, Swiss Chard, 
Eadishes, Lettuce, Mustard, Endive, Eoquette, 
Cress. Parslev. Chervil and Celerv for cutting. 

Sow Tomatoes, Egg Plants and Peppers. 

It is rather late to sow Cabbage seed now, 
biit if sown, the early varieties may be suc- 
cessfully used. Kohh-abi can still be sown, but j 
it is best to sow thinly in drills a foot apart, 
and thin out to four inches in the rows, in- 
stead of transplanting. Towards the end of 
this month a sowing of the late Italian Cauli- 
flower can be made, as it takes from eight to 
nine months to mature, and, therefore, should 
be sown eaiiy. 

It is always best to make several sowings, 
so that, in case one should fail, the other may 
be used. 

The Italian Cauliflower is hai'dier than the 
French and German vaiieties. A good plan 
is to sow the seed in boxes elevated two or 



three feet above the ground, as it ^illkeep the 
Cabbage-fly off. The plants should be over- 
looked daily, and all green Cabbage-worms 
and other vermin removed. 

Plant Sweet Potato Slips for early crop, dig 
Lish Potatoes planted early, and after well 
preparing the gi'ound, plant Corn, Beans, 
Squash, etc., in it. 

Sow Cashaw and Field Pumpkins. 

German !Millet should be sown this month. 
The ground ought to be well plowed and 
harrowed. Three pecks of seed is the quantity 
to be sown per acre. After sowing roU the 
ground well, and the seed will require no other 
covering. K no roller is handv, some bru.sh 
tied together ought to be passed over the 
ground sown, and this will effectively cover 
the seed. For hay. it should be cut when in 
flower. 

Every planter should give this forage plant 
a triid. 



MAY. 



Diiring this month vers- few vegetable^can 
be sown. Hardly any of the winter varieties 
if sown now will do well. The ground should 
be occupied by growing crops. 

Where Potatoes and Onions were taken ujd, 



Corn, Melons. Cucumbers, Squash and Pump- 
kins may be planted. 

No Cabbage excepting the .Creole can be 
sown this month, as this is supposed to stand 
the heat better than other varieties, but it 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



77 



does not form a solid head and nans into seed 
as early as the end of November. 

Yellow and White Summer Radishes and 
Endive may be sown. 

During the hot weather Lettuce requires a 
good deal of water, as it will, if neglected, 
soon become hard and tasteless. In fact, it is 
combined with a good deal of labor to raise 
good Lettuce during the Summer months. 
The Perpignan is the best for Summer use. 
Okra can still be sown. 

Large White Solid Gelerj^ may be sown 
now, but must be well shaded, and if the 
weather is dry, should be regularly w^atered. 

Late Italian Cauliflower may be sown. 

Cow Peas can be planted now between the 
Corn; or the Crowders in rows, the latter is 
the best to be used green. If Cow Peas are 
soM^n for fertilizing purposes, one bushel per 
acre should be used and plowed under when 
the ground is well covered with vines, or 
sometimes they are left until fall, when they 



commence to decay, and then plowed down. 
It is best, however, to plow them down when 
they have the most foliage, that is whilst they 
are blooming, as they then contain the most 
fertilizing properties. I consider Cow Peas 
the cheapest and most beneficial fertilizer for 
worn out land. 

Sweet Potato slips can be set out yet, taking 
advantage of an occasional rain; but if it does 
not rain, they must be watered. As the top 
of Shallots gets dr}^ which indicates their 
being rij^e, they are tit to be taken up. 

Pull them up and expose to the sun for a 
few days, and then store away in a dry, airy 
place, taking care not to lay them too thick, 
as thej^ are liable to heat. 

Lima or Pole Beans can be planted; the 
Southern Prolific is the best variety for late 
planting. 

Sorghum can be planted yet, and as it resists 
considerable drought, will do fairly well. 



JUNE. 



The sowing during this month is similar to 
the preceding; that is, not a great deal can be 
sown. The growing crops will require atten- 
tion as weeds grow fast now. 

Corn may be planted for the last supply of 
roasting ears; also, a few Water and Musk 
Melons. Cucumbers, Squash and Pumpkins 
planted during this month, generally do well; 
but if the weather is hot and dry, they require 
an abundance of water. 

Southern Prolific Pole Beans are the best to 
plant yet this month, as they stand more heat 
than any other variety. Continue to set out 
Sweet Potato Slips. 

Sow Yellow and White Summer Radishes; 
Endive for Salad, also Royal and Perpignan 

Lettuce. 

To sow Lettuce during the Summer months 
requires a great deal of attention; in fact, it 
requires more care than most people are wil- 
ling to bestow. 

Before sowing, soak the seeds for half an 
hour in water, take them out and put in a 
piece of cloth and place in a cool spot — under 
the cistern, or if convenient in an ice box. 
Keep the cloth moist, and in two or three days 
the seed will sprout. Then sow them. It is 
best to do so in the evening, and give a good 
Avatering. 



If the seeds are sown without being sprout- 
ed, ants will be likely to carry them away be- 
fore they can germinate, and the seedsman be 
blamed for selling seeds that did not grow. 
This sprouting has to be done from May to 
September, or, if the weather is warm and 
dry in the latter month, up to the middle of 
October. 

Should the weather be moist and cool in 
the fall, it can be dispensed with. 

Some late Cabbage for Winter crops may be 
sown in this month, as the plants are generally 
easier raised during this than the following 
months; but I consider this month too earlj' 
for Cabbage seed, as the plants become too- 
hard and long-legged before they can be trans- 
planted. 

Late Italian Giant Cauliflower may be sown 
yet at the early part of this month; towards 
the end the Early Giant can be sown. Some 
cultivators transplant them, when large 
enough, at once from the seed-bed into the 
open ground; others plant them first into 
flower pots, and transplant into the ground 
later. However, if transplanted at this time 
of the year, they will have to be shaded for a 
few days and watered until they have taken a 
good hold. 

Sow Tomatoes for late crop towards the end 
of this month. 



JULY. 



Towards the end of this month, plant Pole 
and Bush Beans. In the early part, sow 
Tomatoes for the last crop; also, some Corn 
for roasting ears. 

If the weather is favorable, Corn may be 
planted also for stock food. Cucumbers can 
be planted for pickling; also. Early Giant 
Cauliflower, Endive, Lettuce, Yellow and 
White Summer Radishes. 

In new ground some TurnijDS and Ruta 
Bagas can be sown, but it is better to wait 



until next month, as thej' are apt to become 
hard and stringy. 

After the 15th of this month. Cabbage, such 
as Frotscher's Superior Large Late Flat Dutch, 
Improved Drumhead, Crescent City Flat 
Dutch, Stein's Early Flat Dutch, St. Denis 
or Chou Bonneuil and Brunswick may be 
commenced with. The above are the leading 
kinds. 

It is very hard in our climate to say which 
is the best time to sow, as our seasons differ 
so much. 



78 



EICHARD FEOTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



Some seasons ^ve have early frosts, other 
seasons not before January, and Cabbage is 
most easily hui't by frost when heading np. 
When the plants are small yet, or half gi-own, 
or when they are headed up, they are not so 
mnch affected by cold weather. It is there- 
fore necessary to make two or three sowings 
at different times, so that in case some of the 
Cabbage is destroyed by frost, the other is 
coming on. As a general rule plants raised 
fi-om seed sown in July and August give the 
best results, they are almost sure to head. 

SeiDtember, in my experience, is the most 
unfavorable month for sowing Cabbage; as 
generally plants raised from seed sown in 
September are ready to head when frost sets 
in, and therefore, more liable to be hurt. Still 
there are some exceptions. Some years ago, 
the seed sown in September turned out best, 
because we had no frost until very late in the 
season, 

Brunswick is the earliest of the large grow- 
ing varieties and should be sown in July and 
August, so that it may be headed up when 
cold weather sets in. It is more tender than 
the Flat Dutch and Drumhead. The same 



may be said in regard to the St. Denis and 
Improved Early Summer. 

All Cabbage require a strong, good soil, but 
the Bi-unswick and Flat Dutch in i3articular. 

The ground should be well fertilized, vdth 
either stable manure. Cotton Seed Meal or 
Supei-phosphate; but I consider Cow Peas 
l^lanted on the Cabbage land and plowed un- 
der, the best and cheapest fertilizer. 

The standard varieties, Superior Flat Dutch 
and Improved Drumhead, should be sown at 
the end of this month and during the next. 

A large quantity of seed must fee sown at 
this time of the year, as it is sometimes very 
difficult to get a proper stand, and it is always 
better to have some plants left over than to 
be short. 

It is a very difficult matter to jsrotect the 
young Cabbage plants from the ravages of the 
insects, which are, especially after a mild 
Winter, very plentiful. 

Strong Tobacco water or Tobacco dust has 
been found very beneficial; also Tobacco 
stems, cut fine and scattered over the ground, 
will keep them off to some extent. Still some- 
times even these remedies will fail. 



AUGUST. 



During this month gardeners in the South 
are very busy with sowing and planting. Bush 
Beans. Extra Early and Washington Peas can 
be planted; also continue to sow Late Cab- 
bages, Dntmhead Savoy, Broccoli, Brussels 
Sprouts and Kale. Sow Early Italian Cauli- 
flower at the early part of this month. This 
is the pro^Der time to sow the Half Early Paris 
and other early varieties. 

Sow Parsley, Koquette, Chervil, Lettuce, 
Endive and Sorrel; but if the weather should 
be very dry, these seeds have to be frequently 
waterexl. It is best to cover Parsley seed with 
moss or brush, until it begins to come up. 

YeUow Turnip and White Strasburg Eadish 
may be sown during this month, and towards 
the" end commence to sow the red varieties, 
such as Scarlet Turnip. Half Long French 
and Long Scarlet, also Black Spanish. 

Sow Swiss Chard, Mustard and Cress, all 
varieties of Turnip and Euta Baga, and also 
Vienna Kohlrabi. 



If not too hot and diy. Beets of all kinds 
may be put in the ground; but it is better to 
wait until the f olloTs-ing month. 

Carrots may be sown in the latter part, if 
the weather is favorable; but if hot and dry, 
it is useless to do much, as seeds cannot come 
up well without being watered. 

White Sohd, Dwarf Large Eibbed and Per- 
fection Heartwell Celery should be sown 
now. 

Set out Shallots. Eed and "SMiite Kidney 
Beans for shelling should be planted at the 
early part of this month. 

Early Eose and other varieties of Potatoes 
saved from the Spring crop, should be planted 
early this month for a winter crop; the small- 
est Potatoes are selected for that purpose and 
planted whole. Set out Tomato plants for a 
late croj), if not done so last month. 

If Celery plants are set out during this 
month, they require to be shaded. 



SEPTEMBER. 



Mostly all the seeds recommended for last 
month can be sown this month, but some 
more should be added to them. 

In the early part plant Bush Beans, as they 
will bear before fi'ost sets in. Also plant early 
varieties of Peas, such as Extra Early, Early 
Alaska. Washington. All kinds of Eadishes, 
Carrots, Beets, Parsnip, Salsify, Eoquette, 
Cher^-il, Parsley, Sorrel, 
dive, Leeks, Turnips, 
Early Cauhflower, Kale, 
and Mustard can be sown during this month. 

Begin sowing Creole Onion seed after the 
loth of this month. As this is one of the 
most important crops, it should not be ne- 



Cress, Lettuce, En- 
Kohlrabi, Broccoh, 
Celerv. Corn Salad 



glected. Our Planters and Truck Farmers in 

the neighborhood of our city make their first 
sowing by the loth of this month. If the 
weather is hot and dry, it is necessary to cover 
the seed-beds with moss, after the seed has 
been sown; it will keep the seed moist and in- 
sure its coming up. As soon as the young 
plants make their appearance, the moss must 
be taken off. For main crop the end of this 
month is the j^roper time. 

Transplant Celery plants in ditches made 
for that purpose, and if the weather is favor- 
able, set out Cabbage and Cauliflower jjlants. 

If the weather is not too hot and dry, 
Spinach may be sown, but has to be kej^t well 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



79 



watered, otherwise it is impossible to get a 
stand. 

Some Cabbage seed may be sown yet, but 
Cabbage sown in this month will generally 
not do as well as seed sown during the previous 
month. 



Set out Shallots, divide and transplant Sor- 
rel; sow Turnip-rooted Celery. 

During this month Flower seeds, such as 
Pansies, Daisies, Sweet Alyssum, Candytuft, 
Stocks, Phlox, Chinese and Japan Pinks, 
Aster, etc., can be sown. 



OCTOBER. 



This is the month when Artichokes should 
be dressed, the suckers or sprouts taken off 
and transplanted. 

Onion seed can still be sown up to the 10th 
of this month; but it is better to get it in the 
ground as soon as possible, so that the plants 
get large enough before cold weather comes on. 

Towards the end of this month. Black 
Eyed Marrowfat Peas and English Windsor 
Beans can be planted. 

Sow Cabbage, Spinach, Cauliflower, Broc- 
coli, Brussels Sprouts, Kale, Mustard, Swiss 
Chard, Carrots, Beets, Salsify, Leeks, Corn 
Salad, Parsley, Boquette, Chervil, Kohlrabi, 
Kadishes, Lettuce, Endive and Parsnip. 

Shallots set out previously may be divided 
and set out again. 

Salsify, which does very finely here, must 
in order to obtain the best results be sown 
now; it is generally sown too late. It requires 
a fine mellow ground, which has been deeply 



spaded, as the size and smoothness of the 
roots depend upon the preparation of the soil. 

Do not manure the beds fresh, but use such 
lands for Salsify which has been well manured 
in the spring. At the end of this month some 
of the Celery which has been planted early 
may be earthed up. Water it frequently with 
soap water. 

Rye, Barley and Bed Oats shoiild be sown 
for stock food; also Orchard Grass, Red and 
White Clover, and Alfalfa or Lucerne. 

Transplant Strawberry plants; they have to 
be transplanted every year, as they cannot be 
left in the same place for several years, as is 
done North. 

Michel's Early and Sucker State are the 
favorite varieties for this market. 

Continue to sow Flower seeds of all sf)ring 
blooming varieties. Plant Hyacinth, Nar- 
cissus, Ranunculus, Anemones, Tulip and 
Lily bulbs. 



NOVEMBER. 



During this month continue to sow all va- 
rieties of Winter vegetables as during the 
previous month. 

Superior Large Late Flat Dutch and Improved 
Drumhead Cabbage sown in this month will 
make tine heads in the Spring, also other late 
and second early varieties. 

Artichokes should be dressed if not done 
already last month. 

Sow Black Eyed Marrowfat and other late 
varieties of Peas; they are not easily affected 
by frost as long as they are small, and during 
this time of the year they will not grow very 
fast. English Windsor Beans may be planted 
yet; they are hardy enough not to be hurt by 
frost. 

Hot-beds should be gotten ready now for 
Cucumbers, manure for same should be looked 
after; it ought not to be over one month old. 

Throw it together in a heap, and when 
heated, fork it over again, so the long and 
short manure will be well mixed. 



The first vegetables generally sown in hot- 
beds, are Cucumbers; it is best to start them 
in two or three inch pots, and when they have 
two rough leaves, transplant them to their 
place; two good plants are sufficient under 
one sash. 

Sow Flower seeds of all kinds in boxes and 
transplant when large enough into open 
ground. 

Plant Hyacinths, Tulips, Narcissus and 
Jonquills in open ground or flower pots for 
forcing. 

To force Hyacinths and other bulbous 
rooted plants in flower pots, use light but 
rich soil, plant in 5 inch pots, so that the top 
of the bulbs are covered about half an inch. 

Give one good watering and bury the pots 
6 inches under the ground, until the bulbs 
are well rooted, which takes from 4 to 5 weeks. 
When well rooted take the pots out of the 
ground and gradually expose to the light, 
when they will soon put out and bloom well. 



DECEMBER. 



During this month not a great deal is planted, 
as the ground is generally occupied by growing 
crops. 

Peas for general crop may be planted, some 
Potatoes could be risked; but on account of 
cold weather during Janaarj'' and February, it 
is very uncertain whether they will succeed or 
not. 



Spinach, Roquette, Radishes, Carrots, Let- 
tuce, Endive and some earlj^ Cabbage may be 
sown. 

Sow early varieties of Cauhflower, such as 
Early Erfurt, Le Norm and, Half Early and 
Extra Early Paris in a frame or a sheltered 
situation in the open ground to be transplanted 
in February. Of Early Cabbage, sow Early and 



k 



80 KICHAED FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 

Large Early York, Oxlieart and Winning- These Tarieties "oill only sell for the first, as 

staclt. the frnit is not as large as the Li%'ingston va- 

Sow Tomatoes for forcing in a cooled off rieties. which come in later. 

hot-bed, the best kinds for that purpose are Prepare gi'ound for Fruit Trees during this 

the Extra Early Dwarf and the Dwarf Cham- i month, and. towards the end begin to plant 

pion. The former is really a good acquisition; ! some. 

it is very productive and of good size, and • Sow Pecans to raise trees from. 

bears the fruit in clusters. ! 



TOBACCO SEEDS. 



Illiportecl Hcivaiia. I imported from one of the principal gi-owers the finest and 

purest strain of Vuelto Abajo. which is considered the best of the Havana varieties. 
Price, 10 cts. i:)ev package — iO cts. per oz., 84.00 'pev lb. 
COiiliecticiit Seed L<eaf. A well-known American variety. 
Price, 10 cts. per package, — 25 cts. per oz., — 82.50 per lb. 



■^ ♦ ^ 



SWEET AND MEDICINAL HERBS. 



Some of these herbs possess cuhnary as well as medicinal properties. Should be found in 
every garden. Ground where they are to be sown should be well prepared and pulverized. 
Some of them have very fine seed, and it is only necessary, after the seed is sown, to press the 
ground with the back of the spade; if covered too deep they cannot come up. Early spring is 
the best time to sow them — some, such as Sage, Rosemary, Lavender and Basil, are best sown 
in a frame and afterwards transplanted into the garden. 

Anise, Pimpinelle Anisum. Lavender. Lavendvia Vera. 

Balm, Melisse Officinalis. Marjoram, sweet. Origanum Mayoram. 

Basil, large and small leaved. Ocynnua Basi- Pot Marigold. Calendula Officinalis. 

Ileum. j Rosemary, JRosemary Officinalis. 

Bene, tSesamum Orientale. j Rue, Bida G^raveolens. 

Borage, Borago Officinalis. Sage. Salvia Officinalis. 

Caraway, Carum Carni. Summer Savory, Scdureja Horiensis. 

Dill, Anethum Oraveolens. Thyme, Thymus Vulgaris. 

Fennel, sweet, Anethum Foeniculum. Wormwood, Ariemisia Absinthium. 



■ ^ ♦ ^ 



GRASS AND FIELD SEEDS. 



I have often been asked what kind of Grass Seed is the best for this latitude, but so far I 
have never been able to answer this question satisfactorily. For hay I do not think there is 
anything better than the Millet. For permanent grass I have almost come to the conclusion 
that none of the grasses used for this purpose North and West ^vill answer. Barley, Rye, Red 
Oats and Rescue Grass will make winter pasturage in this latitude. Different kinds of Clover 
answer very well during spring, but during the hot summer months I have never found any- 
thing to stand and produce, except the Bermuda and Crabgi-ass. which are indigenous to the 
South. 

Of late years the Lespedeza Striata, or Japan Clover, has been sown extensively, a descrip- 
tion of which will be found on page 86. 

The Bermuda, in my opinion, is better suited for pasturage than hay, as it is rather short 
and hard when cured. Having tried Guinea Grass I have come to the conclusion that it vnR 
not answer here, from the fact that it will^ freeze out every year. It ^vill produce a large 
quantity of hay or gi'een fodder, but has to be resown every spring. The seeds that are raised 
here are light, and do not germinate freely. To import seed every year is rather troublesome. 
The Johnson Grass advertised by some as Guinea Grass is not Guinea Grass; it is much coar- 
ser, and can hardly be destroyed after having taken hold of a piece of ground. Some are en- 
thusiastic about Alfalfa or Lucerne; others, whose opinion also ought to be respected, say it 
will not do here. There exists a gieat difference of opinion in regard to which grass seed is the 
most suitable for the South. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



81 



Red Clover. Should be sown either 
duriug fall or early in spring. Six to eight 
pounds to an acre. 

While Dutch Clover. A grass sown 
for pasturage at the rate of four to six poiinds 
to the acre. Should be sown in fall and early 
spring. 

Crimson Clover. An annual matur- 
ing earlier than the red, of which it is perhaps 
a variety. For description see page 87. 

Alfalfa or Chili Clover, or 
French Lucerne. This variety does 
well here, but the ground has to be well pre- 
pared and deeply plowed. It will not do in 
low wet ground. Should be sown in the fall 
of the year, or January and February; eight 
to ten pounds per acre. This being of special 
value I refer to the letter written by E. M. 
Hudson on the subject. (Seepage 88.) 

Kentucky Blue Orass. (Extra 
Cleaned. ) Should be sown in dry soil. Two 
bushels per acre. See page 83. 

Meadovi^ Fescue. Festuca pratensis. 
As a pasturage grass I consider this one of the 
most valuable. It is not affected by dry 
weather, as its roots penetrate the earth 12 to 
15 inches; it is much relished by all kinds of 
stock on account of its long and tender leaves. 
It yields a very superior hay when cured. It 
has been grown very little in this country and 
is deserving of much more attention. Sow in 
spring or fall. Two bushels to the acre. In 
some sections it is called Eandall Grass. This 
should not be confounded with the English 
Rye Grass, offered by some dealers as the 
same variety. 

Orchard Grass. This is one of the 
best grasses for pasturing. It grows quickly, 
much more so than the Blue Grass. Can be 
sown either in fall or spring. Sow one to one 
and a half bushels per acre. (See extract from 
"Farmers' Book of Grasses.") 

Rescue Grass. A forage plant from 
Australia. It groM's during winter. Sow the 



seed in the fall of the year, but not before the 
weather gets cool, as it will not sprout so long 
as the ground is warm. Sow 1 i bushels seed 
to the acre. 

Hung-arian Grass. This is a valuable 
annual forage plant, and good to luake hay. 
Sow three pecks to the acre. It should be cut 
when in bloom. 

German Millet. Of all the Millets 
this is the best. It makes good hay, and pro- 




Alfalfa or Lueorue Clover. 



:^5s^ 





Red Clover. 



Meadow Fescue Grass. 



White Dutch Clover. 



6 



82 



RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



duces heavily. Three pecks sown to the acre 
broad-cast secures a good stand. Can be sown 
from April till June, but the former month is 
the best time. Should be cut when in bloom. 

Kye. Is sown during the fall months as 
late as December, for forage; and for pastur- 
age, during ^vinter and spring. 

Barley. Can be sown fall and winter, 
but requires strong, good soil. Used here for 
forage during its green state. 

Texas Ked Rust Proof Oats. 

It is only a few years since these Oats have 
come into general cultivation. They are very 
valuable, and will save a great deal of corn on 
a farm. The seed of this varietv has a red- 



dish cast, a peculiar long beard, and is very 
heavy. It is the only kind which will not 
rust in the Southern climate. They can be 
sown as early as October, but should be 
pastured down as soon as they commence to 
j oint, till February, "When the ground is low, 
or the season wet, this cannot well be done 
without destroying the whole crop. During 
Januarj" and February is the proper time, if 
no pasturing can be done. One to one and a 
half bushels per acre is sufficient. These oats 
have a tendency to stool, and therefore do not 
require as much per acre as common oats. 
Those who have not already tried this variety 
should do so. 



The following extracts have been taken by permission from the author. Dr. D. L. Phares, 
from his book, "Farmers' Book of Grasses." It is the most valuable work of the kind ever 
published in the South, and should be in the hands of every one who takes an interest in the 
cultivation of grasses. 

Copies for sale at publisher's i3rice. Paper covers, 25 cents; Cloth, 35 cents; postage paid. 

ORCHARD CRASS. 

(Dadylis Glomeraia. ) 

Of all the grasses this is one of the most 
widely diffused, growing in Africa, Asia and 
every country in Europe and all our States. 
It is more highly esteemed and commended 
than any other grass, by a large number of 
farmers in most countries — a most decided 
proof of its gTeat value and wonderful ad- 
aptation to many soils, climates and treat- 
ments. Yet, strange to say, though growing 
in England for many centuries it was not 
appreciated in that country till carried 
there from Yirginia in 1764. But, as in 
the case of Timothy, soon after its intro- 
duction from America, it came into high 
favor among farmers, and still retains its 
hold on their estimation as a grazing and 
hay crop. 

Nor is this strange when its many ad- 
vantages and points of excellence are con- 
sidered. It will grow well on any soil 
containing sutficient clay and not holding 
too much water. If the land be too tena- 
cious, drainage will remedy the soil; if 
worn out, a top dressing of stable manure 
will give it a good send-off, and it will 
furnish several good mowings the first year. 
It grows well between 29 ^ and 48 <^ lati- 
tude. It may be moved from two to four 
times a year, according to the latitude, 
season and treatment; yielding from one 
to three tons of excellent hay per acre on 
poor to medium land. In gi-azing and as 
hay, most animals select it in preference 
among mixtures in other grasses. In lower 
latitudes it furnishes good winter grazing, 
as well as for spring, summer and fall. 
After grazing, or mowing, few gi-asses grow 
so rapidly (^three to six inches per week), 
and are so soon ready again for tooth or 
blade. It is easily cured and handled. It 
is readilv seeded and catches with certainty. 
Orchard Grass. Its long, deeply penetrating fibrous roots 




FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



83 



enable it to sustain itself and grow vigorously 
during droiigbts that dry up other grasses, ex- 
cept tall oat grass, which has similar roots and 
characteristics. It grows well in open lands and 
in forests of large trees, the underbrush being 
all cleared off. I have had it grown luxuriantly 
even in beech woods, where the roots are super- 
ficial, in the crotches of roots and close to the 
trunks of trees. The hay is of high quality, 






and the young grass contains a larger per 
centage of nutritive digestible matter than 
any other grass. It thrives well without any 
renewal on the same ground for thirty-five, 
nay forty years; how much longer, I am not 
able to say. It is easily exterminated when 
the land is desired for other crops. Is there 
any other grass for which so much can be 
said ? 

RED TOP CRASS, 

(Agrosls Vulgaris.) 
This is the best grass of England, the 
herd grass of the Southern States; not in 
honor of any man, but probably, because 
so well adajjted to the herd. It is called 
also Fine Top, Burden's and Borden's 
Grass. Varying greatly in character, ac- 
cording to soil, location, climate and 
culture, some botanists have styled it A. 
Folymorpha. It grows two to three ft. high, 
and I have mown it when four feet high. 
It grows well on hill tops and sides, in 
ditches, gullies and marshes, but delights 
in moist bottom land. It is not injured 
by overflows, though somewhat prolonged. 
In marshy land it produces a very dense, 
strong network of roots capable of sus- 
taining the weight of men and animals 
walking over it. 

It furnishes considerable grazing during 
warm "spells" in winter, and in spring 
and summer an abundant supply of nu- 
trition. It has a tendency, being very 
hardy, to increase in density of growth and 
extent of surface, and will continue in- 
definitely, though easily subdued by the 
plow. 

Cut before maturing seed, it makes a 
good hay and large quantity. It seems to 
grow taller in the Southern States than it 
does further North, and to make more and better hay and grazing. Bed Top and Timothy, 
being adapted to the same soil and maturing at the same time, do well together and produce 
an excellent hay. But the Bed Top will finally root out Timothy, and if pastured much it will 
do so sooner. 

Sow about two bushels (28 lbs.), per acre, if alone, in September, October, February, or 
March; if with Timothy for hay, from 6 to ten pounds; if with other grasses for pasture, 3 to 
5 pounds. It is an excellent pasture grass, and will grow almost on any kind of soil. 

KENTUCKY BLUE CRASS. 

(Poa Pratensis. ) 




Red Top Grass. 



I 



This is also called smooth meadow grass, 
spear grass, and green grass, all three very 
appropriate characteristic names. But Blue 
is a misnomer for this grass. It is not blue, 
but green as grass, and the greenest of grasses. 
The P. Compressa, flat-stalked meadow grass, 
wire grass, blue grass is blue, 'the true blue' 
grass from which the genus received its trivial 
name. 

Kentucky blue grass, known also in the 
Eastern States as June grass, although esteem- 
ed in some parts of America as the best of all 
pasture grasses, seems not to be considered 
very valuable among English farmers except 
in mixtures. It is certainly a yerj desirable 
pasture grass however. Its very narrow 



leaves, two or more feet long, are in such pro- 
fusion and cover the ground to such depth 
with their luxuriant growth, that a mere des- 
cription could give no one an adequate idea of 
its beauty, quantity and value; that is on rich 
land. On poor, sandy land, it degenerates 
sadly, as do other things uncongenial!}' located. 
Perennial, and bearing cold and drought 
well, it furnishes grazing a large part of the 
year. It is specially valuable as a winter and 
spring grass for the South. To secure the best 
winter results, it should be allowed a good 
growth in early fall, so that the end of the 
leaves, being killed by the frost, afford an 
ample covering for the under-part which con- 
tinue to grow all winter, and afford a good bite 



84 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



whenever required by sheep, cattle, hogs and 
horses. In prolonged summer drought it 
dries completely, so that, if fired, it would 
burn 0&. clean. But this occurs in Kentucky, 
where indeed it has seemed without fire, to 
disappear utterlj-; yet, when rain came, the 
bright green spears promptly recarpeted the 
earth. 

With its underground stems and many roots, 
it sustains the heat and 
drought of the Southern 
States as well as those of 
Kentucky, where indeed 
it is subjected to severer 
trials of this kind than 
in the more Southern 
States. In fact, it bears 
the vicissitudes of our 
climate about as well as 
Bermuda grass, and is 
nearly as nutritious. 

Blue grass grows well 

on hill tops, or bottom 

land if not too wet and 

It may be 




too poor. 

sown any 

September 

preferable 



time from 

to April, 

perhaps in 



Kentucky Blue Grasj 



the latter half of Febru- 
ary, or early in March. 
The best catch I ever had was sown the 20th 
of March, on unbroken land, from which 



trash, leaves, etc., had just been burned. 
The surface of the land should be cleaned of 
trash of all kinds, smooth, even; and if re- 
cently plowed and harrowed, it should be 
rolled also. The last proceeding is for com- 
pacting the surface in order to prevent the 
seed from sinking too deep in the ground. 
Without harrowing or brushing in, many of 
them get in too deep to come up, even when 
the surface of the land has had the roller over 
it. The first rain after seeding will put them 
in deep enough, as the seeds are \evj minute, 
and the spears of grass small as fine needles, 
and therefore unable to get out from under 
heavy cover. These spears are so small as to 
be invisible, except to close examination; and 
in higher latitudes this condition continues 
through the first year. Thus, some who have 
sown the blue grass seed, seeing the first year 
no grass, imagine they have been cheated, 
plant some other crop, and probably lose what 
close inspection would have shown to be a good 
catch. This, however, is not apt to occur in 
the Southern tier of States, as the growth here 
is more rapid. The sowing mentioned above 
made on the 20th of March, came up prompt- 
ly, and in three months the grass was from six 
to ten inches high. One year here gives a 
finer growth and show than two in Kentucky, 
and any other State so far North. 

Sown alone, 20 to 26 pounds, that is 2 bushels, 
should be used; in mixtures, 4 to 6 pounds. 



ENGLISH OR 



PERE^SNiAL 

(Lolium Ferenne. J 



RYE CRASS. 




English Rye Grass. 



This is the 
first grass culti- 
vated in Eng- 
land over two 
centuries ago, 
and at a still 
more rem ote 
p e r i o d in 
France. It was 
long more 
widely known 
and cultivated 
than any other 
grass, became 
adapted to a 
great variety of 
soils and con- 
ditions, and a 



vast number (seventy or more) of varieties 
produced, some of which were greatly im- 
proved while others were inferior and became 
annuals. Introduced into the United States 
in the first quarter of the current century, it 
has never become very popular, although 



shown by the subjoined analysis of Way not 
to be deficient in nutritive matter. In 100 
parts of the dried grass cut in bloom were 
albuminoids 11.85, fatty matter 3.17, heat- 
producing principles 42,24, wood fibre 35.20, 
ash 7.54. The more recent analj-sis of Wolrt" 
and Knopp, allowing for water, gives rather 
more nutritive matter than this. 

It grows rapidly, and yields heavy crops of 
seed, makes good grazing, and good hay. But, 
as with all the Eye grasses, to make good hay, 
it must be cut before passing the blossom 
stage, as after that it deteriorates rapidly. 
The roots being short, it does not bear drought 
Avell, and exhausts the soil, dying out in a few 
years. In these respects it is liable to the same 
objections as Timothy. The stem, one to two 
feet high, has four to six purplish joints and 
as many dark green leaves ; the fiexious sjiiked 
panicle bearing the distant spikelets, one in 
each bend. 

It should be sown in August or September, 
at the rate of twenty-five or thirty pounds, or 
one bushel seed per acre. 



TALL MEADOW OAT CRASS. 

( Arrhenatherum Avenaceum. ) 



Evergreen grass in Virginia, and other 
Southern States, and it is the Tall Oat (Avena 
elatior) of Lina^us. It is closely related to the 
common oat, and has a beautiful open panicle, 

"Spikelets two 



leaning slightly to one side 



flowered, and a rudiment of a third, open ; 
lowest flower staminate or sterile, with a long 
bent awn below the middle of the back." — 
(Flint.) 

It is widely naturalized and well adapted to 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



85 




Tall Meadow Oat Grass. 



a great variety of 
soils. On sandy, 
or gravelly soils, it 
succeed.^ admirab- 
ly, growing t\\'o or 
three feet high. On 
rich, dry upland it 
grows from five to 
seven feet high. It 
has an abundance 
of perennial, long 
tibrt)as roots, pene- 
trating deeply in 
the soil, being, 
therefore, less af- 
fected by drought 
or , cold, and en- 
abled to yield a 
large quantity of 
foliage, winter and 
summer. These 

advantages render 
it one of the very 
best grasses for the 
South, both for 
grazing (being ever- 
green) and for hay, 

year. It is 
that can be 



a 



admitting of being cut twice 
probably the best winter grass 
obtained. 

It will make twice as much hay as Timothy, 
and containing a greater quantity of albumi- 
noids and less of heat-producing principles, it 
is better adapted to the uses of the Southern 



farmer, while it exhausts the surface soil less, 
and may be grazed indefinitely, except after 
mowin_,. To make good hay it must be cut 
the instant it blooms, and 'after being cut, 
must not get wet by dew or rain, which 
damages it greatly in (piality and appearance. 

For green soiling, it may l)e cut four or five 
times with favorable seasons. In from six to 
ten days after bl(X)ming, the seeds begin to 
ripen and fall, the upper ones first. It is, 
therefore, a little troublesome to save the 
seed. As soon as those at the top of the 
pinacle ripen sufficiently to begin to drop, 
the heads should be cut off. and dried, when 
the seeds will all thresh out readily and be 
matured. After the seeds are ripe and taken 
off, the long abundant leaves and stems are 
still green, and being mowed make good hay. 

It may be sown in March or April, and 
mowed the same season; but for heavier yield, 
it is better to sow in September or October. 
Along the more southern belt, from the 31 ^ 
parallel southward, it may be sown in 
November and onward till the middle of 
December. Whenever sown it is one of the 
most certain grasses to have a good catch. 
Not less than two bushels (28 pounds) per 
acre should be sown. Like Timothy, on in- 
hospitable soils, the root may sometime be- 
come bulbous. The average annual nutrition 
yielded by this grass in the Southern belt is 
probably twice as great as in Pennsylvania 
and other Northern States. 



BERMUDA CRASS. 

(Oynodon Dadylon.) 



Almost everybody living in this section of 
the country knows this grass; it is planted as 
a Lawn grass, and nothing will stand the sun 
better, or will make a prettier carpet, when 
kept short, than this grass. It is also very 
valuable as a pasture and hay grass. It is 
only lately that I have been able to obtain the 



seed of this grass, which heretofore had to be 
propagated by the roots. Six pounds will sow 
an acre. Should be planted in Spring, but 
can also be sown later. Under the most favor- 
able circumstances it takes from 20 to 25 daj's 
to sprout; requires damp weather and hot sun; 
but when once up it grows very rapidly. 



RESCUE CRASS. 

( Ceratochloa australls or Bromus Schrader'd. ) 

It is an annual winter grass. It varies in the time of starting 
growth. I have seen it ready for mowing the first of October 
and furnish frequent cuttings till April. Again, it may not start 
before January, nor be ready to cut till February. This dej^ends 
upon the moisture ahd depression of temperature. When once 
started, its growth, after the successive cuttings or grazings, is 
very rapid. It is tender, very sweet, and stock eat it greedily. 
It makes also a good hay. It produces an immense quantity 
of leaves. On loose soil some of it may be pulled out by 
animals grazing it._ I have seen it bloom as early as November 
when the season had favored it. and no grazing or cutting were 
permitted. Oftener it makes little start before January. But 
Avhether late or early starting, it may be grazed or mowed fre- 
quently, until xlpril, it still will mature seed. It has become 
naturalized in limited portions of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, 
Alabama and perhaps other States. It is a very pretty grass in 
all its stages; and especially so when the culms, two or three 




Rescue Grass. 



86 



RICHAED FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



feet higli, are gracefully bending the weight 
of the cliffuse panicle with its many pedicelled 
flattened spikelets, each an inch or more long 
and with twelve to sixteen flowers. 



I would not, however, advise sowing this 
grass on poor land with the expectation of 
getting a remunerative return. It tillers 
abundantly under favorable conditions. 



JAPAN CLOVER. 

(Lespedeza Striata.) 



There is now so much enquiry about this 
plant, so much confusion, lack of knowledge 
and confounding with or mistaking for it an- 
other worthless species, and also the same 
errors in regard to a small genuine clover, that 
it is deemed proper to give some correct in- 
formation on the subject. 

HISTOBY. 

To botanists this plant has been known for 
many generations in its native habitat in China 
and other eastern parts of Asia. Finding its 
way to Japan it encountered congenial climate 
and soil, and rapidly spread over the entire 
country occupying all waste places, which it 
has continued to possess and improve for 
much more than a century. Here, as on the 
continent it was of dwarfish habit and received 
a name indicative of the fact. 

Finally a few seeds, arriving in the United 
States, germinated, contested a few feet of 
soil with other native and exotic plants that 
had long pre-occupied the land. 

It gained strength and increased in jdeld of 
seed till becoming somewhat abundant, it 
commenced its westward invasion, simultane- 
ously extending its conquests northward and 
southward, firmly holding all conquered ter- 
ritory. Since 1870 its strides westward have 
been immense. It now extends from the 
Atlantic seaboard across the Mississippi, and 
its out-posts are pushed far towards the 
western border of Texas. 

Denuded, soil-less hill tops, sandy plains, 
gravelly slopes, bottoms and banks of washes 
and gullies, pine thickets, open woods, fields, 
dry and damp soils, all seem as if specially 
created for its home. It seizes upon all with 
equal facility. 

It maintains its dwarfish habit on sands, 
gravels and other spots too poor to produce 
any other vegetation, densely covering the 
surface with its green robe and affording de- 
lighted live stock with delicious nutritious 
grazing for four to eight months of the year. 
But on richer soils it doffs the dwarf and dons 
the tree-style, justifying the American name 
of "bush-clover," sending its long tap root 
deep down in the subsoil and its stem two to 
three feet up into the light and air, with its 
many branches thickly set with leaves, in- 
viting tooth and blade. 

It attains here on rich or medium soil, 
protected from live stock, a magnitude that 
could not have been imagined by one seeing 
it in its far eastern home. It takes possession 
not only of unoccupied land and pine thickets, 
but grows among sedges, grasses, briers and 
weeds, completely eradicating many species 
of noxious grasses and weeds. It subdues 
even broom grass and holds equal contest with 



Bermuda grass; in some localities one yielding, 
in other localitiei the other succumbing, while 
in other spots both maintain equal possession; 
or one year one may seem to rule, and the 
next year the other. 

VAX,UE. 

On sands, gravels, or denuded clay hill tops 
no other plants known to me is so valuable for 
grazing. Taking a succession of ten years, 
the same assertion would not be far out of the 
way for rich lands while few forage plants on 
these would yield so much or so valuable hay. 

The analysis of red clover gives 16 per cent, 
albuminoids and 41 carbohydrates. The average 
of two analyses of Japan clover gives 15.85 
albuminoids and 56 carbohydrates, placing it 
above red clover in nutritive value. It is 

SUPEEIOK TO OTHER FORAGE PLANTS 

in several important particulars not generally 
observed by the careless stock-man, 1. The 
growing plant contains less moisture than 
any other very valuable forage plant ^vith 
perhaps a single exception. Hence we never 
hear of animals having hoven or bloat or 
scours from eating this plant as when they 
have free access to red clover, peas and many 
grasses. 2, We have never yet found on the 
Japan Clover any fungous growths which are 
so common on other plants as to cause many 
deaths anniially among animals grazing on 
them or fed with the hay. 3. Heavy grazing 
for a few weeks destroys the clovers, lucerne 
and most of the grasses, while this plant may 
be grazed however closely, whether the season 
be wet or prolonged drouth prevail, without 
damage. 4. There is less difficulty of ob- 




Japan Clover. 



FOE THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



87 



taining a catch with this plant than most 
others. The seed may be scattered on bare, 
poor, barren ground, rich soil, among weeds 
and dead grass, or in March on small grain 
sown the previous autumn or winter and a 
catch will be obtained. 5. The grain being 
harvested when ripe does not injure the Les- 
pedeza; which is ready for the mower through 
September and October. 6. It is more easily 
cured than the clovers, pea vines and many 
grasses. 7. It does not lose the foliage in 
curing as do clovers, peas and some other 
plants. 8. It furnishes good grazing from 
May, some years last of March till killed by 
frost in October or November. 

PEODUCT OF HAY. 

On medium to good land it ranges from one 
to three tons per acre; and this may be ob- 
tained after having during |;he summer har- 
vested from the same land a good crop of 
grain and straw. 

QUALITY. 

Some of our farmers who have been mowing 
Lespedeza striata for five to ten years, regard 
it as the soundest, best, most wholesome and 
palatable hay they ever used. These mowings 
have ranged from two to three hundred tons 
on single farms in one season. Yet no com- 
plaint as to quality, or rehsh of animals for it, 
or as to its nutritive value and good effect on 
the stock has ever reached us. Those who 
have used it longest and in largest quantities 
and kept animals — cattle, sheep, horses and 
mules — in best condition commend it most. 
We have now before us a beautiful sample of 
this hay from Louisiana, being from a crop of 
perhaps 300 tons mowed last autumn. 

SEEDING. 

A measured half bushel of seed per acre may 
be sown broad-cast the first week in March 
south of parallel 32 "^ of latitude, a few days 
later as we proceed northward for each degree 
or two. Sown in the Fall or Winter it springs 
up, but freezes often throw it out and destroy 
it. As already stated, it germinates and grows 
well on land in any condition, if the surface 
is not so loose as to let the seed sink too deep. 
When land has been prepared for or sown in 



gi-ain, the winter rains put it in about the best 
condition for growing this plant for heavy 
crops of hay. 

All our remarks on this plant, as found in 
our Southern States, are based on what we 
have seen and learned of it in a belt Iving 
between 304 ^ and 34° of latitude. 

The only 

COMPLETE PKOOF 

of the value of a forage plant is found in the 
concurrence of chemical analysis and the ob- 
servation and experience of the stockman. 
When the relish of an animal for the forage is 
keen, the health preserved and improved, 
growth promoted, a maximum quantity of 
excellent beef or mutton or pork, and, if 
superior milk and butter are obtained, we cer- 
tainly have an admirable food plant. The 
judgment of the cow, the convictions of the 
farmer arising from his experiences indepen- 
dent of, and indeed in utter ignorance of any 
chemical analysis, confirming the decisions of 
the chemist, gives us the best of all evidences 
of the value ©f forage. And all these we have 
in this case. Japan clover is also a great 

AMELIOKATOE AND lEETUilZEK. 

Its abundant long tap-roots decaying render 
the soil porous and leave in it much nitro- 
genous material and humus. It releases and 
brings up from the subsoil valuable plant 
food ; the ashes containing nearly 40 per cent, 
potash, 29.60 oxide lime, 7.82 sulphuric acid, 
7.54 phosphoric acid — all most valuable ele- 
ments in plant life and growth. Soils are thus 
renovated, slopes prevented from washing, 
gulhes filled, moisture solicited and retained, 
atmospheric fertilizers gathered and garnered; 
bald, barren wastes covered with living green 
to fill the stomach, delight the eye and cheer 
the heart. 

It should have been stated that this plant 
has eradicated over large areas the much 
detested helenium or bitter weed, which so 
often damages the flavor of the milk of cows 
eating it while grazing. It is believed that it 
exterminates also two or three plants that 
are fatally poisonous to cattle and horses. 

For price see price list. 



BURR CLOVER. 



(Medicago 

This variety of clover was brought from 
Chili to California, and thence to the States, 
under the name of California Clover. It is 
often taken for Lucerne, which name is wrong- 
ly applied. The Burr Clover has only two or 
three yellow blossoms in each cluster, while 
Lucerne has many blue blossoms in an elon- 
gated head. It furnishes good grazing from 



Maculata. ) 

February till April or May. It is good for 
grazing and hay. As there is no way for re- 
moving the seeds from the pods of spotted 
medic, it is necessary to sow the burr like 
pods, say one half bushel per acre. The 
planting should be done early in Fall, so the 
pods may have time to rot and release the 
seeds. Should be covered very lightly. 



Although this annual, which belongs to a 
warm climate, has not been tried in Louisiana 
to any extent, I should recommend to do so. 
It is, as by the reports of Experiment Stations 
of North Carolina and other States, an excel- 



CRiMSON CLOVER. 

( Trifolium Incarnatum. J 

lent clover, jaroductive for one or two mow- 
ings, which should be done when young yet, 
as it becomes hard and woody if allowed to 
mature. 

As it is a native of the southern part of 



88 



RICHARD FROTSCHER's ALMANAC A'SB GARDEN MANUAL 



Europe and successfiillv cultivated in the 
South of France and GermanT, it should be 
well adapted to our climate and therefore be 
worth cultivating. I would advise to give it 
a trial. 

In the Southern States Crimson Clover 



should be sown in the months of October or 
November, however it can be sown as late as 
January and February with success, and will 
produce a fine crop yet. 

It will take from 8 to 10 pounds to sow an 
acre. 



LETTER ON "ALFALFA.' 



Having received ;many inquiries on the culture of Alfalfa, I reprint the follo^^ing letter 
written by E. M. HrnsoN, Esq., a close observer on the subject, to give information thereon. 

Villa Fkiedheim. 



3Ir. E. Fkotschek, Xevr Orleans, La. : 

Dear Sir: — Your letter of the 3rd inst. has 
just reached me, and I cheerfully comply with 
your request to give you the results of my ex- 
peiiments with Lucerne or Alfalfa, and my 
opinion of it as a forage plant for the South. 

I jDreface my statement with the observation 
that my exj^eiiments have been conducted on 
a naturally poor, piney woods soil (which 
would be classed as a sandy soil, varying in 
depth from six inches to one foot). But I have 
good red clay subsoil, which enables the soil 
to retain the fertilizers appHed to it, thus ren- 
dering it susceptible of permanent enriching. 

Three years since, when my attention was 
first directed to Alfalfa, I sought the advice of 
the editor of the Journal of Progress, Professor 
SteUe, who informed me that, after attempt- 
ing for several years to cultivate it, he had de- 
sisted. He stated that the plant, at Citronelle, 
in this count}^, died, out every summer, not 
being able to\vithstand the hot suns of our 
climate. Discouraged, but not dismayed, I 
determined to test the matter on a small scale 
at first. Having procured some seeds in March, 
1876, I planted them on a border in my gar- 
den, and gave neither manure nor work that 
season. The early summer here that year was 
very dry; there was no rain whatever from the 
first of June to the 23d of July, and from the 
2d of August to the loth of November not a 
drop of rain fell on my place. Yet, during 
aU this time, my Alfalfa remained fresh, 
bloomed, and was cut two or three times. On 
the 1st of November I dug some of it to exam- 
ine the habit of root gi-owth, and to my aston- 
ishment found it necessary to go twenty-two 
inches belo-s\- the surface to reach anything 
like the end of the tap roots. At once it was 
apparent that the plant was, by its very habit 
of growth, adapted to hot and dry climates. 
It is indeed a "child of the sun. " 

Encouraged by this experiment, in which I 
purposely refrained from giving the Alfalfa 
any care bevond cutting it occasionallv. last 
year i proceeded on a larger scale, planting 
both spiing and fall, as I have done again this 
year, to ascertain the best season for putting 
in the seed. ]My experience teaches that there 
is no preference to be given to spring sowings 
over those of autiimn, provided only, there be 
enough moisture in the soil to make the seed 
germinate, which they do more. quickly and 
more surely than the best turnips. Two win- 
ters h-ive proved to^ie that the Alfalfa remains 



or soiling. Used 
no circumstances 
am able to give 
fuUv four weeks 



Mobile County, Ala., September 7th, 187S. 
green throughout the ^^-inter in this latitude, 
twenty-five miles north of Mobile, and at an 
altitude of 400 feet above tide-water. There- 
fore I should prefer fall sowing, which will 
give the first cutting from the 1st of March 
to the 1st of April following. This season my 
first cutting was made on the 1st of April; and 
I have cut it since regularly every four or six 
weeks, according to the weather, to cure for 
hay. Meanwhile a portion has been cut al- 
most dailv for feeding green, 
in the latter way {for under 
must it ever be pastured), I 
my stock fresh, gi'een food, 
before the native wild grasses commence to 
put out. I deem it best to cut the day before 
T^'hat is fed green, in order to let it become 
thoroughly wilted before using. After a large 
number of experiments T\-ith horses, mules, 
cattle and swine, I can aver that in no in- 
stance, from March to November, have I 
found a case when any of these animals would 
not give the preference to Alfalfa over every 
kind of grass (also soiled) known in this re- 
gion. And while Alfalfa makes a sweet and 
nutritious hay eagerly eaten by all kinds of 
stock, it is as a forage plant for soiling, which 
is available for at least nine months in the 
year, that I esteem it so highly. The hay is 
easily cin-ed, if that which is cut in the fore- 
noon is thrown into small cocks at noon, then 
spread out after the dew is ott" next morning, 
sunned for an hour, and at once hauled into 
the barn. By this method the leaves do not 
fall off, which is sure to be the case if the 
Alfalfa is exposed to a day or two of hot sun- 
shine. 

It has been my habit to precede the Alfalfa 
with a clean crop — usually Euta Bagas — after 
which I sow clay peas, to be tiirned in about 
the last of July. About the middle of Sep- 
tember or later I have the land plowed, the 
turn-plow being followed by a deep subsoil- 
plow or scooter. After this the land is fertil- 
ized and harrowed until it is thoroughly 
pulverized and all lumps broken up. The 
fertilizers employed by me are 500 lbs. fine 
bone-dust (phosphate of lime) and 1000 lbs. 
cotton seed hull ashes per acre. These ashes 
are very rich in potash and phosphates, con- 
taining nearly 45 -^ex cent, of the phosphate 
of lime — the two articles best adapted to the 
wants of this plant. I sow all my .AlfaKa with 
the Matthews' Seed Drill, in rows 10 inches 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



89 



apart. Broad-CMst would be preferable, if the 
land was perfectly free from grass and weeds, 
but it takes several years of clean culture to 
put tlie land in this condition; sowing in drills 
is practically the best. No seed sower known 
to nie can be compared with the Matthews' 
Seed Drill. Its work is evenly and regularly 
done, and with a rapidity that 'is astonishing-; 
for it opens the drill to any desired depth ; 
drops the seed, covers and rolls them, and 
marks the line for the next drill at one opera- 
tion. It is simple and durable in its structure, 
and is the greatest labor-saving machine of its 
kind ever devised for hand work. 

When my Alfalfa is about three inches' high, 
I work it with the Matthews' Hand Cultivator. 
Pirst, the front tooth of the cultivator is taken 
out, by which means the row is straddled and 
all the grass cut out close to the plant; then 
the front tooth being replaced, the cultivator 
is passed between the rows, completely clean- 
ing the middles of all foul growth. As often 
as required to keep down grass, until the Al- 
falfa is large enough to cut, the Matthews' 
Hand Cultivator is passed between the rows. 

Alfalfa requires three years to reach per- 
fection, but even the tirs^t year the yield is 
larger than most forage plants; and after the 
second it is enormous. The land must, how- 
ever, be made rich at first; a top-dressing every 
three years is all that will thereafter be re- 
quired. The seed must be very lightly cov- 
ered, and should be rolled, or brushed in, if 
not sowed with Matthews' Seed Sower. 

Whenever the plant is in bloom it must be 
cut ; for if the seed be left to mature, the stems 
become hard and woody. Also whenever it 
turns yellow, no matter at what age, it must 
be cut or mowed; for the yellow color shows 



the presence of some disease, or the work of 
some insect, both of which seem to be re- 
medied hj mowing promptly. My experience 
leads me to the conclusion that fully live tons 
of cured hay per acre may be counted on if 
proper attention be given to deep plowing, 
sub-soiling, fertilizing and cleanliness of the 
soil. These things are indispensable, and 
without them no one need attempt to cultivate 
Alfalfa. 

In conclusion, I will remark that I have 
tried the Lucerne seed imported by you from 
France, side by side with the Alfalfa seed sent 
me by Trumbull & Co. , of San Francisco, and 
I can not see the slightest ditference in ap- 
pearance, character,' quantitj^ or quality of 
yield or hardiness. They are identical; both 
have germinated equally well, that is to say, 
perfectly. 

In closing, I can not do better than refer 
you to the little treatise of Mr. C. W. Howard, 
entitled: "A Manual of the Grasses and For- 
age Plants at the South." Mr. Howard, among 
the very first to cultivate Lucerne in the 
South, gives it the j)reference over all other 
forage plants whatever. Mj experience con- 
firms all that Mr. Howard claims for it. Cer- 
tainly, a plant that lasts a generation is worth}' 
of the bestowal of some time, patience and 
money to realize what a treasure they can 
secure for themselves. I confidently believe 
that in years from this date the Alfalfa will 
be generall}' cultivated throughout the entire 
South. 

I am respectfully yours, 

E. M. HUDSON, 

Counsellor at Law, 
20 Carondelet Street, New Orleans. 



LETTER ON THE VALUE OF THE RYE CROP. 



The following letter is from a clipping of the Soidherii 
Starkville, Miss., October 15, 1892. 



Stockman and Fanner, published at 



Value of the Eye Crop. — The letter below 
was written to Mr. Eichard Frotscher, of New 
Orleans, the well known seeds man, by Mr. H. 
AVilkinson, manager of Poplar Grove Planta- 
tion, Port Allen, E. Baton Eouge Parish, La. 

My Dear Sir: — In reply to your inquiry as 
to our success with Eye during the past five 
years, I would say, that we are very much 
pleased with it. Its great value for a winter 
l^asturage cannot be too highly commended, 
and we believe it would be much more ex- 
tensively planted, were the benefits to be 
derived from a winter pasture more generally 
considered. Failures to get a good stand of 
this grain are frequently reported, but if a 
thorough investigation could be made as to 
the cause of these failures, we believe that 
want of proper preparation of the land would 
be the prime reason. We have never failed 
to get a full stand from Ij bushels to the 
acre, planted at time between the 10th of 
September and 20th October, and we believe 
could be successfully planted later, but would 



not be grown enough to turn stock on at the 
time our native grasses begin to drj^ up, which 
in this latitude is usually about November 
15th. Its germination was much delayed by 
the extreme drought of last fall (1891), but 
after the first shower, near the end of October, 
it sprung up uniformly, and at the end of 
November it was ready for pasturage. 

If the date for planting can be fixed, we 
would advise that plowing the land be deferred 
until that time, October 20th,. as during the 
long spell of dry weather we are apt to have 
during the fall, freshly plowed land is apt to 
bake rapidly and become verj^ cloddj". Every- 
thing ready, we would advise that the land 
be deeply plowed, harrowed at once, and the 
sower or seeder immediately follow the har- 
row. The covering should follow at once for 
two reasons: 1st, to prevent the seed from 
being picked u}' by birds, and, 2nd, to get 
them in moist land. The covering should not 
be effected with an ordinary harrow, but 
should be done with a drag made of two 



90 



RICHARD FROTSCHERS ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



boards fitted to two or more cross pieces in 
the reverse position of weatlier boards on a 
Louse. This inexpensive implement di-agged 
over the land crushes small clods, covers the 
seed sufficiently, and levels the ground very 
uniformly, giving it good sui-face di'ainage, 
and preventing the vrashing away of seed by 
small trenches or gulleys. 

"V^'e have paid little attention to any of the 
spring or summer gi'asses. as our native Ber- 
muda, Crab Grass, ^'hite Clover and Pea 
vines afford good summer forage and pastur- 
age. Nothing that vre have tried has been as 
-satisfactory as the Eye for winter pasturage, 
and we will not plant anything else for that 
pm-pose. Any planter who has from 25 to 100 
mules to feed will find their condition from 
December 1st to April 1st much improved by 



a few hours grazing each week on a Eye patch 

fi-om 5 to 2U acres. 

The Butter plate both in the fullness and 
color of its contents offers the highest testi- 
monials by its appearance to those whose 
lands and means limit them to an area not 
measured by acres. 

"We cannot speak of the relative merits of 
Northern and Southern gi'own seed, as we 
have not used any excepting those supplied 
by you, and we do not know where they came 
from. Confident that they were the best, we 
have planted every year with uniformly good 
results. Anv further information we can give 
on this subject will always be at youi' disposal. 
With kindest regards and wishes for a prosper- 
ous business season, followed by a bountiful 
harvest to your patrons. H. WILKINSON. 



DESCRIPTIVE LIST 

OF THE DIFFERENT VARIETIES OF THE SORGHUM FAMILY 

SUITABLE FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 

possible, in drills about two to three feet 
apart; three to foui' quarts per acre. It makes 
excellent gi'een fodder. 

As a forage plant for early cutting, to be fed 
to stock, 1 do not think that anything is equal 
to the Amber Sorghum, such as I have been 
selling for years, imported from Kansas. After 
several cuttings, the branching varieties of 
Sorghum, also called Millo Maize, may be 
preferable, but more so for seed than forage. 
— The Teosinte will give more fodder than 
any of the Sorghums. Some varieties not 
before described and rather new here are the 
following: 

Yellow Millo Maize, or Yellow Branching 
Dhouro. gi'ows same as the T^Tiite Branching 
kind. The only difference exists in the size 
of the seed, which is twice the size of the 
white variety. It is said to be somewhat 
earlier; seeds planted in April will lipen seed 
in Julv. On account of its branching habit 
this grain should be planted in four or five 
foot rows, and two to three feet in the drill, 
according to the strength of the land, two 
plants in a hill. The cultivation is like corn. 

Price, loc. per lb.; postage extra: 8c. per 
lb. by mail — 15 lbs., SI. 50 by Express or 
Steamer. 




Amber Sorghum. 



Sorghum is planted for feeding stock during 
the spring and eaiiy summer. For this pur- 
pose it should be sown as early in spring as 

KAFFIR CORN. 

Thisisa variety of Sorghum, non-sacchaiine, 
and distinctly diffeiing in habit of growth 
and other characteristics from all others of 
that class. The plant is low. stocks perfectly 
erect, the foliage is wide, alternating closely 
on either side of the stalks. 

It does not stool from the root, but branches 
from the top joints, producing from two to 
four heads of grain fi'om each stalk. The 
heads are long. naiTow and perfectly erect, 
well filled with white grain, which at maturity 



is shghtly flecked with red or reddish brown 
spots. Weight, 60 lbs. per bushel. 

The average height of growth on good 
strong land, 05 to 6 feet; on thin land, ih to 
feet. The stalk is stout, never blo^vn about 
by winds, never tangles, and is ahvays man- 
ageable, easily handled. A boy can gather 
the grain heads or the fodder. The seed heads 
grow from 10 to 12 inches in length, and pro- 
duct of grain on good land easily reaches 50 
to 60 bushels per acre. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



91 



It has the quality common to many Sorg- 
hums of resisting drought. If the growth is 
checked by want of moisture, the plant waits 
for rain, and then at once resumes the pro- 
cesses, and in the most disastrous seasons has 
not failed so far to make its crop. On very 
thin and worn lands, it yields paying crops 
of grain and forage, even in dry seasons in 
which corn has utterly failed on the same 
lands. 

The whole stalk, as well as the blades, cures 
into excellent fodder, and in all stages of its 
growth is available for green feed, cattle, mules 
and horses being equally fond of it, and its 
quality is not surpassed by any other known 
variety. If cut down to the ground two or 
more shoots spring from the root, and the 



growth is thus maintained until checked by 
frost. 

The Kaffir Corn may be planted in the latter 
part of March, or early in April. It bears 
earlier planting than other Millets or Sorg- 
hums. It should be put in rows not over 
three feet apart, even on best land, and it 
bears thicker planting than any other variety 
of Sorghum ; should be massed in the drill on 
good land, for either green or forage pi^rposes, 
and also on thin land, if forage mainly is. 
desired. No plant can equal it for quality 
and quantity of grain and forage on thin 
lands. Use 3 to 5 lbs. of seed per acre. Price 
of seed, 10c. per lb. ; postage extra, 8c. per lb. 
by mail; lots of 10 lbs. for 75c. 



TEOSINTE. 

{Rearm luxurians.) 



This is a forage plant from Central America. 
It resembles Indian Corn in aspect and vege- 
tation, but produces a great number of shoots 
3 to 4 yards high; it is perennial, but only in 
such situations where the thermometer does 
not fall below freezing point. Cultivated as 
an annual, it will yield a most abundant crop 
of excellent green fodder. 

Considering the Teosinte a superior forage 
plant, the following extract of a letter from 
Mr. Charles Debremond, of Thibodeaux, La., 
will give additional light on the cultivation of 
same. — In describing his experience with Teo- 
sinte, he advises planting the seed in February, 
so as to have the plants up early in March, as 



it takes some 14 or 20 days for the seed to 
germinate. He prefers planting in rowa, as 
giving a heavier crop than when in hills, and 
as its growth during the first month is very 
slow, he gives it a good hoeing for its first cul- 
tivation, using only the plow thereafter. 

He also advises cutting the stalks for green 
food when about 4 feet high, and specially 
recommends cutting them close to the ground, 
as tending to make a much heavier second 
growth than when cut higher. His horses, 
mules and cattle eat the stalks with great 
avidity, leaving no part xmconsumed, and 
prefer it much to green Indian Corn or Sorg- 
hum. For Price, see Price-List. 



DHOURO, OR EGYPTIAN CORN. 

{Sorghmn vulgar e.) 



This is a well-known cereal. It produces 
a large quantity of seed, of which fowls 
and animals are fond. Can also be sown 
broad-cast for soiling, or in drills for fod- 
der and seed. If sowed in drills, one peck 
of seed per acre is ample. If sown broad-cast, 
one bushel per acre. For grain, the stalks 
should not be nearer than 10 inches in the 
drill, but if to be cut repeatedly for soiling, 
it is better to sow quite thickly in the hills. 
Seed should not be sown too early, and 
covered from one-half to one inch. If too 
much rain in the spring, the seed will not 
come well; they require more heat than the 



other Sorghums. Rural Branching Sorghum 
or Millo Maize produces the seed heads up- 
right in a vertical position, while the others 
are drooping. The seeds are smaller, but will 
keep longer than the other varieties. The 
stalk grows very large and produces a good 
many large leaves. It suckers and tillers 
more and more the oftener it is cut. It ex- 
ceeds greatly in yield of greeri fodder any of 
the familiar fodder plants, except the ' 'Teo- 
sinte. " — It should be planted exclusively in 
drills four feet apart, 18 to 20 inches in the 
drills. 



BROOM CORN. 

Can be planted the same as corn; put the hills closer together in the row. 
plant an acre. 

JOHNSON CRASS. 

( Sorghum halapense. ) 



Six quarts will 



This has been called Cuba grass, Egyptian 
grass. Means grass, Alabama and Guinea 
grass, etc. 

It seems pretty well agreed now, however, 
to call it Johnson grass, and leave the name 
Guinea grass for the Panicum juinentorum, to 
which it properly belongs. 



It is true that in Mr. Howard's pamphlet,, 
as well as in many periodicals and books, and 
in letters and common usage, this grass has 
been far more generally called Guinea grass 
than the true Guinea grass itself, thus causing 
vast confusion. It is, therefore, assuredly 
time to call each by its right name. Johnson 



92 



KICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AXD GARDEN MANUAL 



.gi'ass is perennial and has cane-like roots, or 
more proiDerlv, underground stems, from the 
Mze of a goose-quill to that of the little hnger. 
These roots are tender, and hogs are fond of 
and thrive on them in winter. The roots 
literally till the ground near the surface, and 
every joint is capable of developing a bud. 
Hence the grass is readily propagated from 
root cutting. It is also propagated from the 
-seeds, but not always 59 certainly: for in some 
localities many faulty seeds are produced, and 
in other places no seeds are matured. Before 
so^^dng the seeds, therefore, they should be 
tested, as should all grass seeds indeed, in 
order to know what proportion will germinate, 
and thus what quantity per acre to sow. One 
bushel of a good sample of this seed is suffi- 
cient for one acre of land. 

The leaf, stalk and panicle of this grass 
resemble those of other sorghums. It grows 
on any land where corn will grow; and like 
the latter, the better the land the heavier the 
crop. On rich land the culms attain a size of 
over half an inch in diameter, and a height 
of seven feet. It should be cut while tender, 
and then all live stock are fond of it; for a 
few weeks are sufficient to render it so coarse 
and hard that animals refuse it, or eat sparingly. 

A few testimonials are here quoted to give 
an idea of the productiveness and value of this 
j)lant. In a letter published in the Rural 
Ccirolmian for 1874, Mr. N. B. Moore, who had 
for more than forty years grown crops, speaks 
of this grass under the name of Guinea grass: 

"My meadow consists of one hundred acres 
of alluvial land near Augusta. * * * In winter 



I employ but four men, who are enough to 
work my packing press; in summer, when 
harvesting, double that number. In autumn 
I usually scarify both ways with sharp, steel- 
toothed harrows, and sow over the stubble a 
peck of red clover per acre, which, with 
volunteer vetches, comes otf about the middle 
of May. The second yield of clover is uni- 
formly eaten up by grasshoppers. The top 
roots remain. to fertilize the then coming- 
Guinea grass, which should be but from two 
to three feet high. -^ * * On such land as 
mine it .will afford three or four cuttings if 
the season is propitious. I use an average of 
five tons of gypsum soon ;\fter the first cut- 
ting, and about the same quantity of the best 
commercial fertilizer, in March and April. 
* * * The grass, which is cut before noon, is 
put tip with horse sulky rakes, in cocks, be- 
fore sun-down." 

Mr. Moore"s income from this field was from 
seven thousand to ten thousand dollars a year. 

Mr. Goelsel, of Mobile, says : ' Tt is un- 
doubtedly the most profitable soiling plant 
yet introduced, and also promises to be ilie 
plant for our Southern hay stacks, provided it 
can be cut every three or four weeks. "" 

Note — Recognizing all the above, I would 
sav, that great care must be taken not to soav 
this grass near cultivated lands. If clone so, 
it should not be allowed to go to seed, as the 
wind will blow them off from the stalks, and 
when it gets amongst cane or other crops it 
causes a gi'eat deal of trouble. It is almost 
impossible to get it out of the land. 



FLOWER SEEDS. 



The following list of Flower seeds is not very large, but it contains all which is desirable 
and which will do well in the Southern climate. I import them from one of the most celebrated 
growers in Prussia, and they are of the best quality. There are very few or no flower seeds 
raised in this country, and Northern houses, which publish large lists and catalogues, get them 
from just the same sources as myself; but they, on an average, sell much higher than I do. 
Some varieties, which are biennial in Europe or North, flower here the first season; in fact, if 
they do not, they generally do not flower at all, as they usually are destroyed by the continued 
long heat of summer. Some kinds grow quicker here and come to a gi-eater perfection than 
in a more Northern latitude. 

Flower seeds require a little more care in sowing than the vegetable seeds. The ground 
jshould be well pulverized and light enough not to bake after a rain. Some of the more delicate 
and finer varieties are better sown in boxes or seed pans, where they can be better handled and 
protected from hard rains or cold weather; the other kinds do not transplant well, and are 
better sown at once where they are to remain, or a few seeds may be sown in smaU pots to 
facilitate transplanting into the garden without disturbing the plants, when large enough. Some 
have very fine seeds, which the mere pressing of the hand or spade to the soil will cover: 
others may be covered one-fourth of an inch, according to their size. Watering should be done 
carefully, and if not done with a syringe, a watering pot, where the holes of the spout are very 
fine, should be used. 

By setting the plants out, or sowing the seeds in the border, consideration should be taken 
of the "height, so that the taller varieties may be in the middle and the dwarf kinds on the edge 
of the bed. 

The seeds are put up at ten cents a package, fifteen packages for one doUar, except, a few 
rare or costly kinds, where the price is noted. All flower seeds in packages are mailed free of 
postage to tiie purchaser. Where there is more than one color, I generalh* import them mixed, 
as I tind that most of my customers do not wish to purchase six packages, or more, of one 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



9S 



variety, in order to get all the colors. One package of Asters, Zinnia, Phlox, Chinese Pink, 
German Stocks, Petunia, Portulaca, and others, will always contain an equal mixture of the 
best colors. 



Altliea Rosen.. Hollyhock. This flower 
has been much improved of late years, and is 
very easily cultivated. Can be sown from 
October till April, Verj^ hardy; from four to 
six feet high. 

Alyssiiin maritimuni. Sweet Alys- 
sum. Ver}^ free flowering plants, about six 
inches high, with white flowers; very fragrant. 
Sow from October till April. 

AiltirhillUlll lliajus. Snapdragon. 
Choice mixed. Showy plant of various colors. 
About two feet high. Should be sown early, 
if perfect flowers are desired. Sow from Oc- 
tober till March. 

Aster. Queen Margaret. German Quilled. 
Perfect double quilled flower, of all shades, 
from white to dark purple and crimson. One 
and a half feet high. 

Aster. Trufaut's Pseony-Flowered Per- 
fection. Large double jjaeony-shaped flowers, 
of fine mixed colors; one of the best varieties. 
Two feet high ; sow from December till March. 
Asters should be sown in a box or in pots, 
and kept in a green-house, or near a window; 
when large enough, transplant into the border. 
Take a shovel of compost and mix with the 
ground before planting. Put three to four 
plants together and they will show better. 
They can be cultivated in pots. 

Adonis aiitiiiiinalis. Flos Adonis, 
or Pheasant's Eye. Showy crimson flower, of 
long duration. One foot high. Sow from 
November till April. 

Aniarantliiis caudatiis. Love Lies 
Bleeding. Long red racemes with blood red 
flowers. Very graceful, three feet high. 

A 111 a r a II t Bi ii s tricolor. Three- 
colored Amaranth. Very show}'; cultivated 
on account of its leaves, which are green, yel- 
low and red. Two to three feet high. 

AliiaraiittiilS bicolor. Two-colored 
Amaranth. Crimson and green variegated 
foliage; good for edging. Two feet high. 

Amaranth US Saiicifoliiis- Foun- 
tain plant. Rich colored foliage; very grace- 
ful. Five to six feet high. All varieties of 
Am aran thus should be sown from February to 
June. 

Aquileg'ia. Columbine. A showy and 
beautiful flower of different colors; two feet 
high. Sow from October till March. Should 
be sown early if flowers are wished; if sown 
late will not bloom till next season. 

Balsainiiia Horteiisis. Lady Slip- 
per. A well known flower of earlj^ culture. 
Requires good ground to produce doiible 
flowers. 

B a I S a III i 11 a. Improved Camelia- 
flowered. Very double and beautiful colors. 
The strain which I otter of this variety is very 
tine; but to have them perfect thej^ should 
not be sown too soon. In rich ground and 



during drj' weather they rec^uire plenty of 
water. 

Balsaiiiiiia camellia flora all>a. 

Pure white flowers, iised for bouquets, about 
two feet high. Sow from February till August. 

B e I I i s Pe re II II is. Daisy. Finest, 
double mixed variety ; four inches high. From 
October till January. 

Browallia elata major. A free 
blooming plant of about 12 inches in height, 
with very showy dark blue flowers. If sown 
in March it will flower all summer, but can 
also be sown in November potted and kei:>t 
under glass, where it will begin to bloom in 
the latter part of December and continue all 
winter. 

Begonia tiiberosa. A very thankful 
green-house plant, with tuberous roots and 
large sho\^'y pink, white or red flowers. It is 
of easy culture and can be kept out of doors 
in a half shady place after the 15th of April. 
Sow from October till March in flower pots. 
Price, per packet, 25 cents. 

Beg°Oiiia Kex. A beautiful and showy 
green-house foliage plant of easy culture. Will 
do well out of doors during summer. months,, 
but requires a shady place. Sow like above. 
Price, per packet, 25 cents. 

Cacalia cocciiiea. Scarlet Tassel 
Flower. A profuse flowering plant, with tas- 
sel-shaped flowers in cluster; one and a half 
feet. Sow February till May. 

Calendula officinalis. Pot Mari- 
gold. A plant which, properly speaking, be- 
longs to the aromatic herbs, but sometimes- 
cultivated for the flowers, which vary in dif- 
ferent shades of yellow; one and a half feet 
high. From January till April. 

Celosia cristata. Dwarf Cock's comb. 
Well known class of flowers which are very 
ornamental, producing large heads of crimson 
and yellow flowers; one to two feet high. Sow 
from February till August. 

€ lie! ran til US Clieiri. Wall Flower. 

This flower is highly esteemed in some })arts 
of Europe, but does not grow very perfectly 
here, and seldom produces the large spikes of 
double flowers which are very fragrant. Two 
feet high. November till March. 

Campanula Speculum. BeU- 
Flower, or Venus' Looking-Glass. Free, flower- 
ing plants of ditt'erent colors, from white to 
dark blue; one foot high. Sow December till 
March. 

Ceiilaiirea cyaniis. Bottle Pink. 
A hardy annual of easy culture, of various 
colors; two feet high. 

C e II t a II r ea sua voleiis. Yellow, 
Sweet Sultan. December to April. 

Cineraria li y b r i d a. A beautiful 
green-house i^lanl. Seed should be sown in 



94: 



RICHARD FROTSCHER's ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 





Amarantlius Salicifolius, Fountain Plant. 



Trufaut's Ppeony-Flowered Aster. 





Althea Hosea. 



German Quilled Aster. Amaranthus Tricolor. 




Amarantlius Caudatus. 



Double Daisy. 



Adonis autuninalis. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES, 



95 




Cyclamen Persicum. 



October or November, and they will flower in 
spring. Per packet, 25 cents. 

Cineraria Maritima. A handsome 
border plant, which is cultivated on account 
of its silvery white leaves. Stands our summer 
well. 

Coleiis« A well known and beautiful 
bedding plant which can be easily propagated 
by seeds which produce different shades of 
colored plants. 

Cyclamen persicum. Alpine Violet. 
A green-house plant with tuberous or rather 
bulbous roots, blooming abundantly, being 
possessed of very ornamental foliage and of 
easy culture. It should not be missing in any 
collection of gTcen-house plants. Sow in 
August and September in pots, transplant in 
small pots when large enough, and keep either 
in green-house or a room near the window, 
and give plenty of light and air. Keep Bulbs 
dry during summer. Price, ]}er packet, 25 
cents. 

Correopsis. (Calleopsis.) Bright Eye 
Daisy. Handsome free blooming plants, of 
the easiest culture, 2 to 3 feet high, with yel- 
low and brown daisy-like flowers. December 
to March. 

Clirysantliemiim tricolor. (Cari- 
natum.) Summer Chrj'-santhemum. Showy 
summer bloomers of different colors, 12 to 15 



inches high. If grouped together they have 
a pleading effect. Sow in March and April. 

Diantlius Barbatus. Sweet William. 
A well known j)lant which has been much im- 
proved of late years. Their beautiful colors 
make them very showy. Should be sown early, 
otherwise they will not flower the first spring; 
one and a half feet high. October till April. 

Diantlius Cliinensis. Chinese Pink. 
A beautiful class of annuals of various colors, 
which flower very profusely in early sjjring 
and summer: one foot high. From October 
till April. 

Diantlius Heddeivig^g^ii. Japan 
Pink. This is the most showy of any of the 
annual pinks. The flowers are very large and 
of brilliant colors; one foot high. Sow from 
October till April. 

Diantlins plumaris. Border Pink. 
A fragrant pink used for edging. The flowers 
are tinged, generally pink or white with a 
dark eye. Does not flower the first year; two 
feet high. Sow from January till April. 

Diantlius caryopliyllU!^. Carna- 
tion Pink. This is a well known and highly 
esteemed class of flowers. They are double, 
of different colors, and verj" fragrant; can be 
sown either in fall or spring; should be shaded 
during midsummer and protected from hard 



96 



RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




Aquilegia, or Columbine. 



Cheiranthus Cheiri. 




Dirtuthus Chluensis, Double. 



Ceutaurea Cyauus. 



Dianthus Barbatus. 





Celosia Cri.stata. 



Balsamiua Camelia-Flowered. 



Calendula officinalis. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



U7 



rains ; three to f o\ir feet higli. November till 
April. 

DiaiitlillS Picotee. Finest hybrids. 
Stage flowers saved from a collection of over 
500 named varieties; per package, 50 cents. 

Dmiitiitis caryopliylliiis, Marg^a- 
ritae robuj^tuis, fl. pi Semi-high 
double Margaret Carnations. This beautiful 
pink originated in Italy. It is of a dwarfish 
habit, grows from 12 to 15 inches high; the 
stalks are exceedingl}^ strong, and therefore 
need no support. The flowers are much varie- 
gated, occasionally producing yellow ones. 
What makes this variety remarkable, is, that 
it flowers after four months from the time 
of sowing the seed, and produces about 80 
per cent, of double flowers, unlike other Car- 
nations, which are biennial and only bloom 
the second year. 

Diantliiiis puiiiila. Early dwarf 
flowering Carnation. If sown early, this 
variety will flower the first season. They are 
quite dwarfish and flower very profusely. 
November till April. 

Delphiiaiuiii Imperialis, fl. pi. 

Imperial flowering Larkspur. Very handsome 
variety of symmetrical form. Mixed colors; 
bright red, dark blue and red striped; Ig feet 
high. 

Delphiiiiiiiii ajacis. Kocket Lark- 
spur. Mixed colors; very showy; two and a 
half feet. 

Delpiiiiiiiiiii Cliiiieiisis. Dwarf 
China Larkspur. Mixed colors; ver}^ 
pretty; one foot high. November 
till April. 

Note. — None of the Delphiuiums or Lark- 
spars transplant well, and are better sown 
at once where they are intended to remain. 

Dahlia. Large flowering Dahlia. 
Seed sown in the spring will flower 
by June. Very pretty colors are ob- 
tained from seed, the semi-double or 
single ones can be pulled up as they 
bloom; but those seeds which are 
saved from the double varieties will 
produce a good percentage of double 
flowers. February till June. 

£sclisclioltzia Californi- 

ca. California Poppy. Averj^free 
flowering plant, good for masses. 
Does not transplant well. One foot 
high. December till April. 

Oaillardia Lioreiitziaiia. 

Two-colored Gaiilardia. Very showy 
plants which continue to flower for a 
long time. Flowers red, bordered 
with orange yellow. One and a half 
feet high. January till April. 

Oomplii'ena alba and 
pur pure a. White and Crimson 
Batchelor Button or Globe Amaranth. 
Well known variety of flowers; very 
early and free flowering; continue 
^to flower for a long time. Two feet 
^ligh. From February till August. 



Oeraniuui Zouale. Zonale Ger- 
anium. Seed saved from large flowering va- 
rieties of difl'erent colors; should be sown in 
seed pans, and when large enough transplanted 
into pots, where they can be left, or trans- 
planted in spring into the open ground. 

Oeraniuni pelar$;^oniuui. Large 
flowering Pelargonium. Spotted varieties, 25 
cents per package. 

Oeraniuni odoratissiiiia. Apple 
scented Geranium. Cultivated on account of 
its fragrant leaves; 25 cents per package. Both 
of these kinds are pot plants, and require 
shade during hot weather. Should be sown 
during fall and winter. 

Heliotropiuin. Mixed varieties with 
dark and light shaded floAver. A well known 
plant, esteemed for the fragrance of its flowers, 
which are produced during the whole summer 
in great profusion. This plant is generally 
propagated by cutting, but can also be raised 
from seed. Should be sown in a hot-bed if 
sown early. 

Heliehi'ysuni monstrosuni al- 
bum. White Everlasting Flower. Very 
showy double flowers. One and a half feet 
high. 

Heliclirysuin nioaistrosuni rub- 
rum. Eed Everlasting Flower. Very orna- 
mental. One and a half feet high. December 
till April. Does not transplant well. 




RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 








Cacalia Cocciuea. 



DelpMnium Chinensis. 



Diantlius Caryophyllus. 





Centaurea Suavolens. 



Purple Globe Amarantti. 





Diantlius Picotee. 



Diauthus Heddewiggii. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



99 



Hell a II thus 11. pi. Double Flowering 
Suullower. A well kuowu plant, with showy 
yellow flowers. The double is often cultivated 
in the Hower garden. The single varieties 
are cultivated mostly for the seed. They are 
said to be anti-malarious. Four feet high. 
February till May. 

Il>ei'i$i> aiiiara. White Candytuft. A 
well known plant raised a good deal by florists 



for bouquets. Can be sown at dijffi erent times 
to have a succession of flowers. One foot high. 

Iberis uiiibelata rosea. Purple 
Candytuft. One foot. October till April. 

I inpatient l^iiltani. This handsome 
single variety of the well-known Balsam or 
Lady Slipper, is surely a good acquisition to 
our rich collection of summer bloomers. Of 
half high growth, being literally covered with 




Earlv Dwarf Doubl? Carnation Pink. 



Gaillardia Bicolor 



Lobelia Erinus. 




Heliotropium. 



I 





Mathiola Annua. 



Geranium Zonale. 



100 



RICHARD FROTSCHEE's ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




Blue Grove Love. 




Petunia hybrida. 




\ 



^4 









Xisrella Damascena. 



pale scarlet flowers diuiiigtlie summer months, 
it cannot be surpassed for bedding out. Price, 
per packet, 25 cents. 

L.iniini g^raudifloriiiii rubrtiui. 

Scarlet Flax. A very pretty plant for masses 
or borders, with bright scarlet flowers, dark 
in the centre. One foot. January till April. 

Lobelia eriutis. Lobelia. A very 
gi-acetnl plant with white and blue flowers, 
well adapted for hanging baskets or border. 
Half foot. October tiU March. 

L.ycliiiis elialcecloiiloa. Lychnis. 
Fine j^lants ^vith scarlet, white and rose flow- 
ers. Two feet. December till Apiil. 

ITIathiola annua. Ten weeks stocks. 
This is one of the finest annuals in cultivation. 
Large flowers of all colors, from white to dark 
blue or crimson. Should be sown in pots or 
pans, and when large enough transplanted into 
rich soil. One and a qiuu-ter feet. October 
till March. 

ITIeseiiibryatttheniiini cry^f^Hi" 

num. Ice plant. Xeat plant vrith icy look- 
ing foliage. It is of spreading habit. Good 
for baskets or beds. One foot. February till 

March. 

Jliniulns tiifriuiis. Monkey flower. 
Showy flowers of yellow and brown. Should 
be sown in a shady place. Does not trans- 
plant well. Half foot. December till ^lareh. 

I^Iatricaria eapeiisis. Double Mat- 
licai-ia. ^Miite double flowers, resembling the 
Daisy, but smaller, are fine for bouquets; 
blooms nearly the whole summer. Two feet. 
December till ^lareh. 

Mimosa p u d i r a . Sensitive plant. A 
cuiious and interesting plant which folds up 
its leaves when touched. One foot. February 
till June. 

IYIirabili«« jalapa. Marvel of Peru. 
A well-known plant of easy culture: producing 
flowers of vaiious colors. It forms a root 
which can be preserved from one year to an- 
other. February till June. Three fe«t. 

Myosotis palustris. Forget-me-not. 
A fine little plant with small, blue, star-like 
flowers. Should have a moist, .shady sitiiation. 
Does not succeed so well here, as in Europe, of 
which it is a native. Half foot high. Decem- 
ber till :\Iarch. 

IVemopliila Insi^nis. Blue Grove 
Love. Plants of easy culture, very pretty and 
profuse bloomers. Bright blue with Avhite 
centre. One foot high. 

IVemophila maculata. Large white 
flowers spi^tted with violet. One foot high. 
December tiU April. 

]>ig:ella dania!»rena. Love in a 
Mist. Plants of easy culture, with light blue 
flowers. Does not transplant well. One foot 
high. December till April. 

]\ieremberg^ia ;;ra€ili$. Xierem- 
bergia. Xice plants with delicate foliage, and 
white flowers tinted with lilac. One foot high. 
November till April. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



101 




Lychnis Chalcedonica 





Goran i mil Pelargonium. 



Ice Plant. 





Douljle ^latriearia. 



Hcliclirv.^uni Monstrosiuii Allmni 



102 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



CBiiotliera Laiiiarckiana. Eyen- 
ing Primrose. Sliowy, large yello^v flowers. 
December till April. Two feet high. 

Papaver Soiiinifernni. Double 
flowering Poppy. Of different colors; very 

showy. 

Papaver raniinoiiUis flowered. 

Double fringed flowers, very showy. Cannot 
be transplanted. Two feet high. October 
till March. : 

Petunia liybrida. Petunia. Splendid 
mixed hvbrid varieties. A Terr decorative 



plant of various colors, well known to almost 
every lover of flowers. Plants are of spread- 
ing habit; about one foot high. Januai-v till 
May. 

Phlox I>rmiiiiioiidii. Drummond's 
Phlox. One of the best and most popular 
annuals in cultivation. Their various colors 
and length of flowering, with easy culture, 
jnake them favorites with every one. All fine 
colors mixed. One foot high. December till 
Ax^iil. 

Plilox Driiiiiiiioiidii g^raudiflora 
alha. Pure white, some with purple or 
violet eye. 

Phlox DriiiiiiiiotidBi g^randi- 
flora, Stellata spleiideiis. This is 
admitted to be the richest colored and most 
effective of all large flowered Phloxes. It com- 
bines all the good qualities of the Splendens, 
with the addition of a clearly defined, pure 
white star, which contrast strikingly with the 
vivid crimson of the flowers. 




Impatieus Sultaui. 



Papaver Rannnculas Flowered. 




Oenothera Lamarckiana. 




FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



103 




Phlox Drummondii Grandiflora, 





Phlox Drummoudii, Grandiflora Stellata Spleudeus. 



Scabiosa nana. 



104 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




Primula ^'t'l•is 





Petunia Hybrida Douljle. 



Tagetes Erecta. 




TasutfS I'aTula 



Yinca Rosea and Alba. 



Reseda Odorata. 



Portlllaca. A small plant of great 
beauty, and of the eisiest culture. Does best 
in a well exposed .'-it lation, where it has 
plenty of. sun. The liowers are of various 
colors, from white to bright scarlet and crim- 
son. The plant is good for edging vases or 
pots; or where large plants are kept in tubs, 
the surface can be tilled with this neat little 
genus of plants. Half foot high. February 
till August. 

Portlllaca g^randi flora, fl. pi. 

Double Portulaca. The same variety of colors 
with semi-double and double flowers. Half 
foot high. February till August. 

Priitlllla veri8. Cowslip. An herba- 
ceous plant of various colors, highly esteemed 
in Europe. Half foot high. December till 
April. 

Primula ciiiiieaisis. Chinese Prim- 
rose. A green-house plant, which flowers 
profusely and continues to bloom for a long 
time; should be sown early to insure the plant 
flowering well. Different colors; mixed, per 
package, 25 cents. One and a half feet high. 
October till Februarv. 



Pyrethrum aiirea. Golden Feather. 
The flowers resemble Asters. It has bright 
yellow leaves which make it very show}" as a 
border if massed with plants, such as Coleus, 
etc. 

Reseda odorata g^raiidiflora. 

Sweet Mignonette. A fragrant plant with 
large spikes of yellowish red flowers and a 
favorite with everybody. Fifteen inches high. 
December till April. 

IScabJosa nana. Dwarf Moirrning 
Bride. Plants of double flowers of various 
colors. One foot high. December till April. 

8as>oiiaria caiabrica. Soapwort. 
A very free flowering annual, of easy culture, 
resembles somewhat in leaves the Sweet 
AYilliam. One and a half feet high. Decem- 
ber till April. 

!§alvia 8pleiideii8. Scarlet SaMa 
or Eed Flowering Sage. A pot or greenhouse 
plant, but which can be grown as an annual, 
as it flowers freely from seed the first year. 
Two to three feet high. February till April. 



FOR tHE SOUTHERN STATES. 



Ids 




ftNDOUKEAo 



Doul)lo Zinnia 





Striped Italian Verl)ena. 




Toi'enia Fournieri. 



Choicest Larsje English Pansy 



106 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




Zinnia Elegans, Grandiflora Robui^ta Plenissima. 



Silene Aineria. Lobel's Catchfly. 
A free blooming plant of easy culture; flowers 
almost anywhere. Eed and white. One and 
a half feet high. 

Taget*?S erecta. African or Tall- 
growing Marigold. Very showy annuals for 
borders, with bright yellow flowers growing 
xipright. Two and a half feet high. 

Tag"etes Psttula. French or Dwarf 
Marigold. A very compact dwarf growing 
variety, covered with yellow and brown flowers. 
One and a half feet high. January till April. 



Torenia FoiirnieH. A plant from 
Mexico of recent introduction, but which has 
become very popular in a short time. It 
stands the heat well, is well adapted to pot 
culture and makes one of the most valuable 
bedding plants we have. The flowers are 
of a skj^ blue color, with three spots of dark 
blue. The seeds are very fine and take a good 
while to germinate. It transplants very easily. 

Verbena hybrid a. Hybridized Ver- 
bena. A well known and favorite flower for 
borders. Their long floM'ering and great 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



107 




Hybridized Verbena. 

diversity of color make them 
valuable for every garden, how- 
ever small. All colors mixed. 

One and a half feet high, Jan- 
uary till April. 

Verbena Striped Ita- 
lian. These are beautiful 
striped kinds of all colors with 
large eyes. 

Verbena Candidissima. White 
Verbena. Pure white Verbena of more or 
less fragrance. One and a half feet high. 
January till April. 

Vinca rosea and alba. Ked and 

White Periwinkle. Plants of shining foliage, 
with white and dark rose colored flowers, 
which are produced the whole summer and 
autumn. Two feet high. February till April. 

Viola odorata. Sweet Violet. Well 
known edging plant, which generally is pro- 
pagated by dividing the plants; but can also 
be raised from seed. Half foot high. Sow 
from January till March. 

Viola tricolor maxima. Large 
flowering English Pansy. This is one of the 
finest little plants in cultivation for pots or 
the open ground. They are of endless colors 
and markings. When planted in the garden, 
they will show better if planted in masses, 
and a little elevated above the level of the 
garden. Half foot high. October till March. 

£<arg:e Trimardeau Pansy. This 
is the largest variety in cultivation; the flowers 
are well formed, generally three-spotted; quite 
distinct; the plants grow compact. 

Non Plus Ultra. Benary's Elite Pans3\ 
This new variety from Germany is the finest 
of all Pansies. Endowed with well-formed 
flowers in endless colors and shades ; they form 
a valuable acquisition to our many varieties 
in cultivation, and should not be missing in 
any garden. Price, 10c. per i^acket. 

Cassiers improved Pansy, A 




Larsre Trimardeau Pansy, 




Double Portulaca. 
beautiful varietj'^ with large flowers of most 
perfect form, exquisite coloring and ver}' 
compact growth. The flowers are generally 
five-spotted but more distinctly marked than 
the Trimardeau. Price, 25c. jier packet. 

Bug^nots improved blotched 
Pansy. This new variety is certainly the 
handsomest of all the Pansies and like the 



108 



RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



Odiers are five blotched and generally yellow 
or white edged. The flowers are of the most 
perfect form and beautiful coloring. This 
variety is one of the best and forms a fine 
acquisition to our alreadj^ large collection. 
Price per packet, 2oc. 

Ziiiiiia eleg:aiis, fl. pi. Double Zin- 
nia. Plants of very easy culture, flowering 
very profusely through the whole summer and 
fall; producing double flowers of all colors, 
almost as large as the flower of a Dahlia. 
Three feet high. February till August. 

Zinnia eleg^ans puniila, II. pi. 

Dwarf Double Mixed. A new dwarf section, 



especially desirable. The compact, bushy 
plants rarely grow over two feet high, and are 
covered with large flowers of great Ijeauty. 

Zinnia ^le$;ans g^randiflora 
robusta plenissinia. A new variety 
recently introduced here from Germany. The 
plants of this new class of showy and at- 
tractive annuals are of very robust growth and 
produce very large 'and extremely double 
flowers, measuring from 4 to 5 inches in 
diameter. The seeds I offer for sale, come 
direct from the originator, and contain about 
eight different beautiful colors, mostly very 
bright. 



CLIMBING PLANTS. 



Antiis^onnni Leptopus. Eosa mon- 
tana. One of the finest perennial climbers of 
rapid growth with long racemes of beautiful 
deep pink flowers. Being a native of Mexico, 
it is well adapted to our climate and will stand 
our most severe winters without any further 
protection than perhaps a slight cover of moss 
or straw. Sow in February or March in flower 
pots, and transplant into the open ground in 
May. Will flower freely the first year. With- 
out any doubt the finest climber for this sec- 
tion. 




Aristolochia eleg^ans. A new variety 
of the well known ''Butchma/t's pipe," (which 
however will not grow here;) of vigorous 
gro^lh and quite hardy in our climate. It is 
a profuse bloomer, bearing large flowers of a 
rich purple color with irregular branched 
markings of creamy white and golden yellow 
centre \\ath rich velvety purple. This plant 
is one of the most thankful of all climbers, 
blooming when quite young and continuing 
to do so the whole summer. Will stand our 
winter without protection. Sow in January 




Morniiiii (ilorv. 




Climbing Cobpea. 



Mixed Thuubersia. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



lOD 





llvacinth Bean. 



Maurandia Barclayaua. 




Aristolochia Ele^aiis. 



and February in flower pots and transplant in 
oj^en ground when large enough. 

fienincasa cerifera. Wax Gourd. 
A strong growing vine with long shaped, dark 
crimson fruit, which looks very ornamental. 
It is used for preserves. 

Cardiospernniin. Balloon Vine. A 
quick-growing climber, the seeds of which are 
in a pod, shaped like a miniature balloon, 
therefore the name. 

Cobaea !§ can dens. Climbing Cob»a. 
Large pui-ple bell-shaped flowers. Should be 
sown in a hot-bed and not kept too moist. 
Place the seed edgewise in the ground. Twenty 
feet high. January till April. 

Convolvulus major. Morning Glory. 
Well known vine with various handsomely 



colored flowers, of easy culture. Grows almost 
anywhere. Ten feet high. February till July. 

Cueurbita. Ornamental Gourd. Mixed 
varieties or Ornamental Gourds of different 
shapes and sizes. Februaiw till May. 

Cucurbita Lag^^naria dulcis. 

Sweet Gourd. A strong growing vine of which 
the young fruits are used like Squash. 
February till April. 

DolicllOS JLablab. Hyacinth Beans. 
Free growing plant, with purple and white 
flowers. March till April. 

IpoinaBa ^uanioclit rosea. Ked 

Cypress Vine. Very beautifiil. delicate foliage, 
of rai)id growth, ^ith scarlet flowers. 

Iponiaea Quanioclit alba. White 
C}T3ress Vine. The same as the Red variety. 



110 



EICHAED FKOTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GABDEN MA^'UAL 



IpoiiiBBa Bona ]\ox. Large Flowering 

Evening Gloiy. A vine of rapid growtli, ^tli 
l)eantiftil bine and vi-Mte flowers wliich open 
in tJie evening. Twenty feet liigh. Febniary 
till June. 

Tliis is the Moon flower advertised in 
Northern catalogues as a novelty, notwith- 
standing the fact that it has been known here 
for the past centtiry. 

Latliyriis odoi'iitus. Sweet Peas. 
Beautiful flowers of all colors, very shoAvy. 
Good for cut flowers. Six feet high, i)eceni- 
bar tUl April. 

ITIaiiraiidia Barclayaiia. Mixed 
Maurandia. A slender growing vine of rapid 
growth. Hose pui-^^le and white colors mixed. 
Ten feet high. February till April. 

ITlJiia LiObata. A showy plant from 
Mexico of the well-known Ipomoea family with 
beautiful spikes or racemes of yellowish white 

flowers. 

The buds are at first of a bright red. but soon 
change to orange yellow, and when in full 
bloom to a yellowish white, forming a fine 
contrast with the dense and luxuriant foHage. 
This iDlant does well in sunny situations and 
cannot be surj^assed for covering arbors, 
trellises, etc. , but is however sometimes afl^ected 
by our heavy and lasting summer showers. 
Should be sown early in order to get it to 
perfection as it blooms only when fully gi'own. 

Price, per packet. 25c. 

?Iaiiiordica Balsaiiiiiia. Balsam 
Apple. A cHmbing plant of very rapid growth, 
producing Cucumber-Hke fruits, with warts 
on them. They ar-e beheved to contain some 
medicinal virtues. They are put in jars with 
alcohol and are used as a di'essing for cuts, 
bruises, etc. 

Liiiffa aciitau§rnla. Dish Bag Tine. 
A very rajDid gi'owing vine of the Gourd family. 
"V^Tien the fiiiit is dry. the fibrous substance, 
which covers the seeds, can be used as a rag. 
February till April. 



Seeliiuui edule. Vegetable Pear or 
Miiliton. A rapid growing vine with grape- 
like leaves, of which the fruit is eaten; there 
are two varieties, white and green. It has 
only one seed, and the whole fruit has to be 
planted. 

TropoBoliim iiiajiis. Xasturrium. 

Trailing plants with elegant flowers of different 
shades, mostly yellow and crimson, which are 
produced in gi'eat abundance. Four feet high. 

Febntary till April. 

T li u 11 b e r ^ i a . ^lixed Thunbergia. 
Very ornamental vines, with yellow bell-shaped 
flowers with dark eve. Six feet high. Februarv 
riU Mav. 




Mina Lobata. 



BULBOUS ROOTS. 



Anemones, Double floweiing. Planted 
and treated the same as the Kanunculus. They 
are of gr-eat varieties in color. 

Double-Dutch. 40 cents per dozen. 

Dahlias. Fine double-named varieties. 
Plants so well known for their brilliancy, 
diversity of colors and profuse flowering 
qualities, that they require no recommenda- 
tion. They can be planted from February 
till May: they thrive best in rich loamy soil. 
They should be tied up to stakes, which ought 
to be driven into the ground before or wlyen 
planting them. To have them flower late' in 
the season they should be planted late in the 
spring, and the flower buds nipped off when 
they appeal-; treated in this way, they will 



produce perfect flowei-s during fall. Un- 
divided roots, $3.00 per dozen. 

The roots I offer are of the very best type, 
having taken special pains to discard varieties 

which did not flower well here. 

Gladiolus. Hybrid Gladiolus. One of 
the best summer flowering bulbs; they have 
been greatly improved of late years, and almost 
every color has been produced: is tinged and 
blotched in all shades from delicate rose to 
dark vermillion. When planted at intervals 
during spring, they will flower at different 
times, but those that are planted earliest pro- 
duce the finest flowers. The roots should be 
taken up in the fall. 



FOR THE SOUTHER^J STATES. 



Ill 




Lilium Lancifolium Rubruni. 



Double Hyaciuth. 



Single Hyacinth. 



i 



112 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 





Dahlias. 



Anemones. 



Hybrids mixed, first choice (extra), 10c. 
each; 75c. per dozen. 

Hybrids white ground, first choice, 10c. each; 
75c. per dozen. 

Hybrids mixed, 50c. per dozen. 

Oloxiiiias. These are really bulboxis 
green-house plants, but they can be cultivated 
in pots and kept in a shady place in the garden, 
or window. Thej" are very beautiful; color 
from white to dark violet and crimson. The 
leaves are velvety, and on some varieties very 
large. They should be planted early in spring; 
require sandy ground and a good deal of moist- 
ure during fiowering time. French Hybrids, 
strong bulbs, 25c. each; $2.50 per dozen. 

Ilyaieintlis. (dutch.) Double and single. 
The Hyacinth is a beautiful flowering bulb, 
well suited for open ground or pot culture. 
They should be planted from October till 
February. If planted in pots it is well to keep 



in a cool, rather dark place, till they are well 
started, when they can be placed in the full 
light and sun. Double and single, 10 cents 
each; 75c. per dozen. Named varieties, $1.00 
per dozen. 

Narcissus. Bulbs of the easiest culture, 
planted from November to January. 

Double Whiie, sweet scented, 35c. per dozen. 

Paper WJiite, (single), Price, 5c. each; 50c. 
per dozen. 

Trumpet Major (single), very fine, 50c. per 
dozen. 

JLiliuiii ti$; rill II 111. Tiger Lilj^ A well 
known variety, very showy and of easy culture; 
10 cents each. 

Liliciiii ti^riiiiiiii, fl. g>i This is a 
very fine variety; it is perfectly double, and 
the petals are imbricated almost as regularly 
as a camelia flower. Ver}"^ fine, 15 cents each. 



JAPAN LILIES. 



liiliuill aiiratlllll. Golden Band Lily. 
This is a very handsome lily; the flowers are 
large and white, each petal having a yellow 
stripe. It is of easy culture. A loamy, dry 
soil suits it best, and planted one inch deep. 

The past season I had occasion to see several 
of this noble lily in bloom, and it is really fine; 
half a dozen flowers opening at the same time 
and measuring fi om six to nine inches across. 
It is very fragrant. I expect some fine bulbs, 
same as I had last year, imported direct from 



their native country. Flowering bulbs, 25c. 
each. 

Liliiiiii laiicifoliiini album. Pure 
white, Japan Lil}', 30 cents each. 

JLiliiiiii laiicifoliuiii r ii b r u in. 
White and red spotted, 15 cents each. 

JLiliuiii laiicifoliuni r o s e ii in. 
Rose spotted, 15c. each. 

These Japan Lilies are very beautiful and 
fragrant. Should be planted from October 
till January. Perfectly suited to this climate. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



113 



PaBOiiia *!ijiieiisi8. Chiuese or herba- 
ceous Paionia. Herbaceous plants of different 
colors and great beauty; they should be planted 
during fall in a shady situation, as they flower 
early in spring. If planted too late they will 
not flower perfectly ; 25c. each. 

RaniilictilllS. Double Flowering. The 
roots can be planted during fall and winter, 
either in the oj^en ground or in pots. The 
French varieties are more robust than the 
Persian, and the flowers are larger. The ground 
should be rather dry, and if planted in the 
open ground, it will be well to have the spot 



a little higher than the bed or border. French 
Eanunculus, 25c. per doz. 

Scill:i |>eriii''i;iitu. These are green- 
house bulbs at the North, but here thej' are 
hardy, and do well in the open ground. There 
are two varieties — the blue and the white. They 
grow up a shoot, on the end of which the 
flowers appear, forming a triiss. Plant from 
October till January. 25 cents each. 

Tuli !>!«>. Double and single Tulips thrive 
better in a more Northern latitude than this, 
but some years they flower well here, and as 
they are cheap, a few flowering bull)s will pay 




Double 'lulip. 








Single Tulip. 



Tuberoses, double flowering. 



8. 



IM 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 





E.anuueuliis. 

the small amount they cost. They should not 
be x)lanted later than December, and placed 
very shallow in the ground; not more than 
one-third of the bulb should be covered. When 
near flo^\-ering they recjuire a good deal of 
moisture. Single and double, 50 cents per doz. 



Scilla peruviana. 

Tiiberoses. /Double Flowering. Thej- 
are ornamental for the garden, and very 
valuable for making bouquets, on account of 
their pure white color and great fragrance. 
Plant during the spring months. Strong 
bulbs, 10 cents each; 75 cents per dozen. 



THE 



AUTAUQUA CORN AND SEED PLANTER. 

Unequalled in SimplicUy, Durdbility and Efficiency. 

The Best is the Cheapest. Peefectlt Simple. Simply Peefect. 

Directions. 

To set the seed cup. — Loosen the set-screw and draw out the in- 
side or naiTOw guage far enough to drop the desired number of 
seeds. Then tighten the screw. For ordinary planting, only the 
narrow guage should be moved. In j)utting in jDhosphate, or a large 
quantity of seed, both the narrow and wide guages should be drawn 
out together. By taking out the screws, the guages may be drawn 
entirely out. 

In experienced or careful hands the machine will plant perfectly 
in any kind or condition of soil, mellow or soddy, dry or wet. 

To operate the planter. — Place the blades in the ground to the 
desired depth, in advance of you, having the "step" to the front, 
as in the cut, without its touching the ground. Then pressing down 
forward on the handle, walk forward. The step will press on the 
ground and a charge taken for the next hill. After walking past 
the planter, still pressing on the handle, lift it from the ground to 
i;|:. the place for the next hill; as this is done the charge of seed vill 

be heaed rattling down upon the steel blades, and the operator will 
know the seed is ready for the next hill. Use the planter as you 
would a cane, or as much so as iDOSsible. The blades must always 
enter the ground closed, and come out open. 

Its efficiency. — "We claim that the -'Chautauqua" is not equalled 
as a dropper and planter. By actual trial in the field with a number of good j)lanters, it has 
been shown that our machine will cover the seed in different soils and at different depths, 
shallow or deep, better than any other planter. Our new improved seed slide, having double 
guages for adjusting the seed cup, enables the planter to drop accurately small or large seed, in 
the quantity desired. Price, 2.25. 




Patented. April 4, 1882. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



115 



THE NEW YORK SEED DRILL. 

MATTHEWS' PATENT. 




I take pleasure in calling your attention to a perfect Seed Drill. This DriU was invented 
and perfected by the father of the seed-drill business— Mr. E. G. Matthews. It has been his 
aim for ye:irs to make a perfect drill and do away with the objections found in all others, and in 
the New York he has accomplished it. 



Its advantages over other drills are as follows: 



1. Mirkei*-bar under the frame held by 
clamps, easy to adjust to any width by simply 
loosening thumb nuts. 

2. xldjustable plow which opens a wide 
furrow, and can be set to sow at any depth. 

3. Open seed conductor to show see 1 drop- 
ping. 

4. jBtrs ifiseetZconcZador, for scattering seed 
in wide furrows, prevents disturbing strong 
plants when thinning out— an important 
feature. 

5. Ridged roller. 

C>. Dial plate in full sight of operator, and 



made of patent combination white metal which 
prevents rust. 

7. Dial plate set on fulcrum, and hence 
holds close up, preventing seed from spilling. 

8. It has a large seed-box with hinged cover. 

9. Machine will stand up alone when not 
in use, not liable to tip over. 

It is the SIMPLEST, MOST COMPACT and 
EASIEST DRILL TO HANDLE, being only 
32 inches long. 

It covers the seed better and runs very easy. 

Packed in crates for shipping. Weighs about 
45 pounds. Price, $9.00. 



MATTHEW'S HAND CULTIVATOR, 



The Matthew's Hand Cultivatok is one of 
the best implements in use for weeding be- 
tween row crops, and for tiat cultivation 
generally, and is an indispensable companion 
to the seed drill. 

It is thoroughly constructed throughout, 
veiy durable; easy to operate. A hoy can do 
as much with it as six men icith hoes. It spreads 
from G to 11 inches, and will cut all the ground 
covered, even when spread to its greatest ex- 
tent. Its teeth are of a new and improved 
pattern and thoroughly pulverize and mellow 
the soil. The depth of cultivating may be 
accuratelv gauged bv raising and lowering the 
wheels, which is quickly done by the use of a 
thumb screw. 




Price, $5.00 boxed. 



116 



RICHAED FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



i I 



PLANET JR.'' WHEEL HOES 

THE **PC4I\ET Jr." I>01jBLE-\f HEEL HOE. 

CrLTn'ATOK, E,AKE A^'D Plow Combined. 



This is an invaluable implement 
to eveiy tiller of the soil. It is the 
best and cheapest made for the 
cultivation of garden vegetables 
on a large scale, as one man with 
it will do more work in a' day than 
6 with ordinary garden hoes. The 
attachments consist of four cul- 
tivator teeth, two rakes, two long 
hoes and two plows. The wheels 
being adjustable both sides of the 
row can be cultivated at the same 
time. Having leaf guards which 
allow the cultivation of large 
jolants, it is indispensable for cul- 
tivating beets, carrots, peas and 
beans when already advanced in 
growth. Taking all in all, it is 
one of the best cultivators made. 

Price, $7.00 net. 





THE **PEAIVET" JR." 
SIJ%'OEE-WHEEE HOE. 



CULTrS'ATOK, KaKE AND PlOW 

Combined. 

This tool is considerably lighter 
than the "Double WheeU' Hoe; 
having almost similar attachments 
it is capable of doing nearly the 
same kind of work. It is furnished 
with one pair of rakes, one paii" of 
curved-point hoes, three cultiva- 
tor teeth, one large garden plow 
and one detachable leaf guard. 
All the blades are steel, hardened 
in oil, tempered and polished. It 
is used for cultivating both sides 
of a row at one passage. 

Price, 85.50 net. 



THE *'FIRE FLY," 

Single-Wheel Hoe, Cultivatoe 
AND Plow Co^ibined. 

This implement is almost identi- 
cal with the "Planet Jr.," Single- 
Wheel Hoe. The tools supplied 
with it are two curved-point hoes, 
a set of three cultivating teeth and 
a large garden plow. The hoes 
work either to or from the row. 
The reversible cultivator teeth can 
be used for deep work in sets of 
two or three. The garden plow is 
valuable for furrowing, covering, 
hilling, etc. 

Price, $4.25 net. 




FOR TUE SOUTHERN STATES. 



117 




THE "FIRE FLY" 

Wheel Garden Plow. 

This tool is intended for those who have 
small gardens and a moderate amount of time 
to work in them. It enables them to raise 
vegetables for their family or for market, with 
a small expenditure of labor and time. 

Price, S2.25 net. 

CLEVE'S ANCLE TROWEL. 

This handy digger was originally intended 
for digging plantains and other weeds from 
lawns, its slim blade, made strong by its angular form, being suited for prying and twisting; 
but it has also found great favor among the ladies as a flower cultivator for loosening the soil 
in pots, and among young plants for transplanting. The blade and shank are of one solid j)iece 
of best steel, set firmlv in a nice handle. It serves every purpose of the old form of trowel. 
Price, No. 1, iOc. ; No^ 2, 3Uc. ; No. 3, 20c. 

IMPROVED PLANTING DIBBLE. 

This tool designed for setting out cabbage, celery, tobacco, tomato, onions and similar 
plants, and for small niirsery stock, will commend itself 
to every gardener, florist, nurseryman and amateur. The 
price is low; it is made entirely of iron, but of a pecu- 
liar pattern which makes it strong and light and more 
durable than similar tools on the market. It is of con- 
venient shape, neat and attractive in appearance. Price, 
40c. each; it ordered bj' mail, 20c. must be added for 
postage. 

THE COMBINATION WEEDER. 




The Latest! TJie Simplest ! 

Eqiialed by J\oi8e I 

Combining as it does, both the rake and hoe, it 
is the most serviceable, durable and the most per- 
fect Weeder on the market. 

It is especially adapted to cutting Weeds and 
Grass, shallow cultivation and stirring of the soil 
of all Garden Crops, Flower Beds and Nursery 
stock, that require hand cultivation in the earlj' 
stages of growth. It is neatly and strongly made 
of malleable iron (tinned) and the blade of the best 
spring steel sharpened on both edges, which allows 
weeding close to the plants. The manufacturers 
guarantee every Weeder to give satisfaction to the 
purchaser or refund the price paid, 30c. 



The Best Weeder I 
Superior to Ail ! 




out any strain or jar av 



hat ever 
Price 



THE LEVIN PRUNER. ^, . ^ ^^ ^ 

This IS one of the strong- 
est and best cutting pruners 
for its size. The cut is very 
smooth, very much more 
so compared to other prun- 
ers, and is faster than a 
knife. It is a splendid and 
cheap instrument for trim- 
ming young trees, rose- 
bushes, vines, etc. Any lady 
or child can use it and make 
a half or three-quarter inch 
cut according to size, with- 

Give it a trial and be convinced of its good qualities. 
— No. 1, 7 inches long, -J inch cut. Si. 00. 

No. 2, 7 " "I " " 1.25. 
By mail, jDOst paid. 




118 



EICHARD FEOTSCHEE'S ALMANAC AXD GAEDEN MANUAL 



GARDEN IMPLEMENTS. 




Loop Fastener, swing socket Scythe Snath. 




Ladies' Set, Floral Tools. No. 5. 




Weeding Hoe and Rake Combined. 




0. G. Hand Pruning Shear. 




Lang's Weeder. 




Diuch. or Scuffle Hoe. 




French Perfection Shear. 





5a\ 



rnor's Pruning Knife. No. Iy2, 



Savuor's Pruning Knife, No. 194. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



119 




Hedge Shear. 




Slide Pruning Shear. 



"*. 




Spading Fork, D Handle. 




Excelsior Weeding Hook. 



Cast Steel Garden Trowel. 






Wot )da son's Hellow 




Strawberry or Transplanting Fork. 



Weiss' Hand Pruning Shear 



120 



RICHARD FROTSCHER's ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



DEAKIN'S IMPROVED BRASS GARDEN SYRINGES. 



AMEEICAN. 
liength of Barr&l, 12 in. ; diam., 1. 




No. A. — Length of barrel, 12 inches; diameter, 1 inch, with one stream and spray rose. 

Price, $2.25. 




No. 2. — Ladies' Syringe; Length of barrel, 14 1 inches, diameter 1 f^^ inches; with one stream 
and two spraj^ roses. The two roses, when not in use, are screwed on the sides of 
the barrel, as shown in cut. Price, $4.25. 




No. 3. — Length of barrel, 18 inches; diameter, 1| inches. Best Plate Valve Sj^ringe, large size, 
with one stream, two spray roses and side pieces on barrel. Price, $6.50. 




No. 8. — Length of barrel, 18 inches; diameter, 1| inches. Best Conical Valve Syringe, extra 
large diameter and length of barrel, with cross handle and one spraj' rose. Price, $8.00. 




No. 11. — (Second Quality.) Length of barrel, 18 inches; diameter, Ih inches. Open Eose 
Syringe, full size. Two spray roses and one stream. Side attachments. Price, $4.25. 

DEAKIN'S NEW SYRINGE. 

The cheapest all brass syringe made; full length of barrel, eighteen inches; H inches 
diameter. The following is what the manufacturers snj about it : "In response to the oft ex- 
pressed desire of our customers for a very cheap brass syringe of large capacity of barrel, we 
have decided to place upon the market a syringe which we feel confident will give satisfaction. 
An all brass, fuU length valve syringe; fills quickly and discharges perfectly. Price, $2.25. 

The Deakin's Syringes are known to be the best manufactured in America, and are far 
superior to the imported. 

LEWIS' COSVIBINATION FORCE PUMP. 

This Pump is made of heavy mandrel-drawn 
brass tubing, is 32 inches long, and about ly 
inches in diameter, weighing about 4^ lbs. 
It is a combination of three very useful in- 
struments or machines : a Force Pump, an 
i\.gricultural Syringe and a Veterinary Syringe 



or a nozzle for a round and solid stream. 

As a Force Pump, with its three feet of hose attached, it will throw a good sized stream of 
water from fifty to sixty feet. It is very useful for throwing liquids on fruit trees and for 
sprinkling lawns. It has a spray attachment, which being attached to the nozzle will produce 
a spray or solid stream instantly, merely by a single movement of the thumb. The attach- 
ment is simple in construction, made of brass and cannot get out of order very easily. 




FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



121 



The pump part unscrews near the base, opposite where the hose is attaeheil and the per- 
forated or syringe nozzle is screwed on in its place. This can be used for syringing small plants. 
Price, $5.50 net. 

LEWIS' AGRICULTURAL SYRINGE. 

This exterminator is 20 inches long by Ij] inches in dianietcr. It is made of Zinc tubing 
which does not rust by using strong chemicals. The piston is tittcd with Lewis' Patent Ex- 
pansion Valve, which holds the liquid at any point in the tube, except on pressure of the 
handle, when it discharges the liquid on each hill. It is very simple and durable, also the 
cheapest syringe on the marlcet. Price, $1.25 net. 

CHAMPION FORCE PUMP. 

This cut illustrates a Portable Force Pump, \\hich, 
combining as it does, the efficiency and durability of 
the higher priced Pumps on the market, is offered at a 
price which places it within the reach of all. 

Being made of brass, with white metal top and l)ase, 
it will not rust or corrode. It is capable of throwing 
from 8 to 10 gallons per minute to a distance of 50 feet. 
For washing windows, carriages, verandas, etc., it has 
no equal. 

By simply adjusting the Sprinkler which goes with 
each pump, it is adapted for spraying gardens, lawns, 
etc. ; also for throwing liquid solutions of all kinds to 
destroy noxious insects on plants, vines and small 
trees. 

This Pump is furnished with two feet of 5 inch dis- 
charge hose, and a tin nozzle and sprayer. It has no 
suction hose, as the Pump sets in the water, thus 
securing perfect suction. 

The weight, when boxed for shipment, is about S 
pounds. Price, $4.00. 

THE ''LITTLE GEM" SPRAYING PUMP. 

This Pump is made entirely of brass. The working parts, discharge and connecting tul)es, 
plunger, rod and air-chamber, so that all parts (except the rubber hose and valve packing) that 
come in contact with the liquid are of brass, making it practical for using any of the insecti- 
cides, emulsions, arsenites, fungicides or ammoniacal 
mixtures now in common use for saving fruit, foliage 
and flowers from destruction by insects and fungiis. 
It is supplied with two brass nozzles, one for a round 
or solid stream; the other, our "Combination Ver- 
morel," which throws a tine misty spray, using only 
a small amount of liquid to cover a large space; and, 
by a brass needle point operated by a spring, may be 
condensed to spray a single plant without spraying the 
ground between the plants, and also serves to clear 
the nozzle of any obstruction that might lodge in the 
aperture. It has two feet of vulcanized rubber hose, 
to which is attached a brass hand-tiibe, with the solid- 
stream nozzle tirmly fastened, to which the Yermorel 
is attached or detached by a screw connection, at the 
pleasure of the operator. 

The large capacity of the air-chamber and length of 
cylinder, together with the power of the inflating valve, 
enables it to throw a continuous steady stream tifty 
feet, or a steady spray for thirty seconds or more after 
the operator stops pumping. The i:»ump is neat in de- 
sign, very compact, strong and durable, nothing liable 
to get out of rejDair or wear out that could not be re- 
placed at a cost of a few cents. The entire weight of 
the Pump complete is 4 lbs. When boxed ready for 
shipment, 7 lbs. The price, with both nozzles, includ- 
ing an iron stirrup for holding it tirmly in the pail 
with the foot, is $4.50. 





122 EICHAKD FKOTSCHER's ALMANAC A^[D GARDEN MANUAL 

TOBACCO DUST. 

I have a supply of this well-known insecticide, which is one of the best and cheapest insect 
destroyers known. It is one of the most effective agents against the cabbage-fly and worms, 
which are so injurious and destructive to Cabbage and Cauliflower plants; also for Cucumbers 
and Melons. 

It is used very extensively by the largest Cucumber growers in this vicinity with satisfactory 
results. It is generally put on the plants in the morning when the dew is on them or just after 
a ram. After a few applications it has been found to be verv efliective. 

Price, 10 1b. packages, 30c; 100 lbs., S2.00. 

HAMMOND'S SLUG SHOT. 

An excellent article for destroying cabbage ing, or when applied in the evening, plants 

fleas, green lice, turnip and beet fl}', potato should be watered over the leaves half an 

bugs, grub worms, etc. It is ready for use, hour before the Slug Shot is applied, 

and only requires to be dusted on to the plants \ 5 lb. packages, 30c. each, 

while the}' are wet with the dew in the morn- ) 

WHALE OIL SOAP. 

Very effective for washing trees and des- pot or syringe; used in this manner it. will 

troying all insects on the bark; it is also an j promptly rid cabbage or any other vegetable 

exterminator of insects and hce on plants and ' plants, also rose bushes and all sorts of fruit 

shrubbery. Mix at the rate of one pound of trees of the aphides and other insects which 

soap to two quarts of hot water, and then add so often injure them, 

five gallons of cold water, apply with watering i Price, 1 lb. boxes, 15c. 

The following 'mixture has been found to be very effective in destroying all parasites and 
insects on fruit trees. 

KEROSENE EMULSION. 

This solution is used with great success in i Oil. churn the mixture with a force pump till 

killing all sucking insects, such as scales, plant j it forms a cream which thickens upon cooling, 

lice, and above ail the destructive Icterya or I For scale insects dilute one part of the emul- 

Cottonj^ Cushion Bug on orange and other I sion with nine parts of water, and for all 

fruit trees. ; other insects one part of the emulsion with 

The following formula will be found one of i fifteen parts of water. This mixture can be 

the best : ' very easily made by any person using the 

Dissolve h lb. of Whale Oil Soap in s gallon ' above ingredients. 
of boiling water, then add 1 gallon of Kerosene i 



■ ^ ♦ 1^ 



PRICE-LIST OF GARDEN IMPLEMENTS. 



I<^lortil Tools. 

No. 8. Boys' Garden Set, 3 pieces. Hoe, Eake and Spade SI 50 

No. 80. " " 4 ^' Hoe, Eake, Spade and Fork 175 

No. 5. Ladies' Set, 4 pieces, Hoe, Eake, Spade and Fork 80 

Ladies' Extra Heavy Set, 3 pieces, Hoe, Eake and Spade 1 '25 

Foi'lis. 

Geneva Spading, Long Handled, 4 tine / 75 

" (strapped) 80 

Spading Short Handled (strapped) 7oc., 1.00 and 1 25 

Manure Geneva Long Handled, -4 tine (strapped) 70 

5 tine " 90 

6 tine " • . 1 00 

Oxford Hay Forks, 3 tine (5 foot handle) 45 

3 tine (^6 " ' 55 

4 tine (6 " ." 60 

IXoes. 

W. A. Lvndon's Louisiana, No. 00 — Field 90 

No. 0— " 100 

No. 1— " 110 

No. 2— " ... 120 

W. A. Lyndon's Louisiana, No. 1 — Tov 90 

No. 2—"" 100 

Carolina, No. 000— Field 50 

No. 00— •' 60 

No. 0— " 75 

No. 1— " 80 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



123 



HOES (Continued). 

Sandusky Tool Go's Planters' No. 2 S 

No. 6 

No. 3/0 

" " No. 4 

Two Pronged German Forged Steel 

Enterprise Socket with handle 

Two Pronged Weeding, with handle ... 

Smith's Solid Shank, No. 51, (Pointed) 

Harper's Hoe and Rake, Combined 

Dutch or Scuffle, with handle (American) 

Dutch or Scuffle, without handle (Saynor & Cook), 5 inches 50c., 7 inches 

Solid Shank Cotton, with handle, No. 00 

" Planter's " " No. 000 '. 

" " " " " No. 2 

" " " " " No 4 . . . 

Tiffin Patent Adjustable, No. 1 with handle 

" " " No. 2 " 

<< «f «' No. 4 " 

German Pattern Garden, No. 7/0 " 

No. 5/0 " 

No. 3/0 with handle 

No. 1/0 " 

No. 2 " 

No. 4 " 

Grub or Sprouting, No. 7/0 with handle 

No. 5/0 " 

Two Prong Grape with handle 

Knives. 

H. & J. W. King's Pruning from 60c. to 1 

Saynor & Cooke's " from 75c. to 1 

Saynor & Cooke's Budding $1.00 and 1 

Geo. Wostenholme's Pruning I. X. L 

Maher & Grosh's Budding, (Cocoa handle) .... 

" " " (Ebony handle) 

" " (Ivory handle) 

Potato Hooks. 

Long Handled, 4 tine, (Goose Necked) ' 

6 tine 55 and 

"4 tine (flat) 

'• " 4 tine (round) .... 

" " 4 tine, Extra Heavj^ ... 

JPniiiing: ^a-^vs. 

Diston's 12 inch No. 7 

' ' Compass 14 inch 

Crescent 12 " 

Duplex 16 " 1 

18 inch No. 7 1 

Brown's 18 inch 

Ralices. 
Geneva Tool Co's, Cast Steel, 10 teeth, (Braced) 

a a a e t 1 O " (( 

" " " "14" " 

a II (( ( ( -j e t< << 

Challenge Rakes, (Malleable Iron) 10 teeth 



Harper's Rakes, 



14 

16 
10 
12 
14 
16 



Wood Head Rakes (Wrought Iron teeth) 

English Wrought Iron Rakes without handle, 10 teeth . 

(( (( (1 a n a 12 " 



16 



Wooden Hay Rakes . 



30 
40 
25 
35 
60 
35 
50 
40 
40 
50 
60 
50 
45 
50 
55 
55 
65 
75 
35 
40 
45 
50 
55 
60 
45 
50 
75 

2.5 
50 
40 
75 
40 
60 
75 



40 
65 
45 
40 
55 

90 
50 
75 
10 
25 
75 

45 
50 
60 
70 
30 
40 
45 
50 
25 
30 
35 
40 
40 
50 
60 
80 
2a 



124 RICHARD FKOTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 

Ji^pacles. 

Ames' Long Handled (extra heavy) . . $ 1 10 

Bright... 90 

Hadmns' Long Handled 65 

Blair's Spades, Long Handled 80 

French Steel, Bright, without handles $1 00 to 1 25 

Toy for Boys or Ladies 40 

JS!»liovels. 

Ames' Bright Long Handled (round point) , 90 

Hadwin's Long Handled (round point) 65 

Had win's " " (square) 65 

Toy for Boys or Ladies 50 

Handles for French Scythe Blades (with Eing and Wedge) ... 85 

No. 1, (American) Eing and Plate Heel . . 60 

:No. 0, " " " 50 

:No. 00, Swing Socket ' 65 

INo. 2, Two Eing Bush 75 

J*iic?liles. 

English (welded), No. 2 40 

No. 3 45 

Scotch (riveted back) No. 0. 50 

No. 1 60 

English " No. 2 ...... .'. 50 

No. 3 60 

Erench Sickles, No. 1 35 

No. 2 40 

smiears. 

Hedge Shears, 8 inches 2 00 

" 10 " 1 75 and 2 25 

" 12 " .. .. 2 50 

Pruning Shears, No. 1, "SViss. A 1 75 

No. 2, " 165 

No. 3, " 150 

" - No. 4, " 140 

Pruning Shears, No. 2, Wiss. B 1 65 

No. 3, " 150 

No. 109, " Steel Springs, 9 in. 2 00 

No. 110, " " " 10" 2 25 

No. lU, " " " 11" 2 50 

"Wiss Practical Orange Clipijers 1 00 

" Orange Shears 90 

Pruning Shears, Hessenbruch (German) No. 565 — 23c/m 1 00 

" " " " Ladies Favorite for Eoses, No. 37— 14 c/m 100 

No. 8— 20^ c/m 75 

No. 8—23 i c/m 100 

No. 1—22 c/m 75 

No. 1—24 c/m 100 

" O. G. No, 2, Saynor, Cooke & Eidal 150 

No. 655, " " " 7 in 165 

No. 655, " " " 8" 180 

French Perfection, No. 1 2 75 

" " " " No. 2 2 50 

Extra Heavy French, (Pat. i3rass Spring) No. 1 and No. 2 . ... 3 00 

Heavy French, (Faber) No. 2 2 75 

Slide Pruning Shear, No. 1, Saynor & Cooke 2 50 

No. 2, " " 3 00 

" No. 3, " " 3 50 

No. 4, " " 4 00 

Lopping Shears, (Eagle Claw) English, No. 1 2 75 

No. 2 3 00 

Eagle Pruning Shears, (American) • • • • 2 50 

Water's Improved Tree Pruners 10 feet 2 25 

12 feet 2 50 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 125 



JScy tlies. 

Frencli, First Quality (polislied) 18 inches , >> 75 

20 " .'.''. ''.'.'..' 80 

22 " H5 

" " " 2-1 " . . . . ' 90 

26 " '. 1 00 

28 " 1 10 

Second Quality (blue) 22 " 75 

24 " SO 

26 " 90 

28 " 1 00 

French (Croix brand) 22 inches . 70 

24 " ..." 75 



6 


(< i 


8 


a i 


10 


a ( 


12 


<( (( 


16 


1 c n 



26 " 80 

28 " 90 

Have also the above blades bridled @ 40c. extra. 

American Grass, 26 to 28 inches . . 75 

Blood's Champion Bramble, 26 to 30 inches 75 

New Orleans Bramble, 20 to 24 inches . G5 

The French Scythe Blades are imported by me, and are of best qnality; none better 
can be had. 

Woodason's Kello-ws. 

Double Cone (for insect powder) 3 00 

Single " " " 100 

Atomizer (for liquid and powder) 2 GO 

Pure Pyrethrum Powder for above bellows X^^- ^o^ l^*^- 5 /^Ib. 25c. ; 1 lb. boxes 50 

Waterinja: I'ots. 

4 Quarts, Japanned, Screw Tops 35 

• 40 

50 

: 65 

75 

90 

Extra Heavy (hand made) No. 1, 20 Quarts , 2 00 

No. 2, 16 " 175 

No. 3, 14 " 150 

No. 4, 10 " 125 

No. 5, 8 " 100 

The latter are made of the best material, and have very line rose heads; they are made by 
a mechanic who has been furnishing the vegetable gardeners for years with these pots, and has 
improved upon them until they are perfect for the purpose. 

jMiscellaneou-S. 

The Granger Broadcast Hand Seed Sower S4 50 

Excelsior Weeding Hooks 20 

American Transplanting Trowels 10c. to 20 

English " " 5 inch 35 

" " 7 " 50 

Diston's Transplanting Trowels, (solid shank) 6 inch 45 

Enterprise " " " 7 " 15 

Transplanting Forks, (Steel) 35 

(Malleable Iron) 20c. and 25 

American Briar Hooks 1 10 

Lang's Hand Weeder . . 25 

Fork Handles 15 

Hoe Handles 10c. and 20 

Rake Handles .... 15 

Spade' and Shovel Handles 20 

Edging Knives for trimming Grass borders 35c. to 50 

Diston's 10 inch Flat Files 25 

' < 12 " " 35 

Trowbridge's Grafting Wax per lb. 40c. ; per }{\h. 15 

Scotch AVhetstones 20 

American Indian Pond Whetstones 10 

American Berea "^Mietstones 10 

French Whetstones 15 

Hammer and Anvil for beating French Scythes 1 5n 

Eaflaa, (for tying) per X^^- l^c. ; per lb. 3< > 



126 



EICHAED FEOTSCHEE's ALMANAC AND OARDEN MANUAL 



LIST OF A FEW VARIETIES OF ACCLIMATED FRUIT TREES, 

SUITABLE FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



HOTV TO PLANT TEEES. 



Altlioiigli there are niimerons books and 
jDapers published on arboriculture, giTing ne- 
cessary informations ho^ to plant trees, I am 
often asked bv some of my customers how 
to plant and prepare th6 soil for fruit trees. I 
therefore cleem it necessary to give here some 
short instructions. 

Make the ground thoroughly mellow at 
least 15 inches deep and 3 or 1 feet wide each 
way, if holes are to be dug; thorough plowing 
of entn-e plat is preferable if it can be done. 
Prune the tree close; straighten out roots 
■evenlv. having the tree standing the same 



depth it was in nursery; work fine, mellow 
soil (Tsut no manurei among the roots, and 
when they are all covered an inch or two, 
press the soil firmly down with the foot of a 
broad-ended maul, after which fill up evenly 
with loose soil, over which place a mulch of 
rotten straw, or manure, 3 or -i inches deep, 
extending three feet every way from the tree. 
^Tiether the mulch is j)ut on or not, keep the 
soil well cultivated about the tree. In this 
climate all trees should be headed low and 
leaned a little to the northwest when planted. 



DISTANCES APAET TO PLAXT TEEES, YIXES, Etc. 



Peaches, Plums, Standard Pears, Apricots, 

in light soil, 16 to 18 feet; in strong soil, 18 
to 20 feet each way. 

Figs should be planted 20 to 24 feet apart. 

Dwarf Pears, Quinces, etc., 10 to 15 feet 
apart. 

•Japanese Persimmons, 10 to 12 feet. 

Graj)es, such as Delaware, Ives Seedling, 



which are of slow growth, 6 to 8 feet apart 
each way. 

Thrifty gi'owers, like Concord, Triumph, 
Goethe, etc., 8 to 10 feet apart. 

Herbemont, Cynthiana, etc., which are the 
most rapid growers, 12 feet apart, in rows 3 
feet wide. 



DIEECTIOXS FOE PLAXTING LE COXTE PEAE TEEES. 



Plant the tree up to the collar in a large 
liole, filling it with a rich loam in which some 
fertilizer has been mixed; press the earth in 
firmly around the roots, using water in dry 
weather; trim back one-half of each year's 
growth till the fourth vear, then trim only in- 



growing and chafing limbs with a view to 
spreading the head. Plant thirty feet each 
way. Clean culture and broad-cast manuiing 
are best. For best results plant large one year 
trees, and only those grown from cuttings. 



LE CONTE PEAR. 



This new Southern pear is as vigorous in 
growth as the China Sand, and is an enormous 
bearer. The fi'uit is large, j)ale yellow, juicy 
melting and of good quality, doing better in 
the South than elsewhere. It bears transporta- 
tion well. Time of ripening begins about the 



It promises to be the pear 



middle of July, 
for the South. 

Eooted one year old trees, -l to 6 feet, 20c. 
each; S15.00 per 100; $2.00 per dozen; 2 year 
old trees, 6 to 8 feet, 25c. each; $2.50 per 
dozen, $18.00 per 100. 



KIEFFER'S HYBRID PEAR. 



A variety fi-om Philadelphia ; a hybrid be- 
tween the'China Sand and Bai-tlett, both of 
which resemble it in wood and foliage. It has 
the vigor and productiveness of its Chinese 
parents. Fruit large and handsome; bright 
vellow and red cheek; flesh tender, juicy and 



well flavored. 



It comes into bearing at an 



early age. Eij)ens end of September, or be 
ginning of October. It is an excellent sort 
for preserving. 

One year old trees, branched, and fine, 20c. 
each; $2.00 per doz. 



BARTLETT PEAR. 



This well-known variety, one of the finest 
pears in cultivation, has been successfully cul- 
tivated here; but occasionally it has bhghted. 
Since the introduction of the Le Conte, trials 
have been made with success, that is by 
grafting this, and other fine varieties, upon 
the Le Conte; — by so doing, the trees are im- 



parted with the vigor of the latter, growing 
stronger, and making finer and healthier trees. 
I offer trees grafted on the Le Conte stock, 
for sale. 

One year old trees, 3 — 4 feet, 2oc. each; 
$2.50 per dozen. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



127 



DUCHESS D'ANCOULEME PEAR. 

Anotlier popular variety which does well in this section. — On Le Conte stock. One year 
old, 25c. each; $2.00 per dozen. 

HOWELL PEAR. 

One of the best for here. Tree is au upright free grower; is an early and profuse bearer. 
One year old, 25c. each; $2.50 x^er dozen. 

CLAPP'S FAVORITE PEAR. 

A large new pear, resembling the Bartlett; but does not possess its musky flavor. Fine 
texture; juicy, with a' rich, delicate vinous flavor. It is very productive. On Le Conte Stock. 
One year old, 25c. each; $2.50 per dozen. 











Le Coute Pear. 



128 



KICHAKD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



JEFFERSON PEAR. 



Anotlier blight proof pear, Yery distinct in 
habit and growth from other yarieties under 
cnltivation. Cannot be stated yet under what 
particular type or species it should be classed. 

It ripens in Central Mississippi from the 
1st — 10th of June, is in the market with the 



earliest peaches, and brings the highest prices. 
It is above medinm size, color bright 3'ellow, 
with a bright deep crimson cheek. It is ripe 
and marketed before Le Conte is ready to 
ship. It is jDOor in flavor. 

One year old, 2oc. each; S2.o0 per dozen. 



CARBER'S HYBRID PEAR. 

A cross between the China Sand and Louise Bonne the Jersey; grows vigorous and jiro- 
ductive. Shape roundish, large red cheek. It is juicy, good flavor with slightly acid. Price, 
25c. each; S2.50 per dozen. 




Kieffer Pear. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



129 



IDAHO PEAR. 



This new pear has been so well described 
and praised up by Testimonials from the most 
prominent Pomologists and Fruit Growers 
in my former Garden Manual that it requires 
no further description here. It is certainly 
one of the most noteworthy of all new varie- 
ties which have lately been introduced. 
Although it originated near Lewiston, Idaho, 
it is like the well-known Le Conte, quite hardj'^ 
in our Southern climate, a vigorous grower, 
and said to be entirely blight proof. 

The fruit is very large and handsome, irregu- 
lar globular, somewhat depressed. The cavity 
of the fruit is very irregular, basin shallow 



and pointed; calyx very small and closed; 
core very small; skin golden yellow with 
many russety spots; flesh melting, juicy, with 
a sprightly, vinous, delicious flavor. It 
ripens in September and October. 

Wherever the tree has fruited it proved an 
abundant bearer. In this section it has how- 
ever not fruited yet. This pear is certainly 
worthy of a trial by every person interested 
in raising fine fruit. 

One year old trees, 30c. each, $2.50 per 
dozen; two year old trees, 40c. each, $4.00 
per dozen. 

All on Le Conte stock. 




Bartlett Pear. 



9 



'-viWWi5Vv«R^ ■ 



130 



RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




FOE, THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



131 



SATSUMA OR BLOOD PLUM. 



This Plum is from Japan; it has been 
fruited in California a few years ago. The 
following is the description given by theintro- 
dnceij Mr. Luther Burbank: "It is nearly 
six Aveeks earlier than the Kelsey, firm flesh ; 
much larger, of liner quality, color and form. 
It is an early and enormous bearer, and the 



trees grow with more vigor than any of the 
other varieties of Japan Plums I have fruited 
here. The seed is also the smallest yet seen. " 

The flesh is dark red, solid color from skin 
to pit, Arm, rather juicy, and of good flavor. 

Price, 30c. each; ^3.00 per dozen. 



OCAN AND BOTAN PLUMS. 



Two other Japan varieties. They are vigor- 
ous, handsome growers; branches smooth 
with rich light green foliage. 



The Oi 



is a large yellow variety. 



ripens early, and is very sweet. The ISotsin 



is very large, reddish blue; a good keeping 
and ship2)ing fruit. Japan fruit does well 
here generally; everybody should try a few of 
these plums. 

Price, 25c. each; 2.50 per dozen. 



APRICOT PLUM. 

(PKUNUS SIMONI.) 



This plum comes from North China. It was 
fruited for the first time in 1885, by a well- 
known nurseryman in Texas. The fruits, 
when ripening, shine like apples of gold, and 
become of a rich A'ermillion when ripe. It is 
very firm and mealy, and equal to any plum; 



has never been attacked hj the Curculio. It 
will carry any desired distance. 

Tree verj^ thrifty, upright; earlj" and abund- 
ant bearer.- 

Price, one year old trees, 25c. each; $2.50 
per dozen. 



W8LD GOOSE PLUM. 

A native variety from Tennessee, where it is highly esteemed for market, 
grower; the fruit is large and of good quality. 
Price, 25c. each; s2.50 per dozen. 



It is a strong 




Wild Goose Plum. 



132 



KICHAED FEOTSCHEE S ALMAXAC AND GAEDEN MANUAL 



MARIANNA PLUM. 



This plum originated in Texas, supposed 
accidental seedling of the Wild Goose. It is a 
rapid grower. Grows from ctittings; it never 
throws up any snckers or sprouts. Fmit as 
larcre. good and handsome as the Wild Goose: 
one to two weeks earher: hangs on better; 
ships well; ripens and^colors beantifallT, if 



picked a few days previonsly. It is the best 
of the Chickasaw type. This variety and the 
Wild Goose shotdd be fertilized by the com- 
mon Chickasaw kind to hare it bear well. 

Price, 5 — 6 feet high; ■20c. each; S2.(K) per 
doz.: $15.00 per 100. 




Mariauna Plum. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN ST\TKS. 



133 




Kelfeey's Japan Plum. 



KELSEY'S JAPAN PLUM. 



The Primus Domesiica, or European varie- 
ties, have proven worthless in the South gen- 
erally. The above will take their place prom- 
ising good results, being of Asiatic origin. 
The Kelsey Plum is from two to two and a 
half inches in diameter, heart-shaped, rich 
yellow, with purple cheek. Parties who have 
been fruiting it here in the South pronounce 
it the most magniticent plum thej^ have seen; 



it weighs from 4 to 6 ounces. It excels all 
other plums for canning and drying, and will 
carry for a long distance better than any other 
kind. Matures middle of August to September. 
It has fruited in this neighborhood this past 
season; it is a most delicious fruit, and every 
one Avho plants fruit trees should not fail to 
plant some, I consider it a great acquisition. 
Price, 25c. each; $2.50 per dozen. 



PEACH TREES. 

I have a fine assortment of Southern grown Trees, selected from a very reliable Nursery, 
Thev consist of the following varieties, viz : 



TEEE STONES. 

Jessie Kerr. 

Aiiisden. 

Alexander. 

Early Louise. 

Fleitas St. John. 

Mountain Rose. 

Honey. 

Foster. 

Crawford's Early. 

Amelia. 

As they follow in the list they ripen in succession. 
Price, 25c. each; $2.50 per dozen. 



FKEE STONES 

Stunii> the World. 
Thurber. 
Old Mixon. 
Crawford's Late. 
Smock. 
Picquet's Eale. 



CLING STONES 

04Mieral Eee. 

Stonewall Jackson. 

Old Mixon. 

Eeinoii. 

Heath. 

Nix White Late. 

Stinson's October. 

Butler. 

Chinese. 



134 



RICHAED FEOTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GAEDEN MANUAL 



CRAPE VENES. 



Have some selected varieties for the table, and for making vrine. The following is a list of 



them, Tiz: 

Moore's Early. Large size and very 
early, good for table use. Price, 20c. each. 

Delaware. Well known. Eegarded as 
best American Grape; it^does well in the South, 
with good soil and high culture. Price, 2Uc. 
each; S2.00perdoz. 

Ooetiie. Light Pink; very line for table 
use. It is the best of the Eoger's hybrids. 
Price. 20c. each; $2.00 per dozen. 

Xriuitl|>ll. This is a late variety; bunches 
very large, golden when fully ripe, line as best 
foreign, and sells equally well; melting pulj^, 
small seeds, vigorous as Concord, of which it 
is a hybrid seedling. Karely it rots: stands 
pre-eminently at the head as a late table grape. 
Price, 20c. each. 

Norton's Virg-inia. An unfailing, 



never rotting, red wine grape of line quality. 
Price, 20c. each; S2.00 per dozen. 

CyiBtliEaaia. Very much like the latter; 
same price. 

Concord. Early; very popular; good for 
market. Some years it rots. 10c. each; si. 00 
per dozen. 

Ives. Eix)ens with the Concord. Good 
for wine; vigorous and productive. 10c. each; 
t^l.OO per dozen. 

Herbeiiiont iMcKee.i A most pop- 
ular and successful red or purple grape in the 
South; excellent for table and wine. McKeeis 
identical with it. 

Price, 20c. each; S2. 00 per dozen. 

Prices for other Xurserv Stock ^^dllbe given 
on apphcation. 




Japau Persimmon. (Hacliiya.) 



FOE THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



135 



JAPAN PERSIMIVION. 

This valuable fruit has been fruited for the last few years. Most vaiieties are of excellent 
(quality; twice and three times as large as the native kind; very attractive when the fruit is ripe. 
i had some which weighed a pound, very sweet and of a most delicious flavor. As they are of 
easy culture and do well here, it is a profitable fruit to grow. 

Assorted named varieties. Price, 30c. each; $3.00 per dozen, large size. 

CELESTE OR CELESTIAL FIC. 



I have onlj^ a limited supplj" of one year old 
trees of this variet5^ They have been raised 
from cuttings in a sandy loam ; are well rooted, 
and raised to a single stem; not in sprouts, as 
is often the case, when raised from suckers 
taken off from old trees. 

The cultivation of this fruit has rather been 
neglected, which should not be so, as the fig 
is always a sure crop, with very little attention. 



It has commenced to be an article of com- 
merce, when i)reserved; shipped from here it 
sells quite readily North, put up in that way. 
The Celeste is the best for that purpose, not 
liable to sour like the yellow skinned varieties, 
and sweeter than other dark skinned kinds. 

Price, 25c. each ; $2. 50 per doz. ; packed and 
delivered on steamboat or railroad depot. 



NEW WHITE ADRIATIC FIC. 



This valuable variety has been introduced 
into this country from South Italy, where it is 
esteemed as the finest of all Figs. The tree 
attains an enormous size and is an immense 
bearer, bearing more than any other varietj'' 
known. 

The fruit is of the finest quality; the skin 
is thin like paper, thinnest at the base, and not 
like most other fi.gs thicker at the point. The 
pulp is very sweet, with small seeds, without 
a hollow space in the center; in fact the whole 
fruit is one solid pulp. 



The size of the fruit is larger than the white 
Smyrna Fig and a great deal finer in flavor. 
It begins to ripen in July, and Figs ripen 
from that time continually until frost. The 
principal crop is in August. 

This variety is extensiveh" grown in Italy 
for drying, and the finest dried Figs of com- 
merce are obtained from it. Since our climate 
is well adapted to its culture it will in time 
prove the most valuable of all Figs. 

Stock very limited. 

Price, 40c. each; S^.CO per doz. 



NEW POMECRANATE ^'SPANISH RUBY." 



This new variety of the well-known Pome- 
granate is one of the most beautiful and finest 
of all fruits of our temperate climate. Fruit 
very large, as large as the largest apjDle; eye 
very small, skin thick and smooth, pale yellow 
with crimson cheek; meat of the most beauti- 
ful crimson color, highly aromatic and \evy 



sweet. The Spanish Ruby is a fine grower 
and good bearer, and the fruit is excellent for 
shipping, as it will keep for a long time. 

It ripens shortly before Christmas and could 
be shipped to Northern cities, where during 
the holidays it would attract great attention. — 
Price, 30c. each. 



LARCE SWEET POMEGRANATE. 

Same as above, excepting in color of seed and flavor. Price, 2oc. each; $2.50 per dozen. 



MICHEL'S EARLY STRAWBERRY. 



We have various sorts of soil in Louisiana, 
and the Strawberry suitable to and succeeding 
equally well in poor or rich land, can only be 
determined by practical experiment. 

There are but few varieties which adapt 
themselves to all soils and latitudes, h^ce 
the importance of planting those which ex- 
perienced fruit growers have tested and found 
profitable. A Strawberry having all the good 
qualities, has not, and perhaps never will be 
discovered; still in choosing, it is well to 
purchase plants having as many good points 



as possible. This I claim for the Michel's 
Early. 

It is claimed to be the earliest in cultiva- 
tion. It makes perfect flowers and fruit. 
Very prolific. Price, (iOc. per 100; S5 j^er 10()(). 

I consider this variety superior to the Sucker 
State, being earlier and more prolific. It has 
become the leading market sort, home and for 
shipping North. Have dropped the Sucker 
State from my list as the Michel's Early is 
superior and earlier. 



136 



RICHAKD FROTSCHER S ALMANIC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




Michel's Early Stra\vljerry. 

LOUSSIANA SOFT SHELL PECANS. 

This is a variety of nuts which only grow South, and is a sure crop here. Those who 
planted Orange trees twenty years ago, lost most of their labor in January 1886, when 
seven-eighths of trees were killed by the severity of the weather. If Pecan trees had been 
planted instead, they would have brought a handsome income and continued to increase 
every year in their production, furnishing a never failing crop for a whole century. 

Have no Centennial nor Frotscher's Egg-Shell pecans to offer this season; as the crop from 
these trees were totally destroyed by the late storm. The heavy wind had blown and twisted 
the nuts from the trees before they were fully matured, and therefore they are unfit for planting. 
I have a limited supply of Louisiana Soft Shell Pecans; these are of a fair size and are as large 
as any to be found this season. Can only furnish five pounds to one purchaser, • 

Price, 50c. per pound. 

The pecan crop in general has been almost a complete failure; especially the fancy 
varieties. 

The following letter on Fecan Culture is written hj ]Mr. Wm. Nelson, and may be of im- 
portance to those contemplating the raising of this fruit. 
Mr. EiCHAED Fkotschee, New Orleans. i much sjDeculation as to how profitable it may 

Dear Sir:— There being as you sav "an j Pi'ove to those engaged in it. 
evident desire among many here to learn some- i It is surprising that this matter should have 
thing more about pecan growing, with a view ! received so little attention up to this time, the 
~ - deihand for good nuts being practically un- 

limited. 



of ^planting, " I send you my views on the 
subject. While not professing to be a teacher, 
I think, if you conclude to putjlish this in your 
"Garden Manual," it may be of interest to 
some who are about starting in the business; 
being only a plain statement of facts, without 



The trees as far as my observation goes, 
are subject to no disease, and have but few 
insect pests to contend with. They will grow 
in almost any soil, on high or low land, no 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



137 



cultivation, no draining, no pruning required. 
The reverse of all this is true of the orange; 
jet, how many have spent much money in 
trj'ing to establish orange groves, and so few 
to plant pecan trees. The returns from the 
first so TTncertain, from the last absolutelj^ 
sure. An orange grove in this State may be, 
and of te^ is killed out in one night by cold, 
while a pecan grove will continue to be profit- 
able for years; for so long, in fact, that it is 
-not even remembered who planted it. 

The pecan nut tree "Carya Olivea Formis," 
grows wild in many of the Southern States, 
and is said "to be indigenous along the Mis- 
sissippi river as far North as Southern Iowa." 

The bulk of the nuts on the market are 
from wild self-sown trees. Prices vary from 
5 to oOc. per pound, showing conclusively there 
is a great difference in quality. The rich, 
sweet, oily nuts of thin shell and large size 
are the best. I have some now before me, 
some small ones. I of an inch long by § of an 
inch in diameter, and others 1^ inch diameter 
b}^ 2§ inches long. These last are of ten times 
the value of the first, because of superior 
quality, thin shell and large size. These nuts 
are all from self sown trees. The yield from 
full grown trees varies from one to seven 
barrels, weighing about one hundred pounds 
per barrel. 

In no other class of A\ild fruit or nut trees 
is there a greater chance for improvement, or 
rather so great an improvement so easily 
efi:ected. We have only to select the best sorts 
nature has provided, and bud or graft them on 
the common kinds. 

The most successful method is by "annular 
budding." It may be done any time from the 
end of May up to the first part of August, 
varying as seasons and localities differ, the 
earlier it can be done the better. 

With a sharp budding knife make two cuts 
completely around the stock, about one inch 
apart, cut only through the bark, cut from 
the top circle to the lower one a straight cut 
down, now slip oft from the stock this piece 
of bark which is to be used as a pattern, that 
is, place it around the scion (or piece of branch 
on which are the buds you wish to use), 
covering a well-developed eye; make the same 
cut as before, on the scion, throw the first 
piece of bark away, fit the last piece from the 
scion to its place on the stock, wrap firmly 
(leaving the eye uncovered) with wax cotton, 
bass, or like soft material. To have the buds 
fit well, the scion should be as large or larger 
than the stock. If the oiaeration is well done, 
the buds will start in about fifteen days. When 
the buds have taken well, take off the ties and 
cut back the stock to within six inches of the 
bud. When they have grown out a foot or 
more, cut back again to within a half inch 
of the bud. Thereafter allow nothing biTt the 
bud to grow. Pecan trees may be grafted in 
the ordinary way, but I have never succeeded 
in budding them by the common method. 

Budding or grafting will cause the trees to 
come into bearing much earlier than from 



seed, to produce more regular and more 
abundant crops, besides perpetuating the im- 
proved kinds, which is the more important, 
as they do not always come true from seed. 

Pecan seed should be transplanted soon 
after the leaves fall; it must be done before 
thoy start growing in the spring. As they grow 
to be large trees, they must be planted from 
fifty to seventy feet apart. Though on sandy 
poor land they may be planted closer. Keep 
down the Aveeds from around the young trees 
for the first year or two; afterwards they will 
take care of themselves. 

In looking over my letter in your "Garden 
Manual," it struck me that I would like to say 
a few words more to those desirous of planting 
a grove of seedlings, if you think it worth 
while to make room for it. I wish to impress 
them with the importance of planting only 
the verj' best and finest nuts obtainable. To 
bear in mind the fact that the tendency of such 
seedling is not toward an improvement on, 
but towards a kind inferior to the parent tree. 
That some only even of the best selected nuts 
reproduce their kind. (It is said about sixty 
per cent, of the seedlings from good nuts pro- 
duce good fruit.) That there is no way to 
select the best of such seedlings but by wait- 
ing until they fruit, which may be eight to 
fifteen years. 

Now, as there are man}^ advertisements of 
"Large Soft-shelled Pecans" for sale for seed, 
I would advise all buyers to be very particular 
as to the source from whence they get their 
mats for planting, otherwise they will certeinly 
be disappointed in results, and incur an irre- 
parable loss of years of time. 

The tendency of this tree to sport or produce 
varieties is amply proven by the numberless 
kinds we now have. I have never seen two 
trees in a grove produce nuts exactly alike in 
size, shape and quality. Where it is possil>le 
to get nuts from a tree growing at some dis- 
tance from others (the further the better) such 
nuts would certainly be the best to plant. The 
chances that they would reproduce this kind 
are greater, because the polen from other trees 
would not be so likely to reach it at the time 
of flowering. In this connection, and while I 
think of it, I certainly advise any one against 
bujdng seedling trees, unless from a respon- 
sible and reliable nurseryman. There are 
thousands of such trees being offered for sale, 
professedly grown from good pecans, but I 
know of barrels of almost worthless pecans 
to have been sown, ostensibl}' to make stocks 
for budding, but doubtless many thousands 
of these will be sold to supply the demand for 
cheap trees. Far better to plant a nut of good 
quality which you can see before it goes into 
the ground, and wait one year longer, than to 
plant such trees, even if they cost nothing. 

It is best to raise the trees in nursery before 
planting in orchard. Plant the nuts in rows 
three or four feet apart, drop the nuts in the 
row, sow four inches from each other, cover 
two inches deep, and keep the ground clear of 
grass and weeds. The seed may be planted 



138 



EICHAKD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



any time after the nuts ripen until growth 
starts in the spring. When two years old the 
seedlings may be easily and safely transplanted 
to the orchard. 

In mj^ opinion the transj^lanting of the trees 
while young is advantageous, inasmuch as it 
causes them to make a more spreading head, 
and to come earlier into bearing. 

In adopting for propagation the three kinds 
which, on our joint investigation, we con- 
cluded to be the best, I have named them the 
"Frotscher," "Kome" and "Centennial." As 
you know, they are phenomenal in size, thin 
shell, of rich, sweet qualitj- and finest flavor. ' 

That you' have made a long step toward im- 
provement by selecting only such nuts as these 
for seed, can not be disputed; but as they do 



not always come true from seed, perpetuating 
the good kinds can best be done by budding 
or grafting. This you know better than mv- 
self . 

The good interest you take in introducing 
important kinds of seeds, trees, etc., the 
trouble and expense you have been at in this 
case, searching for the very best pecans, de- 
serves a greater reward than the mere money 
profit it may bring you, and will, I know, 
easily excuse the length of this communica- 
tion. 

Yours very respectfully, 

WM. NELSON. 

Grafted trees of the above three varieties 
can be had from me at $2.00 each. No differ- 
ence in price by the quantity. 



As our Orange trees in Louisiana, when 
either on their own roots or grafted upon the 
sour stock, frequently during cold winters 
get killed down or suffer to such an extent 
that it takes several years for them to recover 
from the effects, it is essential for us to use 
for grafting or budding upon a stock which is 
sufficiently hardy enough to stand our most 
severe winters. Such a stock we find in the 
wild native Orange of Japan, the Citrus trif o- 
liata. 

With kind permission of Dr. Gr. Devron, of 
this city, 1 copy the following article published 
hj him m the Southern Horticuliural Journal: 
CITEUS TEIFOLIATA. 

The "Citrus trifoliata" first described by 
Dr. E. Koempfer, in 1712, is the wild native 
Orange of ^ Japan, and is the hardiest of the 
citrus familj^; it has stood the winters for 
several years, uninjured, of Washington City, 
D. C, without any protection, and also those 
of New York City, by being merely sheltered 
from the north wind. 

This pretty little tree has long been used in 
Japan as a stock to bud or graft upon other 
and more tender varieties of the orange family; 
it is also used there extensively to construct 
impenetrable hedges. 

About the year 1831, Desfontaines, a French 
botanist, introduced that citrus, which he 
named ' 'Citrus triptera, " in France, and having 
found it perfectly hardy anywhere south of 
the city of Paris, he advised its propagation 
and use for hedges in Southern France. For 
the last few years this new citrus has been 
found in the catalogues of our nurserymen, 
but has not been tried as much as it should 
have been The Citrus trifoliata, when better 
known and oftener used as a hardy stock for 
the more valuable and more tender varieties 
of the orange, will extend the now limited belt 
of successful and profitable orange culture. 

Having been one of the first to cultivate the 
Citrus trifoliata in the open ground in the 
United States, and perhaps the first to see it 
bloom and produce fruit in this country, I 
must say that I know of no varietj^ of the 
citrus family that can be more neglected, more 



exposed to extremes of temperature, or to ex- 
cesses of moisture and dryness, with so much 
impunity. In seventeen years that I have had 
that citrus under observation, I never found 
an injurious insect on the tree, or its leaves, 
floM^ers or fruit. 

The Citrus trifoliata used as a stock offers 
another advantage; the j^ortions above the bud 
when removed are not lost; when treated as 
cuttings they readilj' strike roots and furnish 
new stock for the following year. 

The Citrus trifoliata, "Karataz-Banna,'" or 
"Gees," its Japanese name, was called bj^ 
Kcemj^fer, when he first saw it, in 1698, 
"Aurantia trifolia sylvestris, fruetu tetrico;" 
the fruit has an unpalatable pulj), but the 
rind or skin of the same is used as a component 
of a celebrated and popular remedy known in 
Japan as the Kikoku. The tree in Louisiana 
grows to the height of 10 to 12 feet, with 
numerous straight stout and very sharp 
thorns (a good substitute for our barbed 
wire), the leaves are trifoliate, the flowers are 
very large and have no odor, or if any, a very 
faint one, and its flowers appear a week or 
two before the new leaves, about the 17th to 
the 19th of March, say on St. Patrick's day. 
This peculiar date and the trifoliate form of 
its leaves entitles that tree to the popiilar 
name of the "Shamrock Orange" which I 
have given it. 

I have been told that this tree is an ever- 
green in Japan, but in my garden in this city 
it is always a deciduous tree, except seedlings 
of less than two years, which retain their 
leaves the first winter. The impalatable but 
very pretty fruit is of the size of a mandarin 
orange, and contains some thirty seeds, which, 
on being immediatelj^ planted, reproduce the 
original plant, thus proving this tree to be a 
wild plant and neither a hybrid nor a sport 
from some other citrus. When the first 
blossoms of March do not produce much fruit, 
a second and third bloom occur in May or 
June, and j^et all the fruits mature at the end 
of October. In November the leaves turn 
yellow and drop gradually, so that at the end 
of December none remain. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES 



139 



The deciduousness of the citrus increases 
its hardness; being dormant in winter and 
the circulation of sap very limited, riipture of 
the cells and death to the plant by a freezing- 
temperature is nearly impossible in any of our 
Southern States. 

While any variety of the orange family will 
grow well on the Citrus trifoliata, I would 
advise the use of the Satsuma and other hardy 
varieties lately introduced from Japan for the 
colder portion of this new untried orange belt. 

The onlj" objection that can be raised to the 
use of the Citrus trifoliata stock is, that it will 



produce smaller or dwarf trees. I do not con- 
sider this an objection but a (piality; more 
trees can be planted in the same space, the 
fruit easier gathered, while the trees can be 
better managed and will be less exposed to 
damage from storms, high winds or tornadoes. 

G. DEVRON, M. D. 

I have but a limited supply of the above 
seed which I am olfering at S2.0U per lb. ; Goo. 
per 4 lb. Have also a limited stock of two- 
year old trees. Price, $4.00 per 100; S30.00 
per 1000. 




Citrus Trifoliata. 



140 



EICHAED FEOTSCHER's ALMANAC AND GAEDEN MANUAL 



SPECIALTIES and NOVELTIES for 1894. 




Thorburn's Extra Early Market Bean. 



Tliorburii's Extra Early Market 
Sean. This Bean was introduced here from 
Germany two years ago. The introducer claims 
for it to be an exceedingly vigorous and 
healthy grower and enormously productive ; the 
pods being borne in clusters and as many as 
35 or 40 beans on each plant. In earliness of 
ripening it is a few days ahead of the Mohawk 
and fully a week earlier than "Best of Ax,l". 
It is rust-proof, the seecls are black, the pods 
are of a light green color, long and perfectly 
round, solid-fleshed and of very soft marrow. 

For EAELrXESS, PEODUCTn-EXESS, SOLIDITY OF 

FLESH AND KOL'NDNESS OF POD, it excels any 
bean now in cultivation. 

I think this variety will become the leading 
bush bean for the New Orleans Market gard- 
eners for shipping as well as for family use. 
Give it a trial. Have only a limited supply, 
only in packages of lOe. each. 

Tliorbiirn's Dwurf Eiiiia Beatis. 

The originators claim this bean to be a dwarf 
form of the Challenger Lima Pole Beans. It 
is a veritable dicarf Lima, grossing only from 
12 to 18 inches high, perfectly fixed in habit 
and with hardly any inclination to rtin to 
vine. It is more easily cultivated and takes 
lip less room than the rimning sort. It is also 
•earlier in bearing than the pole varieties. It 



possesses in full the delicious flavor character- 
istic of the Challenger Lima; a merit which in 
a Dwarf Lima is exclusively its own. In this 
respect it differs from all other Bush Limas. 

It is exceedingly productive; the pods are 
short and unusually thick and display the 
seeds inside by prominent knobs. They con- 
tain from two to four beans. One plant is 
sufficient in a hill. 

Price per packet, 10c. ; per jDint, oOc. ; per 
quart, SI. 00. Postage extra, 15c. per quart. 

White Rockdale Corn. fXeic.j 
This new Southern variety of field corn origi- 
nated in Georgia, and was first brought out 
here by me last year. 1 only had a limited 
quantity which I distributed among several of 
my customers for trial. It has turned out to 
be all what is claimed for it by the originator. 
It is medium early, produces large, heavy and 
well filled ears ; which are well covered by the 
shuck, thus protecting the grain from birds 
and the weather. Small cob, deeply dented 
grains; it is flintier than the Jloshy's prolific, 
of a pure white color and makes excellent 
meal. Has given general satisfaction ^^herever 
tried; even in jDoor piney-wood land. It has 
given the best yield and results at the Louis- 
iana Experiment Station, where it was tried 
alongside of other kinds, under the name of 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



141 



Snowjlake, which the origiuator 
first adopted, but finding another 
variety of corn called the same 
and to avoid confusion, he sur- 
named it after his farm ''Rock- 
dale." Recommend same very 
highly. Do not fail to give it a 
trial. 

Price, 15c. per qiiart; 75c. per 
peck; $2.50 per bushel. 

The following testimonials are 
from parties who have tried the 
Rockdale Corn last season: 

Mississippi, August 30, 1893. 
Last Spring you gave me for trial 
a sample of field corn called the 
Georgia Snowflake (^i?oc/cda/ej. I 
planted it alongside of other varie- 
ties and should say that it did re- 
markably well. The ears are 
throughout well filled and heavy, 
weighing from 12 to 15 oz. each 
and measuring from 8 to 10 inches 
in length. It was grown on sandy 
piney-woods soil, fertilized with 

stable-manure. I believe it worthy 
of a trial and will continue to 
plant it hereafter. 

B. TUMA. 




Louisiana, October 29, 1893. 

The sample of Snowflake Corn (Rockdale) 
you sent me last Spring turned out splendidly. 
I found it very prolific, makes a heavy stalk, 
does not grow too tall and the ears are of good 



Thorburn's Dwarf Lima Beans. 

size, well filled and covered by the shuck, 
think it to be a fine corn for our climate. 

OSWALD SACHSE. 




Louisiana, September 12, 1893. 
During the month of May I received a small 
package of White Corn from you, which was 
called Snowflake (Rockdale). I gave it a fair 
trial alongside of other kinds and was well 
pleased with the result; it is quite early, prol- 
ific, bearing from two to three ears to a stalk, 
all large, well filled and covered tightly by 
the shuck. On rich soil it grows tall, some 
stalks measuring from 10 to 12 feet. I consider 
it the best White Corn I ever planted in this 
section. 

HENRY SCHLOESSER. 



Paraxon Pea. (Introduced by W. H. 

Grenell). This is an excellent white wrinkled 
Pea, medium early, long straight pods con- 
taining six to nine peas. Stubbed stocky vine 
with luxuriant foliage, pods light green; 
quality superb, not excelled by any other kind ' 
and the largest producer known. 

I can substantiate the above statement of 
the introducer. 1 tried this pea the past season 
and found that it stood more heat, without 
being affected by mildew than any otlier kind. 
Those who like a first class fine flavored pea 
should not fail to give it a trial. 

Price per packet, 10c. ; pint, 25c.; quart, 
40c.; peck, S2.50; per bushel, S8.00. If or- 
dered by mail, 15c. per quart postage.must be 
added. 



142 



KICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MA.NDAL 



THE ACME HAND FORCE PUMP. 

In the introduction of the new Acme Pump, the manufac- 
turers have endeavored to present a cheap, durable and 
powerful Force Pump. With the exception of the Iron Base 
and two foot rubber hose it is made entirely of Brass and is 
very substantial. 

Wherever vermin and Insect Pests can be reached with 
the various solutions, the Acme will be found invaluable as 
an exterminator. For use in the Orchard, Green-house and 
Garden, it answers all requirements. 

The Acme is useful for Washing Carriages and handy in 
case of fire. The discharge end of the nozzle is so shaped 
that it can be used for Veterinary purposes. 

Price, S4.00. 

EUREKA EXTERMINATOR OR TORCH. 

This is a very simjDle, durable, cheap and 
eiiective contrivance for destroying Caterpil- 
lars and all other insects which destroy the 
trees and other shrubs, also the foliage and the 
fruit. It is very easy to handle and should be 
used according to the following directions: 

Place the Exterminator in a receptacle 
three inches in diameter and five inches high. 
Pour in enough Kerosene Oil to cover the body 
The Acme Pump. of the Exterminator; let it soak for 10 or 20 

minutes, then take it out and ijlace it on-^a pole fi'om 10 to 20 feet long. When you have this 
done you are ready to hght it. The best time to destroy the Caterpillar is in the morning before 
the dew is off the trees and just at twilight. The best way to put out the flame is to smother. 
There is nothing about this that can melt or burn up, consequently it is almost indestructible. 
Price. oOc. each. 





^ < o» » - 



ORANGE TREES. 

1 have a limited quantity of Mandarin and Satsuma Orange Trees to offer; they are budded 
on Trifoliata stock, which makes them the hardiest Oranges that can be planted. 

2 to 2g feet high, bushy, 75c. each; 3 feet and upward, SI. 00 each (healthy, thrifty trees). 
Can also furnish Sweet Creole Brazil and Java budded on same stock, same piice. For 

North of New Orleans the "Satsuma" are the best adapted to be planted, as this variety can be 
grown one degree North above the Orange Belt. 



EXTRA CLEANED BIRD SEED. 

I make a specialtj^ to put up choice re-cleaned bird seed in cartoons holding one pound. 
■These cartoons contain a mixture of 

SICILY CANARY, HEMP, GERMAN RAPE, 

AND GERMAN MILLET, 

all re-cleaned and of best quahty. 

Have also plain Canary put up in same way, one pound cartoons; this is of the very best 
quality and also re-cleaned. Price, 10c. per cartoon; 3 cartoons, 25c. 

Have also in bulk, the above as well as Hemp, Eape and Millet. 

Cuttle Fish Bone, 5c. apiece; 50c. a pound. 
Prepared Mocking: Bird Food in small and large sized bottles, Small bottle, 20c.; 

large bottle, 35c. 
Bird Gravel. Small sized box, 5c. ; large sized box, 10c. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



143 



Vegetables of special merit generally used by the Market 
Gardeners and Truck Farmers from this vicinity. 

They must surely be the best for the Southern States as they have been 
thoroughly tried by these people. 



Best of All Beans. (Bush.) This is 
the Market Gardeners favorite Bean for ship- 
ping, and I do not exaggerate when I state that 
two-thirds of the Beans shipped from here in 
the Spring are from that variety. It is a little 
later than the Mohawk, but is round in 
shape, much ileshier and is therefore far supe- 
rior to any other Bush Bean. It is \evj 
i:)roductive and makes a good size pod. Ke- 
commend it very highh'. 

Early Moliavrlc Six ^;¥ « e k § 
Beans. This is the earliest Bush Bean 
used by the Market Gardeners for first plant- 
ing in Spring. It is the hardiest and most 
prolific variety and comes in the market before 
any other kind. The pods are flat and long. 
They generally command high prices in the 
begitining, but after the Best of All comes in 
it loses its value, as the latter variety is given 
the preference, owing to its shape and good 
keeping quality. 

War<! weirs ' was'/MiclMey^Vax 
Beasis. This is the best Bush Wax Bean 
in cultivation. It is early, the pods are longer 
but of same shape as Dwarf Golden Wax; 
very prolific and hardy. It is not so apt to 
rust as the other varieties of Wax Beans. 
Planted almost exclusively for the market by 
the New Orleans Market Gardeners. 

Sodtiieo'ii Willovv-Lcaf Sewee 
or B&itter Beans. This is the most 
i:)rolific and hardiest growing Butter Bean in 
the South; it stands our Summer heat and 
drought better than any other variety. It is 
quite a distinct kind from any other, as can 
be seen by the leaves which are trifoliate and 
shaped like the Willo\^', therefore its name. It 
is almost exclusively jDlanted here by the New 
Orleans Market Gardeners who give it the 
preference of any other Butter Bean, as it is 
the most profitable for our section. It was 
introduced by me some years ago and has 
been brought out here of late by Northern 
Seedsmen as something new. 

l(¥liite Crease Back Pole 
Beans. My own introduction. This is 
one of the best and leading Pole Beans in 
cultivation. It is the onlj- Pole variety used 
in the Spring for shipping, earlier and more 
prolific than the Southern Prolific, round 
podded with a deep crease in the back, 
hence its name. During the shipping sea- 
son they are stenciled Mobile Beans; this —_ 
name is wrongly applied. It is one of the ^p 
best shipping Beans ever introduced and fl 
carries better than any other variety for 'H 
long distances. When in season it cannot 
be surpassed. During the Summer the 



"Southern Prolific" is the best, as it stands 
the heat better. 

€rol<1en IVax Flag^eolet Pole 
Beans. Although only introduced a few 
years ago it has become one of the standard 
market varieties. It is one of the best Wax 
Pole Beans in cultivation, as far as flavor and 
size of pods are concerned. It bears abund- 
antly and entirely stringless ; hardly ever spots 
b}^ rain or any untoward weather as other 
Beans do. It is, a favorite with the New Orleans 
Market Gardeners. 

CresceBDt City L.argfe L-aSe Flat 
DiBtcSa CafoB>ta;ie. A few years ago I in- 
troduced this Cabbage here under the title of 
No. 1, distributing the Seeds in small quantities 
for trial among tiie priiacipal Cabbage Growers 
and Market Gardeners in this vicinity. It 
proved to be one of the finest and most uniform 
heading Cabbages that I ever saw grown in 
this section. Heads are sohd and large; it is 
two weeks earlier . than my Superior Large 
Late Flat Dutch Cabbage. 

Stein's Early FSat DeitcBa Cal)- 

1>ag'e. This is one of the earliest Cabbages 
for its size. Although only introduced here 
by me a few years ago it has become one 
of the leading varieties for a winter crop. It 
is used to a large extent by the Market Gard- 
eners and is considered one of the earliest and 
best heading Cabbages for this marl>et. I have 
never had a variety of Cabbage that has become 
so popular in such a short time among the 
Market Gardeners as this sort. Eecomrnend 
it very highly. 

We\% Orleans UlarketCncnniber. 

This is one of the best shipping Cucumbers 
ever introduced and cannot be surpassed by 
any other variety. It is almost the only kind 
planted here for forcing and shipping. When 
brought to the market it commands a higher 




Stein's Early Flat Dutch Cabbage, 



lU 



KICHAED FKOTSCHER'S ALMANAC A>'D GARDEN MANUAL 



price than all other kinds, owing to its fine 
shape and dark green color. Has been intro- 
duced by me. 

]%ew Orleaos Improved Passion 
L«ettlice. This is one of the hardiest varie- 
ties of Lettuce in cnltivation for winter. 
Heads firm and solid. It is planted more for 
shipj)ing than any other kind, for which pur- 
pose it cannot be excelled. 

iVew Orleans ^larket Eg§^ Plant. 

This is one of the best and finest shaped Egg 
Plants for the market. It should be jnstly 
called the Market Gardener's Favoriie, as it is 
almost the only kind planted for shipping 



purposes in this vicinity, as well as Florida, 
as it carries better in transportation than the 
other varieties, also keeps longer in bearing. 
It is oval in shape and of large size. 

Tabasco Pepper. This variety of 
PejDper is gTov\-n for the market as well as for 
making sauce. It is pungent and strong, also 
very prolific. It is easily gathered as the fruit 
does not adhere to the stem and grows almost 
erect on the branches, as may be seen in the 
cut. This varietv is used in manufacturing 
the well-known Tabasco Sauce. It is splendid 
for family use. 




Tabasco Pepper. 



SPANISH PEANUTS. 



This is an earlv kiDcl, very prolific, otows perfectly erect and does 
not s})read on the ground like other yarieties. They can be easily culti- 
yated Ayith the plow. In haryestino- they are easily o-athered, as all the 
peas hang close to the roots. They mature in about three or four months. 
The stems, when haryested, make a yery 'orood quality of hay. The fruit 
is smaller than the Virginia and other yarieties; is yery sweet and pods 
fill out well. Can be planted close in the row and drill, yields heayily 
per acre. A yery orood feed for fattening: hoo-s. 

Price, per ft), '20p ; by mail, postpaid, 30^'; per peck, 75,^'. 

Haye also the White Virginia and lied Tennessee Peanuts in stock. 
They are larger in size than the Spanish kinds. They are of a spreading 
habit, and are cultiyated in ridges like sweet potatoes. 

Price of White Virginia is 10/* per ft). 

Price of Red Tennessee is 10,^ per ft) ; if by mail, 8,^' per ft) extra 
must be, added. 



X 



FOR THE KOUTHEllN STATES. 



145 



JERUSALEM ARTICHOKE. 

This tuber is well known, and has been described by me in my former Manuals. It is 
used for the table, also for stock feed. It does better in a rich loam, should be planted and 
cultivated like potatoes. They yield very heavily. 

Price, per bushel, $2.50; per gall., 35 cents. 



■^ ♦ »- 



COTTON SEED. 



I have of the above a large assortment; of M'hich the following is a list of the leading 
varieties. 

Petit Oulf $0.75 per bushel of 30 lbs. 



Peterliiii 1.50 

Bancrofts Hcrloiig^ 1.50 

Allen, long: istaple 1.50 

Boycis' Prolific 2.00 

Peerless 2.00 

Peeler 2.00 

Sea Island 2.50 



30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
40 



^ » ^ 



ENGLISH SOFT-SHELL WALNUTS. 

J have a limited supply of the above nuts in stock; crop of "93." This fniit is quite 
different in quality from the common varieties, as the kernel can be taken out with ease, owing 
to the peculiar softness of the shell which is easily broken and allows the former to be taken 
out whole. Price, 40c. per lb. 

^ ♦ »- 

JAPANESE CHESTNUT TREES. 

Have a small lot of grafted chestnut trees of the Japanese variety, which I think will be 
suitable for our climate. Japanese fruit having always done remarkably well in the South, I 
think the above kind is worthy of a trial. Price, 50c. each. 



TESSTI]3WC03\ri.^Xj 



Alabama, February 27th, 1893. 

The Seeds which I got from you last year 
did very well. I have recommended your 
House to all my friends and neighbors. 

HENEY STOEK. 



Louisiana, March 12th, 1893. 
I iind your "Manual" very useful and in- 



structive. 



Mks. W. a. BEADLEY. 



Geokgia, September 20th, 1892. 

The fruit of the New Orleans Market Egg 
Plant is the finest I ever saw. I sent a crate 
of the fruit to some parties in Florida, it Avas 
admired very much and they said it was the 
finest Egg Plant they had ever seen in that 
State. I think the New Orleans Market the 
prettiest Egg Plant in cultivation. 

PHILIP S. JONES. 



Louisiana, March 7th, 1893. 

Your "Garden Manual" is indispensable in 
the Southern States and every farmer and 
amateur gardener should have one. 

E. L. WOODSIDE. 

Louisiana, February 22nd, 1893. 
Our'town and country stores are well sup- 
plied with Seeds from standard dealers, l>ut 



when I want Seeds that will prove first class 
and reliable I always order them fro.n you, 
they ne\er fail to give perfect satisfaction.' 

T. J. FOED 



IS 



Mississippi, May 29th, 1893. 
Your Seeds are more highly spoken of by 
my customers than any other I have ever 
handled. W. A. BEOWN. 



Louisiana, March 12th, 1893. 
I know the superiority of your Garden Seeds 
and shall do all in my power to introduce them 
extensively among our i^eoijle. 

S. S. LYNN. 



Louisiana, March 14th, 1893. 
I am much pleased with your Seeds. Al- 
though I have dealt with other Houses for the 
past thirty years I have given your Seeds the 
preference lately. 

■^Mks. M. F. EOBEETSON. 

Mississippi, May 2nd, 1893. 
Last season was veiy unfavorable for Water 
Melons in this locality, still I raised some of 
the Lone Star variety weighing from 25 to 30 
p ounds. For (piality, they surjjasscd anything 
I ever ate in the Melon line. They arc delicious. 

A. E. WALL, M. D. 



10 



146 



EICHAED FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



PLANTER'S & GARDENER'S PRICE-LIST. 



COST OF MAILING SEED. 

Orders for ounces and ten cent papers are mailed free of postage, except 
Seems, JPeas and Com See page 4 in regard to seeds by mail. On orders 
bj the pound and quart an advance of eight cents per pound and flfteetl 
cents per quart must be added to quotations for postaife, 

SPECIAL DISCOUNT. 

On all orders, amounting to $ 5.00 and over, 10% discount. 

u 2.0.00 ''' 12 

20.00 " 15 

For larger quantities, special prices will be given on application. 

The above discount is on all seeds except Potatoes, 07li07l Sets, 
Shallots f Grass and Field Seeds, Fruit Trees and Plants which are 
net cash. 



VARIETIES. 



ARTICHOKE. 

Large Green Globe (Loan^ 

ASPARAOUS. 

Conover's Colossal 



Eoots 2 years old, 



a: 



BEANS— Dwarf, Snap or Biisli. 

Extra Early Eefugee 

Pride of Newton 

Early Mohawk Six Weeks 

Early Yellow Six Weeks 

Improved Dwarf German Wax, (stringless). 

GrenelTs Improved Dwarf Golden Wax 6 

Wardwell's Dwarf Kidney Wax 

Dwarf Flageolet or Perfection Wax 

Dwarf Butter Wax. (Bismarck) a 

White Kidney 5 

Early China Red Eye "^ 

Bed Kidney "^ 

Best of All ....i 

Improved Valentine — ^ -j 

Henderson's Bush Lima ^ 

Buri'tee's Bush Lima 

BEAJVS— Pole orRiiimiiig^. ^ 

Large Lima ^ 

Carolina or Sewee 13 

Southern Willow-Leaved Sewee or Butter 1 

Dutch Case Knife ^ 

German Wax (stringless) g 

Southern Prolific >, 

Crease Back W 

Lazy -Wife's 

Golden Wax Flageolet 

Early Golden Cluster Wax 

BEANS-EiiglBsli. 

Broad Windsor 

BEET. 

Extra Early or Bassauo 

Simon's Early Red Turnip 

Early Blood Turnip 

Long Blood 

Half Long Blood 



PRICES. 



Per ounce. 
$0 50 



10 
Per 100 



$0 75 

Per quart. 
$0 25 
25 
20 
20 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
15 
20 
15 
25 
20 
50 
75 

40 
40 
50 
30 
35 
35 
40 
40 
40 
40 

20 

10 
10 
10 
10 
10 



Per 1 lb. 
$1 75 



20 
Per 1000 

$6 00 

Per peck. 
$1 75 
1 75 
1 50 
1 50 
1 75 

1 75 

2 00 
1 75 
1 75 
1 00 
1 25 
1 00 
1 75 



Per lb. 

$6 00 



50 



Per bushel 

$6 00 
6 00 



00 
00 



' 1 


50 


3 


00 


1 5 


00 


2 


50 


2 


50 


3 


00 


2 


00 


2 


25 


2 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


2 


50 


2 


50 


1 


50 




20 




20 ! 




20 ! 




15 1 




20 1 



6 50 

7 00 

8 00 
00 
00 
00 
50 
00 
00 
00 



10 00 
20 00 

9 00 

9 00 

10 00 

7 00 

8 00 
7 00 

9 00 
10 00 

9 00 
9 00 

5 00 

60 
60 
60 
50 
50 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



147 



VARIETIES. 



BEET. — Continued. 

Egyptian Keel Turnip 

Eclipse 

Lentz 

Long Red Mangel Wurzel 
White French or Sugar. . . 
Silver or Swiss Chard 



BOR£€OJLE or KALE. 

Dwarf German Greens. ... 



BROCCOLI. Purple Cape. 
BRUSSELS SPROUTS . 



CABBAGE. 

Early York 

Early Large York 

Early Large Oxheart 

Early Winningstadt 

Jersey Wakefield 

Early Flat Dutch 

Early Drumhead 

Large Flat Brunswick 

Improved Large Late Drumhead ... 
Superior Large Late Flat Dutch 
Crescent City Large Late Flat Dutch, 

Improved Early Summer 

Red Dutch (for pickling) 

Green Globe Savoy 

Early Dwarf Savoy 

Drumhead Savoy 

St. Denis or Chou Bonneuil 



Stein's Early Large Flat Dutch (very fine) 

CAULIFLOIVER. 

Extra Early Paris 

Half Early Paris 

Early Erfurt 

LeNormand Short Stemmed 

Early Italian Giant 

Late Italian Giant 

Algiers (fine) 

Early Snowball 

Early Italian .. 



CARROTS. 

Early Scarlet Horn . . 

Half Long Scarlet French 

Half Long Luc 

Improved Long Orange 
Long Red, without core . . 

St. Valerie 

Danver's Intermediate . . . 
Chantenay Half Long 



CELERY. 

Large White Solid (finest American) 
Perfection Heartwell, (very fine) . . . . 

Dwarf Large Ribbed 

Golden Self-Blanching 

Turni]vRooted 

Cutting or Soup 

CHERVIL. 

Plain leaved 



COLLARDS 



PRICES. 



Per ounce. 


Per i lb 


$(» 10 


$0 20 


10 


20 


10 


20 


10 


15 


10 


15 


10 


25 



CORIV SALAD 



15 
30 
20 

25 
25 

25 
25 
30 

25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
30 

75 
75 
75 
75 
1 00 
1 00 

1 00 

2 00 
1 00 



10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 

25 
30 
25 
30 
30 
15 

15 
15 
15 



40 
1 00 

GO 

75 
75 
75 
75 

1 00 
75 
75 

1 00 
75 
75 
75 
75 

1 00 
60 
60 
75 
75 

1 00 

50 

50 
50 
50 
00 
00 
00 



2 

2 

2 

2 

3 

3 

3 

6 00 

3 00 



35 
30 
30 
25 
30 
30 
25 
30 

75 
00 
75 
1 00 
1 00 
50 

50 
40 
40 



1 



Per lb. 

$0 60 
()() 
(50 
40 
40 



1 00 
4 00 

2 00 



50 
50 
50 



2 50 

3 00 
2 50 

2 50 

3 00 
2 
2 
2 
2 

3 00 
2 00 
2 00 

2 50 

3 00 
3 00 



50 
50 

50 
50 



10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
20 00 
12 00 



1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
80 
1 00 
1 00 
80 
00 



50 
00 
50 
00 
00 
50 



1 50 

1 00 
1 00 



148 



EICHAED mOTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GAEDEN MANUAL 



VARIETIES. 



PRICES. 



CORN. 

Extra Early Dwarf Sugar ^ 

Adam's Extra Early - . ■ . . | 

Early Sugar or Sweet. . §< 

Stoweirs Evergreen Sugar g 

Golden Beanty o. ^ 

Champion White Pearl -j, ^ 

Golden Dent Goitrd Seed t5 -I j 

Early Yellow Canada r^ g,' 

Earge White Flint ." "^ ^ 

Blunt's Prolific, Field Z'^ 

Improved Learning -5 

Mosby's Prolific H 

Hickory Xing, (White) >> 

White Rockdale (new) . . . "^ 

^. B.— Prices for larger quantities given on application. 

CRESS. 

Curled or Pepper Grass 

Broad-leaved (grev seeded) 

Water Cress (True) 

CUCIMBER. 

Improved Earl^' White Spine 

Xew Orleans Market 

Early Frame • 

Long Green Turkey . - 

Early Cluster 

Gherkin, or Burr ifor pickling) 

EGOPl>AT¥T. 

Large Purple, or New Orleans Market 

Early Dwarf Oval 

New"York Market 

E^TDIVE. 

Green Curled • ■ ■ 

Extra Fine Curled 

Broad-leaved, or Escarolle 

ROHI.RABI. 



Early White Vienna, (Finestj 



l_^ Jli ti £%.• 

Large London Flag, American grown. . . 

Large Carentan ' " " 

LETTUCE. 

Early Cabbage or White Butter 

Improved Eoyai Cabbage 

Brown Dutch 

Drumhead Cabbage 

White Paris Coss. ■ ■ 

Perpignan 

N. O. Improved Large Passion ;Truei. . . 

Trocadero " 

M[EEO]\, jTirSK or CAJ^TEEOl PE. 

Netted N utmeg — 

Netted Citron 

Pine Apple 

Early White Japan 

Persian or Cassaba 

New Orleans Market (true) 



Osage 



Earlv Hackensack 

MEEOIV, Tl ATER. 

f Ice Cream (White Seeded) 
Dark Icing 

Eattlesnake (true) 

Pride of Georgia 

Mammoth Iron-Clad 

Kolb Gem 

Florida's Favorite 

Seminole 

Lone Star 



£5 



'J. 



Per quart. 


Per peck. 


Per bnshe^ 


$0 25 


$1 25 i 


S4 00 


20 


1 00 i 


3 00 


20 


1 25 j 


4 00 


20 


1 25 1 


4 CO 


20 


75 I 


2 50 


15 


75 


2 50 


15 


75 


2 50 


15 


75 


2 50 


15 


75 


2 50 


15 


75 


2 50 


15 


75 


2 50 


15 


75 


2 50 


20 


75 


2 50 


15 


75 


2 50 


Per onnce 


Per i lb. 


Per lb. 


$0 10 


$0 35 


$1 00 


15 


60 


2 00 


50 


1 75 


6 00 


10 


25 


80 


15 


40 


1 25 


10 


25 


80 


10 


30 


1 00 


10 


25 


80 


20 


75 


2 00 


40 


1 50 


5 00 


30 


1 25 


4 00 


40 


1 50 


5 00 


20 


65 


2 00 


20 


65 


2 00 


20 


65 


2 00 


30 


1 00 


4 00 


20 


65 


2 00 


25 


75 


2 50 


20 


60 


2 00 


20 


60 


2 00 


20 


60 


2 00 


15 


50 


1 50 


20 


75 


2 50 


20 


75 


2 50 


20 


75 


2 50 


20 


1 


2 (X) 


10 


30 


1 W 


10 


30 


1 00 


10 


30 


1 00 


15 


35 


1 00 


15 


35 


1 IK* 


15 


40 


1 25 


15 


40 


1 00 


10 


30 


1 00 


10 


25 


75 


10 


25 


75 


10 


2.3 


75 


10 


25 


75 


10 


25 


75 


10 


25 


; 'o 


10 


25 


75 


10 


25 


i 75 


15 


30 


1 00 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



149 



VARIETIES. 



MUSTARD. 

Large Curled 

Chinese Large Leaved. . 
White or Yellow Seeded 

J^ASTURTIUM. 

Tail 

Dwarf 



OKRA. 

Green Tall Growing 

Extra Early Dwarf Green Prolific. 
White Velvet 



Creole 

ITALIAN OBflON. 

New Queen 

Bermuda (true) Red and White, 

OIVIOIV SETS. 

White 

Eed or Yellow 

SHAEI^OTS 



PRICES. 



PARSI^EY. 

Plain Leaved 

Double Curled 

Improved Garnishing 

PARSNIP. 

Hollow Crown, or Sugar 

PEAS. 

Ext \i Early, (First and Best) 

Alaska . 

Tom Thumb tc 

Early Washington | 

Laxton's Alpha S^ 

Bishop's Dwarf Long Pod T 

Champion of England =3 

Carter's Stratagem t, 

Carter's Telephone § 

McLean's Advancer ^ 

McLean's Little Gem S 

Laxton's Prolific Long Pod ^ 

Eugenie — ^ 

Dwarf Blue Imperial ^ 

Eoyal Dwarf Marrow ^6 

Black-Eyed Marrowfat '? 

Large White Marrowfat --r 

D warf Sugar 3 

Tall Sugar ^ 

American Wonder ^ 

Field or Cow, Peas Market Price. 

PEPPER. 

Bell or Bull Nose 

Sweet Spanish Monstrous 

Long Red Cayenne 

Red Cherry.. .. 

Golden Dawn Mango . 

Bird Eye 

Tabasco 

Chili 

Ruby King . 

Red Cluster 



Per ounce. 
$0 10 

10 

05 

20 
25 

10 
10 
10 

25 

25 
25 



Pel- 



quart. 

20 
20 



Per on nee. 

10 
10 
10 

10 

Per quart. 

$0 25 
25 
25 
20 
25 
20 
25 
40 
40 
25 
25 
25 
25 
20 
20 
15 
20 
30 
30 
30 

Per ounce. 

30 
40 
30 
40 
30 
50 
50 
50 
30 
50 



Per 4 lb. 

$0 25 
25 
15 

50 
75 

20 
20 
20 

1 00 

75 
75 

Per peck. 

Market Price. 



Per i lb. 

25 
30 
40 

25 

Per peck. 

$1 25 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
2 

Per 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



25 
25 
00 
50 
25 
25 
50 
00 
50 
75 
25 
25 
25 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 

ilb. 

00 
25 
00 
25 
00 
50 
50 
50 
00 
50 



Per lb. 

$0 75 
75 
40 

2 00 

3 00 

50 
50 
50 

Sold out. 

2 50 
2 50 

Per biisbel 



Per lb. 
75 
1 00 
1 25 

75 
Per bushel 

$5 00 



00 
00 
00 



6 00 



00 
00 



8 00 



00 
00 



6 00 

5 00 

6 00 



00 
50 
50 



3 50 
8 00 
8 00 
7 00 

Per lb. 

3 00 

4 00 

3 00 

4 00 
3 00 



3 50 



150 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



VARIETIES. 



15"" '-^ 



C 1 



■Jl 



Thej 



of 



POTATOES. 

f Burbank Seedling 

New York Peerless 

Boston Peerless ... 

Eural New Yorker No. 2 

White Ele I )liant 

Extra Early Vermont . . 

Vermont Early Eose ; 

Snowflake. ..'... .^ 

Early Sunrise 

_ Beauty of Hebron. ■ 

e are all Eastern grown, true to name, and 
the finest stocks ever offered in this market. 

Early Eose. Tennessee grown 

Early Triumph, '• " 

The Tennessee grown (second crop) Early Eose are 
considered the best seed of any. The' Triumph 
are highly recommended for' early shipping. 
(Drayage extra. ) 

POTATOES, S¥% EET. 

Spanish Yam 

Shanghai, or California Y^am 

Southern Queen . . - 

Prices vary according to market. Quotations 
given on application. 
PL]TlPMi:V. 

Kentucky Eield 

Large Cheese . . . 

Cashaw Crook-Neck (green striped) southern grown 
Golden Yellow Mammoth 

RADISH. 

Early Long Scarlet 

Early Scarlet Turnip 

Y'ellow Summer Turnip or Golden Globe 

Early Scarlet Olive-Shaped 

White Summer Turnip . . 

Scarlet Half Long French .. 

Scarlet Olive-Shaped, or French Breakfast 

Black Spanish (Winter) 

Chinese Eose (Winter) . 

Chartier 

White Strassburg 

California Mammoth 

ROQUETTE. 

SALSIFY, American 

Sandwich Lsland ^Mammoth^ 

SORREL, Broad-leaved 

SPIi\ACH. 

Extra Large-leaved Savoy 

Broad-leaved Flanders 

S<^IASH. 

Early Bush, or Patty Pan 

Long Green, or Summer Crook-Neck 

London Vegetable Marrow 

The Hubbard 

Boston Marrow ... 

TOJ^IATO. 

King of the Earlies 

Extra Early Dwarf Eed 

Trophy, (selected) 

Large Y^ellow 

Acme, (Livingston's) 

Paragon 

Livingston's Perfection 



PRICES. 



Per 
$1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 



bushel 

5&) 

50 

75 

75 

75 

75 

75 

75 

00 

75 



00 



Per barrel. 
S3 50 



75 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
50 
00 



•i 00 
4 50 



Per quart. 


Per peck. 


Per bushel 


SO 25 


SI 50 


S5 00 


Per ounce. 


Per \ lb. 


Per lb. 


$0 10 


SO 20 


SO 60 


10 


25 


75 


10 


40 


1 00 


10 


20 


60 


10 


25 


75 


10 


30 


1 00 


10 


25 


75 


10 


25 


75 


10 


25 


75 


10 


25 


75 


10 


25 


80 


15 


35 


1 00 


15 


35 


1 00 


10 


30 


1 00 


15 


35 


1 25 


20 


75 


2 00 


20 


50 


1 50 


25 


75 


2 00 


15 


50 


1 50 


10 


20 


50 


10 


20 


50 


10 


25 


75 


10 


25 


1 00 


15 


50 


1 50 


15 


50 


1 25 


15 


50 


1 50 


25 


1 00 


3 00 


25 


1 00 


3 00 


30 


1 00 


3 00 


30 


1 00 


3 00 


25 


75 


2 50 


25 


75 


2 50 


25 


75 


2 50 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



151 



VARIETIKS. 



TOITI 4TO.— Continued. 

Living'ston's Favorite 

Livingston 's Beauty 

Horsford's Prelude 

Dwarf Champion 

TrR]\ip. 

Early Red or Purple Top (strap-leaved) 

Early White Flat Dutch (strap-leaved) 

Large White Globe 

White Spring 

Yellow Aberdeen 

Golden Ball 

Amber Globe 

Improved Puri)le To|:) Rata Baga,(Loiig Island Grown) 

Munich Early Purple Top 

Purple Top Globe 

Extra Early White Egg 



S^VEET AWD MEDICINAL HERBS.. 

Anise 

Balm 

Basil 

Bene 

Borage 

Caraway 

%Dill.../ 

Fennel 

Lavender 

Marjoram .• 

Pot Marigold 

Rosemary 

Rue 

Sage 

Summer Savory 

Thyme 

Wormwood .... 

GRASS AND FIEED SEEDS. 

Red Clover (Extra Cleaned) 

White Dutch Clover 

Alsike Clover ... 

Alfalfa or French Lucerne 

Crimson, (an annual) 

Lespedeza Striata or Japan Clover 

Kentucky Blue Grass. (Extra Cleaned) 

Kentucky Blue Grass (Fancy) 

Red Top Grass (Choice) 

Red Top fFancy) No Chaff (40 lbs. to the bushel). 

English Rye Grass 

Rescue Grass 

Johnson Grass. (Extra Cleaned) 

Tall Meadow Oat Grass 

Meadow Fescue Grass 

Orchard Grass 

Timothy 

Hungarian Grass 

German Millet 

Rye, Texas 

Barley 

Texas Red Rust Proof Oats 

Sorghum 

Broom Corn — 

Dhouro or Egyptian Corn 

Buckwheat 

Russian Sunflower 

Winter Vetch, (Vicia Sativa) 

Teosinte 

Burr or California Clover (measured) per quart, 10c. ; per bushel, $2.50. 

N. B. — Prices for larger quantities given on application. 



PRICKS. 




Per ounce. 


Per i lb. 


Per lb. 


$0 25 


$ 75 


$2 


50 


25 


75 


2 


50 


30 


75 


3 


00 


30 


75 


3 00 


10 


20 




50 


10 


20 




50 


10 


20 




50 


10 


20 




50 


10 


20 




50 


10 


20 




50 


10 


20 




50 


10 


20 




50 


10 


20 




60 


10 


20 




50 


10 


20 




50 


Per pack. 








$0 10 








10 








10 








10 








10 








10 








10 








10 








10 








10 








10 








10 








10 








10 








10 








10 








10 








Per lb. 


Per A bu. 


Per bushel 


$0 15 




$7 


50 


30 




15 


00 


20 




10 


00 


20 




9 


00 


15 




8 


00 


20 


2 50 


4 


00 


15 




1 


50 


20 




1 


75 


10 




1 


00 


15 




5 


00 


10 




2 


00 


35 




4 


00 


15 




2 


50 


30 




3 


00 


25 




3 


00 


20 




2 


00 


10 


Market Price. 


2 


50 


10 




2 


50 


10 








10 




2 


00 


20 








10 


Per lb. 


5 


00 


50c. i lb. 


1 50 







152 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



Read and see what people say about Frotscher's Seeds for the South. 



I have only published a few of the many testimonials received the past year, 
owing to the limited space in my Manual. 



Mississippi, March 17th, 1893. 

The people over here are delighted with your 
Seeds. The Crescent City Flat Dutch Cabbage 
did splendidly, all making fine and large heads. 
GEO. K. VIEELING. 



Louisiana, September 12th, 1893. 

I consider it time and money lost using any 
other Seeds but Frotseher's. 

B. HUDSON. 



Mississippi, March 5th, 1893. 

Have grown Water Melons for a number of 
years from Seeds which I purchased from you 
and they have always given good results. 

EOBT. FIELD, M. D. 



LouisiAisrA, Februarj' 7th, 1893. 

Your Seeds have turned out to be the best 
we have ever handled. 

ADOLPH MEYEE. 



Mr.- 



Mississippi, January 11th, 1893. 
of Pike Co., Miss., a dealer in Gar- 



den Seeds, stated, that he sells the Commission 

Seeds of in large quantities, but when 

he wants any for his own use he gets them at 
Frotseher's. 



Louisiana, March 11th, 1893. 

Allow me to compliment you on your Cres- 
cent City Flat Dutch Cabbage, which turned 
out fine. S. M. COWEN. 



Louisiana, April 15th, 1893. 

The Seeds bought of you this Spring were 
aUgood. I. N. SATTEEFIELD. 



Mississippi, March 29th, 1893. 

Your Seeds are doing fine. The Eural New 
Yorker No. 2 Potatoes have done better than 
any other I have grown since I have been 
farming. FEANK E. DIETZEL. 



Mississippi, Apiil 7th, 1893. 

We have alwa5\s found your Seeds satisfac- 
tory and prefer dealing with you than buying 
from others. Mks. E. J. VAN COUET. 



Texas, March 10th, 1893. 

Your Seeds always give entire satisfaction. 

C. L. CEOSSMAN. 



Louisiana, July 19th, 1893. 

I have been buying my Seeds from you for 
the past 12 years and have always found them 
to be good and genuine. HENEY KOHN. 



Missouri, July 19th, 1893. 
Please send me one of your "Garden 
Manual's", which has been highly recom- 
mended to me as being very instructive on 
gardening in the South. 

WILLIAM BULTZING. 



Louisiana, June 18th, 1893. 
The Seeds I buy fi-om you always give perfect 
satisfaction in every respect. 

W. W. MATTHEWS, M. D. 



Louisiana, July 11th, 1893. 
The Egg Plants sent us are turning out 
splendidly. 

MES. M. E. FAUNTLEEOY. 



Louisiana, July 15th, 1893. 
The Melon Seeds I got from you are doing 
well. I suppose I have the finest 2 acre patch 

of Melons in the Parish. 

AEMAND WAETELLE. 

Louisiana, August 2nd,, 1893. 

The Seed I got from you in the Spring did 
finely. Mes. G. H. CAEPENTEE. 



Louisiana, August 4th, 1893. 

Last year I raised the finest Cauliflower that 
I ever saw; grown from the Italian Giant 
variety bought from you. 

M. J. EOSTEET. 



Louisiana, August 2nd, 1893. 

Your Seeds are always the best and give 
entire satisfaction. Mes. L. J. MILLEE. 



Hinds Co., Miss., January 15th, 1893. 

Y^our Seed is perfect in the way of germinat- 
ing and true to name. I never had any be- 
fore that did as well as yours. 

E. H. BECOME. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



Louisiana, April 1st, 1893. j 

Please accept thanks for the fine Peas i 
(American Wonder) you sent me, they are 

growing beautifully. " Miss L. Lotspeich. j 



Texas, September 28th, 1893. 
Your Seeds have given general satisfaction. 
The Crescent City Flat Dutch and Stein's Flat 
Dutch Cabbage germinated within 48 hours 
after planting. The Little Gem Sprinkler 
works nicely and does all that is intended for it. 

E. B. CRISP. 



Mississippi, February 7th, 1893. 

I have bought all my Seeds from you for the 
past two years and have always been much 
pleased with the results. JNO. A. DICKS. 



Texas, May 6th, 1893. 

I have been getting my Creole Onion Seeds 
from you for the past three years and they 
have always given utmost satisfaction. 

WAEREN HILL. 

Texas, February 25th, 1893. 

Herewith I send you a list of Seeds for 
Spring gardening. 1 cannot get along without 
"Frotscher's Seeds." 

Mes. B. F. CAMERON. 



Louisiana, August 10th, 1893. 

The Fruit Trees which I got from you last 
year were satisfactory. I did not loose one 
and the Grape Vines made a remarkable 
growth. The Orange Trees blossomed and set 
fruit, but they fell off, owing I suppose to their 
being transplanted. 

Mes. j. W. HILLMAN. 



Texas, August 7th, 1893. 

All the Seeds I bought of you gave better 
satisfaction than those which I had from other 
Seedsmen. The New Orleans Passion Lettuce 
all made solid heads. E. M. POENISCH. 

Tr- 'S',, November 22nd, 1893. 
Tlie Snap Beans I got h'om you made the 
largest crop I ever saw. 

JAMES PATTINSON. 



Louisiana, December 13th, 1893. 
All the Seeds which we got from you have 
proved satisfactory. 

JOHN W. SALLES. 



Mississippi, September 13th, 1893. 
I am very much pleased with your House 
and will do all I can for you in this neighboi- 
hood. MARTHA R. BLANTON. 



Texas, August 14th, 1893. 
Your Seeds are always good. A. PARR. 



Louisiana, July 30th, 1893. 
Your Carter's Telephone Pea is the best and 
most prolfic bearer I ever saw. 

R. C. GIBSON. 



Texas, August 25th, 1893. 
I have tried Seed from all parts of the United 
States and I consider yours the best; especially 
your Creole Onion Seed which is of quick 
growth and of good keeping quality. 

G. A. HUDSON. 



Louisiana, August 4th, ] 893. 

I have tried your Seeds last year and they 

have given me the greatest satisfaction. The 

New Orleans Market Melon and your Water 

Melons are the best ever seen in this locality. 

BART. FABER. 



that 



Floeida, September 3rd, 1893. 
A friend of mine praised your Seeds so highly 
I thought I would give them a trial. 

Mes. C. a. PETERSON. 



Louisiana, August 26th, 1893. 
The Garden Seeds I bought from you gave 
me the best satisfaction. M. GILMORE. 



Floeida, September 12th, 1893. 
A friend informs me that he has had excel- 
lent success in raising the Louisiana or Creole 
Onion in Florida, from Seed furnished by you. 

J. S. LITTLE. 

Floeida, November 11th, 1893. 
The Long Island Grown Ruta Baga Seed 
which I got from you made the finest Turnips 
that have ever been grown here in this section. 
Last Spring I had the finest Cabbage patch, 
grown from your Seed. 

EVERETT GREEN. 



Louisiana, March 10th, 1893. 
The Turnip Seed I got from you last Autumn 
was the best I ever used, Early Red or purple 
Top Variety. They grew very rapidly and 
weighed from 5 to 6 jjounds each. 

A. J. BUTLER. 



Texas, February 8th, 1893. 

I have heard your Seeds so highly recom- 
mended that I have concluded to give them a 
trial. FIDELIA GERNAUDT. 



Louisiana, March 6th, 1893. 

Y'^otir Seeds are the best we ever got. 

FRED MERRITT. 



11 



151 



RICHAED FEOTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



INDEX. 



PAGE. 

Aliuanfic 5 to 16 

Apricot Phim. .131 

Artichoke 21 

Asparagus . 21 

Bartlett Pear 126 

Beans, (Bush) 21 

Beans, (Pole) ." 21 

Beans, (Dwarf, Snap or Bush,). . ... 22 to 25 
Beans, (Pole or Running) ......... .26 to 28 

Beans, English 28 

Beets .28 to 30 

Bird Seed 142 

Borecole or Kale 30 

Broccoh 30 

Broom Corn 91 

Brussels Sprouts .' . 30 

Bulbous Eo)ts : . . . ... . .110 to 112 

Cabbage ' . ...;..... . 30 to 34 

Cauliflower 34 and 35 

Carrot 35 to 37 

Celerv 37 to 39 

Chervil . : 39 

Chostniit Trees, Japanese, 145 

Clapp's Favorite Pear 127 

Climbing Plants 108 to 110 

Collards^ 39 

Corn Salad 39 

Corn, Indian .......". 39 to 42 

Corn and Seed Planter 114 

Cotton Seed .145 

Cress 42 

Cucumber .-.,..... . , .42 and 43 

Dhouro, or Egyptian Corn 91 

Directions for Planting . 75 to 80 

Duchess D'Angouleme Pear. ............. 127 

Eggplarit . ; . .43 and 44 

Endive 45 

Fig, Celeste or Celestial 135 

Fig, New White Adriatic 135 

Fruit Trees, How to Plant 126 

Flower Seeds 92 to 110 

Garden Implements 118 and 122 

Garlic 45 

Garber's Hybrid Pear 128 

Grape Vines 134 

Grass and Field Seeds 80 to 8S 

Hot Bed 19 

Howell Pear. 127 

Idaho Pear .!,v..,.r.;. 129 and 130 

Japan Lilies .112 to 114 

Japan Persimmon . 135 

Jefferson Pear 128 

Jerusalem Artichoke 145 

Johnson Grass 91 and 92 

Kaffir Corn 90 and 91 

Kelsey's Japan Plum 133 

Kerosene Emulsion 122 

Kieffer's Hybrid Pear 126 

Kohlrabi 45 and 46 

Le Conte Pear 126 

Leek 46 

Letter on "Alfalfa" 88 and 89 

Letter on the Value of the Rve Crop . 89 and 90 
Letter on Citrus Trif oliata ". . . 138 and 139 



PAGE, 

Letter on Pecan Culture 136 to 138 

Lettuce 46 and 47 

Marianna Plum 132 

Matthews' Hand Cultivator 115 

Melon, Musk 47 and 48 

Melon, Water 48 to 52 

Michel's Early Strawberry 135 

Mustard 52 

Nasturtium 52 

New York Seed Drill 115 

Novelties 140 and 141 

Ogan and Botan Plums 131 

Okra 52 and 53 

Onion .53 and 54 

Orange trees ^ 142 

Parsley .... 55 

Parsnip 55 

Peach Trees. . . .- 133 

Peas . 55 to 58 

Pecans, Louisiana Soft Shell. . . 136 

Pepper ; 58 and 59 

Pomegranate, "Spanish Euby" 135 

Pomegranate, Large Sweet 135 

Potatoes ." 59 to 63 

Pruner, the Levin 117 

Pump,. 142 

Pumpkin .()3 and (>4: 

Price-List, Planters and Gardeners' . 146 to 151 
Price-Listj Garden Implements . . . 122 to 125 

Radish 64 and 65 

Remarks on Raising Vegetables for 

Shipping 17 

Roquette 65 

Salsify . . 65 and 66 

Satsuma or Blood Phim , 131 

Seeds by Mail 4 

Shallots 54 and ■ 55 

Slug Shot ..123 

Sorghum . 90 

Sorrel 66 

Sowing Seeds 18. 

Spinach . 66 

Spanish Peanuts 144 

Squash . .66 and 67 

Sweet and Medicinal Herbs 80 

Teosinte . . . . ; 91 

Testimonials. 145, 152 and 153 

Tobacco Dust 122 

Tobacco Seed 80 

Tomato . . : 67 to 71 

Trees, how to plant, etc 126 

Trowel 117 

Turnip 71 to 74 

Table showing Quantity of Seeds required 

to the x\cre 20 

Vegetable Garden 18 

Vegetables of Special Merit, 143 and 144 

Walnuts, English Soft-Shell, 145 

Weeder , 117 

Whale Oil Soap 122 

Wheel Garden Plow 116 

Wheel Hoes 116 

Wild Goose Plum 131 




A 





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